The three Creameries of Fayette village
1880-1966

Fayette County Iowa

...First Creamery 1880-1887...The Ellis Co., Crown Creamery (operated by the Ellis Co. of Boston), located at the old brewery/spring 5/8 mi NW of the Main.St bridge.
...Second Creamery 1889-1919...The Fayette Creamery Company (a co-op), was built on east Water.St, at the north end of Vine.St, overlooking the Volga River.
...Third Creamery 1919-1966...The Fayette Mutual Creamery Association, (aft.1955, Fayette Co-op Creamery Assoc.), was built at the south end of King.St, a quarter mile ExNE of the depot.

Editorial:  Fayette village had three different creameries from 1880>1965.  With the rails coming to Fayette.Co.IA in the mid-1870's http://www.iowaz.info/fayette/butmentbridge.htm came an expanded market for high quality butter in New York and other eastern centers which led to the rapid development of private enterprise and cooperative creameries in northeastern Iowa.  Fayette.Co.IA became one of 'thee' major producers of high grade butter.   Dairy farming and creameries produced stable and general prosperity in rural neighborhoods and villages.  The importance of early rail transportation coupled with high grade butter cannot be over-emphasized in the prosperity and history of Fayette.Co.IA.  The decline of the rural population and culture rapidly accelerated starting in the early/mid 1960's.
...Some will remember calling the cows in morning and night,  washing, scalding and setting up milking machines, separating cream, feeding skim milk to calves, the cream route driver, getting a cream/milk check, deep snow, 30-40below days.  A few will remember sitting on a one leg milk stool, milking by hand, separating by hand, the coming of electricity and milking machines.  Likely none will remember skimming cream of the top of milk and churning extra butter to sell to neighbors.


Drop down menu: (this is a very long page of time-line notes rather than a 'story' page)
...Some background ...whole milk to butter; creameries come to America; the 1st cabins & 1st farm dairy/creamery attempt in Fayette.Co.IA;  some early dairy operations in Fayette.Co.IA;  1875 Fayette.Co.IA overall assessment values.
...Brush Creek (Arlington) Creamery ...1877 & 1893, an example of an early creamery operation similar to what occurred in Fayette village.
...The Crown Creamery ...1880-1887, the first creamery in Fayette, at the brewery spring 5/8 mi NW of Main.St.
...The Fayette Creamery Association ...1889-1919, the second creamery on the east end of Water.St, north end of Jones.St, on the bank of the Volga River.
...The Fayette Mutual Creamery Association ...1919-1965, the third creamery at the south end of King.St, east of the Depot.
...
...Orear descendant tree...Wm. Orear & James Beatty started the first dairy operation in Fayette.Co.IA.
...Ellis descendant tree ... The family that set up the first Fayette creamery, the Crown Creamery.
...Eldon Otterstein descendant tree ... The last and longest serving master buttermaker at the Fayette Creamery, 1948>1965.

...
...

 

Contains webpage links to various Fayette Co. surnames and history projects.
Iowaz Index Page
The photo hosting site contains material regarding history, maps, genealogy of Fayette, Co, Iowa
Iowaz Photo Hosting Site

Use Google Earth/Maps for aerial views of current landscapes.

Page Chronology: 
...2019April...An old project left unfinished in 2010, was worked on again through Feb>Mar2019, trying to get the notes/thoughts uploaded for the first time.  Interest in creameries was rekindled while trying to figure out enough history of the old and only Fayette brewery to upload.  A little known and basically lost fact is that the first of three Fayette creameries took over the old brewery spring site and building.  The creamery project was shelved again when motivation was lost with the start of bicycling season.
...2020Mar...The creamery project was restarted.


Google:  There are many good resources regarding pioneer creamries, however little to nothing on the creameries of Fayette.IA village.
...From Churns to 'Butter Factories', 1989 (pdf, 15 pages, good, text only overview of Iowa's dairy/creamery development from 1860-1900).
https://ir.uiowa.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=9329&context=annals-of-iowa
...Little Dairy on the Prairie From Butter-makin’ Women to High-tech Agriculture, 2005 (30+ pages, good overview, with some pics of the early dairy/creamery industry in NE Iowa).
https://iowadot.gov/ole/documents/Dairyontheprairie.pdf
 ...Dairy Farming:  Being the Theory, Practice and Methods of Dairying, 1880 (660 pages, long read full of dairy/farming method/history, text/drawings).
https://ia800203.us.archive.org/29/items/dairyfarmingbein00shel/dairyfarmingbein00shel.pdf

Back to menu.

 


Some background information.

How does butter end up from whole milk??
...Whole milk (and cream) contains microscopic globules of 'butterfat.'
...The 'fat' globules are surrounded by membranes made up of fatty acid emulsifiers (phospholipids) and proteins.
...The membranes around the tiny fat globules prevent them from collecting together in fresh milk.
How is cream collected?
...As whole milk is allowed to set, up to 24hrs, the fat globules being lighter than the liquid (skim) milk compounds will float and collect at the top.
...Then the cream can be skimmed off the top or the skim milk drained off the  bottom.
...Before mechanical cream separators of the mid/late 1880's,  cream was collected by allowing whole milk to set for up to a day.
How is butter produced from cream?
...Butter is produced by physically agitating cream to damage the membranes around the tiny fat globules.
...The released milk fats molecules bind together with other molecules to form 'butter'; the liquid left is drained off as 'buttermilk.'
...The butter is washed, a special high percentage NaCl salt is worked into the butter for flavor and preservation.
...A high degree of attention to procedures and cleanliness was required from farm>creamery>shipping, in order to market high grade butter in New York.
...More info at Wikipedia.....
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Butter


...In general, 21+lb whole milk (abt. 2.5 gal) yields 2lb of cream, yields 1lb butter.

Back to menu.


Some historical background notes, leading up to the 1880 first creamery in Fayette.IA:

...1750-1850...Urban markets for cheese & butter started forming close to the east coastal population centers such as Philadelphia, Boston, New York.
.....Increased markets encouraged the early evolution of creameries. 
...1842...The first Fayette.Co.IA dairy operation (more info in next section):  Orear and Beatty started a farm level dairy operation at the Wilcox 'settlement' area, 2mi SxSW of what would become Fayette, & located adjacent to the south side of the Mission Trail.  Beatty left the area in 1843.
...1843-1846...Orear & his wife continued with the Orear dairy operation of up to 20-30 head of milk cows.  Milk, cheese & butter were hauled up the trail to the Mission & Ft. Atkinson.  This was the very edge of the virgin frontier prairie/non-glaciated when white settlers were not allowed into the Indian neutral ground to the north of the trail until 1850.
...1845...After about 1845, the states to the west of the Atlantic states rapidly developed functional diary districts that followed the expansion of rail transportation to the New York markets.
.....There was major prejudice before the 1870's, against the butter and cheese from the states westward of the Atlantic states.
...1847...S.R. Ellis & Sons, Wholesale Produce Commission Dealers, 50 & 51 So. Market St. and 3 Chatham St., Boston...Stearns R. Ellis, Emmons R. Ellis.
...1850's: At Grange & county agricultural meetings a few pioneer dairymen pondered the idea of a cooperative plan for handling their farm's milk and butter, without much success basically due to lack of knowledge of methods of handling bulk milk collection and machinery needed for butter manufacturing.
...1864...Dairying was becoming prominent in eastern Iowa and especially in  northeastern Iowa, where  the hilly, rolling terrain and pasture land was becoming more profitable as rail transportation became available in the 1860+/- in eastern Iowa; early/mid 1870's in Fayette.Co.
.....Butter production would be 'thee' key diary component for transport from Iowa to the New York market.
.....Butter production went through 4 stages in Iowa...from frontier subsistence to a creamery system.
........Frontier stage...part of self-sufficient, women's household/farm work.
.....The greatest early Iowa dairy production would be in Clinton, Cedar, Jackson, Clayton, Delaware, Dubuque Co's, with Manchester the major center of dairy trade. 
.......Soon other northeastern Iowa counties would join this group, to include Fayette, Buchanan, Bremer, Allamakee, Winneshiek, Howard, Chickasaw and adjacent counties.
...1864about...The Gilson's set up a farm dairy/cheese operation in/near the NE corner of Illyria.twp 
http://www.iowaz.info/surname/gilson.htm
...1867...The first Illinois creamery was opened (the first cheese factory in 1862).
...1870...Up to about 1870, westward butter was often classed as 'grease' in the New York market (the lowest of all grades of butter)
......1870...Iowa was in a second stage, the farm dairy, of butter production, basically extra produced on the farms for local sale to non-producers.  There was no large butter production in Iowa. 
...1872...The first Iowa creamery, John Stewart's Spring Branch Creamery, just east of Manchester, Delaware,Co, was opened (the first cheese factory in 1866).
.....Chicago would become a major market for dairy, livestock and agricultural produces during the 1870's as rails expanded westward.
...1875...Iowa would enter the third stage of butter production...the creamery stage.
.....Now farmers could get the whole mile  (and sometimes skimmed off cream) to a creamery and received the steady milk/cream check; farm women no longer earned/controlled money from selling butter locally.
...1876...John Stewart's Iowa butter received the highest award at the Centennial Show at the Philadelphia Exhibition, and western diary products began to command equal prices in the New York market. 
.....Iowa and other states with natural prairie grasses and wild pastures produced high volume milk cows and high grade butter that lasted longer than eastern product.
...1877...John Stewart became the founding President of the Northern Iowa Butter and Cheese Association.
...1878...Iowa had taken the lead in butter-making.  From 1860-1870 the number of Iowa cows doubled, and doubled again 1870-1880, to 730,000. 
....Iowa butter took a large number of prices at the 1st New York International Dairy Fair.  The Monticello.IA creamery won, "the best butter of any kind made at any time and place,"
......Creamery grade butter would be regularly shipped between Iowa and the New York market.
...1879...At the 2nd International, Iowa butter took 15 of 32 prizes.

...1880...The Ellis & Son's Co of Boston (produce merchants) started the first creamery in Fayette village, The Crown Creamery.
...1880>1890...Creameries (dairies) entered a 4th stage, a more centralized machinery-capital intensive business, rather than small, scattered, labor intensive enterprises.
.....High prices for fine butter in the N.Y./Boston market provided the motivation for Iowa creameries/butter-factories, from farmer to buttermaker.
.......Increased efficiency, precision, science would replace older ways of handling milk and dairy products.
...1882...The first commercial centrifugal cream separator came to Iowa, allowing cream separation in 13+ minutes rather than the 24hrs needed for milk to sit, then the cream skimmed off the top or the skim milk drained of the bottom of a container or vat.
...1884...The Fayette Crown Creamery would get a commercial size cream separator.
......By 1890, most creameries had installed cream separators which decreased labor and increased product quality
...1887...The DeLaval.Co of Sweden patented their hand separator (invented 1878), with a factory built in America 1888.
...1898...There was only 904 hand separators in Iowa by 1898, but by 1905, 49,130 were on the farms
...1900+...Farm separators came into wide use which reduced the work of hauling milk to creameries, and adding the use of the skim milk for hogs and calves.
.....Creameries and hand separators reduced the burden of farm wives, caring for milk and making butter for family/sale.  Also chicken and egg production rapidly increased.
.....Livestock raising would be emphasized in the 'corn belt,' thus butter making dominated over cheese making, with increased consolidation of butter-making and dairy.
...Overview (continued) in, "Little Dairy on the Prairie From Butter-makin’ Women to High-tech Agriculture,"  2005 (30+ pages, good overview, with some pics of the early  dairy/creamery industry in NE Iowa). 
https://iowadot.gov/ole/documents/Dairyontheprairie.pdf

Back to menu.


Orear family farm dairy operation,
the first in Fayette County, Iowa, 1842-1846 (map below)

William Orear & James Beatty started a dairy operation in 1842, but Beatty left the next year.
William & Mary nee Wilcox Orear operated the first dairy farm/creamery in Fayette County, Iowa, about 1843-1846.
At the Wilcox 'settlement' area on the Mission Trail, 2mi SxSW of today's Main.St, Fayette village.
Milking 20-30 cows, supplying milk, butter, cheese to the Mission (St.Lucas) & Fort Atkinson in Winnesheik.Co.IA.

The first cabins in Fayette.Co.IA, were on or near the Mission Trail running from Strawberry.Pt in Clayton.Co. to the Mission (today's St.Lucas) & Ft. Atkinson in Winneshiek.Co).
...1840...Joseph Hewitt built a cabin/trading.post on the Mission Tail, close to the Clayton & Fayette Co. line.
....1840...Franklin Wilcox (1815/NY-1850/CA) built the first cabin in Fayette.Co.IA, a double wide log cabin, on the Mission Trail, 2mi SxSW of today's Main.St.Fayette.   Wilcos left Fayete.Co in 1843; went to Oregon with father & sibling 1847; 1849, went to CA to mine for gold.
.....The 2nd cabin, also in 1840, of a Mr. Grambly, was 5/8mi W of the Wilcox cabin (the one burned down at the 'Teagardner Massacre, a few years later.
....1841...The 3rd cabin in Fayette.Co was built by Mr. Mumford on Brush Creek, 1.4mi N of today's Arlington.IA (Mumford moved out of the county in 1843).  Culver's Trading post a mile east of today's Wadena was built about the same time as Mumford's cabin or a bit later.
....1842Spring...The 4th cabin was of two younger men, Wm. Orrear (Orear, O'Rear) & James Beatty, across the Mission Trail, just south and a bit west of the Wilcox cabin.  The three cabins in the Wilcox area, constituted the 'Wilcox Settlement,' along the Mission Trail. 
....1843...Madison Brown, 5th cabin.
....1844...Andrew Hensley, 6th cabin, a few miles east of the Wilcox Settlement; Andrew would move onto the Volga River flowage at Lima, when the Neutral Ground about/north of the Mission Trail opened to white settlers, in 1848/49, and become the only earliest 'cabin builder' to remain in Fayette.Co.
....1845, Daniel Finney built a cabin in Fayette.Co, followed by Moines, Brooks, Newton.

The First Frontier Dairy Operation in Fayette.Co.IA:   1842>1843, James Beatty & Wm. Orear; 1844>1845,  Wm. Orear & wife Mary Wilcox
...1842Spring...Remember, Wm. Orear & James Beatty built a mutual cabin across from the Wilcox cabin, 2mi S of 'Fayette.'
.....It can be assumed they had brought some livestock and cows up the Mission Trail and started a dairy operation 1842>1843, as by 1844, Wm. Orear was running a frontier creamery with his wife Mary Wilcox and likely the few others in the area helping.
...1843Fall...James Beatty, 'snuck' over the Neutral line, and built a cabin in with today's is he SW area of Fayette.  Wm. Orear bought out Beatty's part of their claim about this time.
...1844Feb25...Wm. Orear married Mary Angelina Wilcox, in Fort Atkinson.  Williams' father Elias Orear was government blacksmith at the Fort Atkinson, plus was assigned to teach farming to Indians.
...1844...Wm. & Mary Orear erected a bigger/better house and probably improved on some outbuildings.
.....1844-1846...Orear frontier dairy operation/creamery:  Wm. & Mary Wilcox Orear, and likely members of the Wilcox family and visitors/travelers, were milking 20-30 cows, making butter and cheese, and transporting product to the Mission and Ft.Atkinson.  It can be assumed Beatty & Orear brought cows up with them from Delaware.Co and milking in 1842-1843.  Note:  The Orear operation was in a totally natural habitat so livestock would have been fed exclusively by pasturing on natural prairie grasses during the growing season and collected prairie hay during cold months.

Back to menu.


Some early Fayette County Iowa dairy attempts during 1860s>1870s

...1860's>early 1870's: Some of the early farm/family creamery operations that sprang up in Fayette.Co.IA, and a few cooperative creameries that went into operation, leading to Fayette.Co becoming a leading county in butter production and shipping. 
...Cream checks started supplying a constant, secure income source for running a farm operation, rather running credit until crops could be sold. 
...Increased dairying and stock raising resulted in increased farmer prosperity, buildings and machinery were added and the farmsteads grew.

…Gilson’s Home Dairy, O.L., The Oliver L. Gilson family, early/mid 1860's, milked 20-30 cows, produced cheese, made butter in winter/spring (6mi E on West.Union-Elkader Ridge Road, in SW corner of P.Val.Twp & NW corner of Illyria.Twp).
….C.G. Wheeland, b. 1828/VT, 400a, Sec 8, Fairfield.Twp, sold $10k of butter since 1865 from their farm creamery.  Sold 2,100lb of butter 1877.  Begam erecting a new creamery, capable  handling milk from 300 cows.
.....P.L. Roland operated an early 1860's dairy for several years on his farm in Dover.Twp.
.....Andrew Jackson Miller for a short time, ran an early 1870's creamery in Jefferson.Twp, milking up to 31 cows, churning butter by horse power, producing up to 100lb/day, taking it into Strawberry.Pt, selling to highest bidder.

….Brush Creek (Arlington) Creamery; Fairfield.Twp,
 Walrath & Hemingway.. 
….E.B. Little farm creamery in Putnam.Twp.
….Brayton & Castle farm creamery in Scott.Twp.
….C.G. Wheeland farm creamery in Scott.Twp.
….J.A. Harris farm creamery in Scott.Twp.
....D.P. Moody Creamery in Waucoma, Eden.Twp, est.1876 (1889>Farmers Creamery Co; 1909>re-incorporated).
….Long Grove Creamery (Maynard, started 1875Dec), Harlan.Twp, E. B. Snedigar, Sec, operated by S. Shilling of Manchester, collects 6,000lb/day of milk.
…..The Long Grove Dairymen Assoc. incorporated 1875Dec, followed in a couple of years erecting a 18x30’, 2 story with basement, creamery, at $1,600.

….Oelwein Creamery, a large ‘factory’, Jefferson.Twp. In the 1878 flood, the Oelwein creamery basement filled with water, $200 worth of milk and butter were ruined.
  The milkpans and butter kegs were floating.  The loss was $500.
…Clermont & West.Union Cheese Factory, Mr. Melvin an owner, in charge, produces 300lb cheese/day.
  West.Union received 7,000lbs/day of milk.
…Creamery butter brings half again better price than the best made by farmers’ wives.
  We expect creamery numbers to double in a year and keep increasing.

Back to menu.


 

 Abstract of Assessment of Fayette Co. for 1875
...1875July23, West.Union.IA paper:  (Note:  RR are just entering the county which would begin the 'boom' years of growth for the farm market.)
.....Lands exclusive of town property:  400,875a, valuation=$3,016,918.
.....Aggregate value of RR property= $269,360.
.....Aggregate value of personal property= $970,048.
.....Aggregate value of property in towns= $272,426.
.....Aggregate value of livestock= $563,209.
.....Towns, cities & villages:  Auburn $11,620; Randalia $1,383; Clermont $47,105; Eldorado $3,104; Taylorsville, Centerville, Brush Creek $13,339; Maynard $4089; Wadena $1,780; Oelwein $6,354; Elgin & Lutra $23,792; Albany & Lima $1,123; West.Union $73,033; Fayette $72,539.  Aggregate town value=$272,426.
.....Livestock: Cattle assessed  21,596 head at $174,564; horses 9,416 at $342,423; mules 403 at $14,419; sheep 8,311 at $6,123; swine 10,317 at $23,670.

Return to top


The Brush Creek Creamery,
operational 1877spring>1893, started by locals Walrath & Hemingway.

...An example of an early Fayette.Co.IA, creamery operation of the same time frame and similar to the Ellis Co. Crown Creamery at Fayette village.
...Was re-organized in 1893, as a cooperative creamery, similar to what happened at Fayette, 9mi NW on the same rail line.
...Note: Brush Creek village's name was changed to Arlington in 1895.

What was going on at the Brush Creek Creamery?
….Operational in the Spring of 1877, The Brush Creek Creamery was built for $1,200 with apparatus.
….One story wooden building 24x62’, with a cement floor.
….First room; churns & a chain pump giving a good supply of cold water.  A horse treadmill supplied the power for the churns and pump, all built locally.
….Receiving platform for cans from farmer’s wagons was on the south side.
….Milk was emptied from farmers' containers into a tin receptacle for weighing.
....The weight of milk was recorded at the weigher's desk, also in the farmer's log book.
….Patrons were paid at the end of each month.
….After weighing the milk was dipped from the receiving tank into strainer-pails (a pipe was to be installed to reduce the labor of dipping milk).
….In the west room (left side of pic), the milk was set (left to stand up to a day to allow the cream to collect from the skim milk), using 5 large vats, each long enough to hold seven 4’x2’x10” pans.
….The pans were going to be gradually replaced by (tall milk) pails having a depth of 20”. 
….A pipe from the chain pump brought cold water that flowed around the pans for cooling.  In the summer, ice was used to keep the temperature down.
….The cream was skimmed off the top the pans/pails as it become noticeably sour.
….The cream was then churned by two revolving churns worked by horse power.
….The buttermilk was drawn from the churns into a cistern, where it was pumped into cans for farmers purchase to feed  pigs.
….The butter was carefully washed to remove all traces of buttermilk, and a proper proportion of Ashton salt worked into the butter.   
.......Note:  Ashton or dairy salt, is salt of high purity, being at least 98% NaCl, and serves to add flavor, hold moisture, act as a preservative.
….The butter was packed into wooden tubes that had been soaked to remove the flavor of wood.
….The tub covers were nailed on, and stenciled with name of the creamery and to whom consigned.
….Nearly all the early Iowa butter that shipped out by rail went to the New York market, and later to the Chicago market.
….In 1878May, Brush Creek Creamery received 7,000lb of milk daily, patrons delivered their milk twice a day.
….Patrons were paid 50c to $1 per 100lbs for whole milk, depending on the season.
….The amount of butterfat varied from 3.5% in warm weather and 4.5% in cold weather when the cows were fed more grain.

...In 1893, the creamery in Brush Creek re-organized as a cooperative and a new creamery was built near the depot in the north side of the village.
.....The new creamery was powered by a small static steam engine rather than the horse treadmill of the first creamery.
.....By this time rural cream routes had been organized, with milk brought by route haulers to the creamery in 10gal cans.
.....With the village name change, the new creamery became, the Arlington Cooperative Creamery, with a 6 person board, buttermaker & wife, and helper.
...During the early decades of Fayette.Co.IA, there were numerous attempts to set up rural and village creameries which were not successful for any length of time for various reasons to include not enough patrons or manufacturing poor products. 

Return to top


  


The First Fayette Creamery, ~1880>1887
The Crown Creamery (Ellis Creamery), owners David Ellis & Son's of Boston
(Notes below show location & description of the operation, followed by timeline notes)

The Crown Creamery was a major creamery for the time, but apparently was struggling by about 1886. 
Although management seems to have been blamed, likely involved were national economics and local patron numbers.

...Located...Half a mile north of the Main.Street bridge, on the road to West.Union; to locals, in 'Canada' on the site of the big spring of the 'cracker' brewery.
...1879...the creamery was probably up and running after modifications to the old brewery.
...1880...the Crown Creamery at Fayette.IA was operational, initially buying cream & shortly whole milk from local farmers, then producing and shipping butter by rail to the New.York and Boston market.
.....The Ellis Co. (brothers David and Jonathan, & their sons from Cambriage.MA), were major butter/cheese/egg/produce merchants in the Boston/New.York commercial market.
.....David Ellis & Son's, started numerous frontier creameries in Iowa to include at Fayette & Maynard (an Ellis descendent tree is near the end of the page).
.....The Crown Creamery bought the old 'Sherman' Hotel building on the SE corner of Main/Water, to use as an area office and rented out rooms (later Peterman's insurance/real-estate office/apartments).
...One can only speculate at the success of the Crown Creamery by following the few items mentioned below from newspapers.
...By the end of 1887, the Crown Creamery was out of commission and a coop of local farmers formed the Fayette Creamery Association, built and put the second Fayette creamery into operation from 1889>1919, at the east end of Water.St.


 

The Crown Creamery Building:
...Originally the old brewery structure, 20x40 ft, two stories.  The lower story was a  cooling room over the open spring water, the upper floor used for processing milk/cream & manufacturing butter.  Note:  No pictures exist of the old brewery or Crown Creamery.
...1880summer...A 30x40 ft additional building was erected nearby.

The Spring Cooling Room:
...The Crown Creamery became one of largest and best arranged early creameries in Iowa, but was successful only a few years during the 1880/1888 time period.
...The 'brewery spring' ran under the building, forming a cool pool surrounded by 2' planks, being 22" deep by 12x22', of moving 45-47 deg. water, year-round.
...The 'cooling pool' could hold 500 nine-gallon milk pails/cans, keeping milk 'sweet' up to 2 1/2 days while cream was allowed to settle to the top.
...Butter was stored in a corner ice box (river ice, collected in winter) in one corner of the cooling room, until it was shipped by rail to the Boston & New York market in wooden tubs surrounded by river ice.

 

Description of the Crown Creamery operation (at Fayette):  (West.Union.IA paper, 1881July).
The Middle Room of the Crown Creamery:
....The middle room is where the butter was worked and packed, and also where the cream is deposited, being held in four 150-gal vats.
....From the vats the cream was taken into an adjoining room, which was used exclusively for churning purposes.
....There are two barrel churns, one with a 150-lb capacity, the other 200-lb capacity, and a box churn of 200-lb capacity.
....Power for revolving the churns is supplied by steam power.
......Note: the steam engine would have been supplied by Joseph Marvin, from Marvin's Mill at the north end of the Fayette bridge.  Because of the Marvin family being early millwrights and getting into steam power, and the Knight family of wheelwrights/blacksmiths and steam millers, Fayette had a ready source of steam expertise.
....Butter was produced in the churns in an hour's time.
....Adjoining the churning room the initial engine room.
....A new engine house had just been built a few feet away from the old engine room, and already had a 10hp stationary boiler, which will furnish steam for the new 6 horse power steam engine.
....Adjoining the new engine house is a new coal-shute holding 3 cars (railroad) of coal.
....Half the upper story of the building is used for empty butter tubs, which are manufactured at North Lawrence, NY, from selected spruce lumber, and are shipped here by the rail car load.
....The other half of the upper story will soon be finished for a cheese curing room.  Frank Ellis says he expects to commence the manufacture of cheese in a few days.
....The butter press and 600gal vat will occupy a place in the cooling apartment (spring room).
....Around the inside of the building are steam pipes for heating purposes in winter and warming water when necessary.
....The exterior of the creamery has a nice appearance, painted in good style and inscribed conspicuously with:  "Crown Creamer, D. Ellis & Co., Boston, Mass, proprietors."
....Adjacent to the building are 2 large reservoirs for butter milk and sour skimmed milk.
....H.G. Pert, the supt., assisted personally be Frank Ellis (son of David), junior member of the firm, are doing their utmost to build up a good, legitimate and permanent business.   The firm has already paid out for building and materials over $5,000, and are willing to invest more capital if it be necessary to further the interest of the creamery.
....Barney Quigley is foreman, and assisted by three other men, who are kept busy in the manufacture of butter.
....This institution/creamery, has been running a trifle over a year (since spring 1880), and from the start the proprietors have been constantly making additions and improvements.
....They are gradually discarding the system of gathering cream and intend to work into nothing but whole milk.  This, we believe to be strictly the only way in which the creamery and farmer have equal chances for profits, while in just gathering cream the gains are on the wrong side, the manufacturer.
.....Some people think the creameries are getting rich.   The books of the Crown Creamery showed in early May, that it had sunk a considerable sum of money, and there are other creameries in the county that lost still greater sums.
....The creamery enterprises have not been profitable investments the past months.  The only remedy that we can see is to return to the milk system.
....Milk patrons have informed us that they get 15-25% more (income) in milk, than if they sold their cream.
....With the unequalled facilities that Crown Creamery has for handling and caring for milk, particularly the cooling properties, it can prove to the farmers, if a fair trial is made, that it is to his interest to sell milk.
...Note:  Farm cream separators  the 1890's.  Cream cream would often became the product of choice to send to the creameries so as to keep the skim milk for livestock feeding.  Later on in the 1960's, whole milk collected by tank trunks returned as the product of choice to collect as family dairy farms & local creamereis rapidly began disappearing in the 1960's.

 


 

Time-line notes:  The Crown Creamery, Fayette.IA, 1880>1887

...By 1878...The beer brewery at the big spring, north of Main.St, Fayette.IA, had gone out of business.  Likely the result of not only local pressure in a Methodist town, but also the Iowa prohibition movement/laws, which forced the operational and financial demise of nearly all local Iowa breweries and distilleries by the early 1880's.
...1881...The first mention of the Crown Creamery in the West.Union.IA paper.

...1870+...With the coming of the rails into Fayette.Co.IA, there was rapid, functional transportation toward the eastern markets.  Dairy herds became a major source of farm income.  Cream could be separated from milk and turned into butter which could be shipped by rail.  Thus numerous creameries were constructed from the mid-1870's, through the 1880's, along with several cheese factories that also would produce butter in the off season.  In a search of the West.Union.IA paper, the first time the word 'creamery' appears was 1874Oct.

...1874Oct23, West.Union.IA paper:  Brush Creek (Arlington) news; G.L. Wheeland is determined to start a creamery on his farm the coming season.

...1874Nov20, West.Union.IA paper:  C.G. Wheeland, of Putnam.Twp, possesses a farm that is a sample of what many Iowa farms are and can be.  He owns 400a, has 100 head of cattle, many of them thoroughbred Durham cattle.  He milks 40 cows, and intends next season to build a creamery, or butter factory.  He also makes a specialty of Berkshire swine, and has a drove of fine specimens of that breed of hogs.

...1876Jul28, West.Union.IA paper:  The farmers of Maynard have built a creamery upon the joint stock plan.

...1876Aug18, West.Union.IA paper:  Brush Creek (Arlington) is becoming quite famous as a butter market; it having shipped more this season than any other town on this line of the railroad.  There are good prospects for a creamery in Brush Creek next summer.

...1876Nov, Dubuque.IA paper:  (Example)  We met with A.R. Dickey of Hazel Green, Delaware.Co.IA.  His butter manufacturing company now has two factories, with a capacity to use milk of 800 cows.  The purchase milk from farmers at from 79c to $1.10/hundred lbs, according to the season.  They manufacture only what is known in the eastern market as creamery butter, all marketed in New York City, brining 40c/lb.  At present they ship about 900lbs per week.  Mr. Dickey says many farmers where these factories are established are turning their farms exclusively into dairy farms, constantly increasing the number of their cows.

...1877June01, West.Union.IA paper:  (Example) Often several local farmers were group together to form a creamery.  Five farmers are running a creamery in Delaware.Co.  They hired an experienced buttermaker, and pay him 2.5c/lb for manufacturing butter.  They furnish him 1200lb of milk per day and buy all they can from neighbors at 70c/100lb.  They ship their butter direct to New York City.

...1881...The first time the Crown Creamery in Fayette.IA is mentioned in the West.Union paper.

...1881Feb02, West.Union.IA paper:  Fayette news; E. Frank Ellis, one of the proprietors of the Crown Creamery, arrived from his home in Boston.  He intends to make the business of the Crown lively this coming season.  H.G. Pert, who has been in the employ of Davie Ellis & Co., at Sioux City, has arrived in Fayette and is to take charge of their Crown Creameries' interest in this part of Iowa.  He will make his headquarters in Fayette.

...1881Feb02, West.Union.IA paper:  Fayette news, Advertisement;  David Ellis & Co., Boston, Mass., Commission Merchants, for the sale of Butter, Cheese, Etc., strict attention give to fine butter, proprietors of Crown Creamery, Fayette.IA.

...1881Feb16, West.Union.IA paper:  A bell telephone has been ordered which will connect the Depot with the Fayette House Hotel and the Crown Creamery (office on SE corner Main/Water).

...1881Mar02, West.Union.IA paper:  Fayette news; David Ellis & Co., have bought the Sprague House (old Sherman Hotel building on the NW corner of Main/Water), the papers having been transferred.  We hope they will put a Block on the south side, as there is some talk of now.  Frank Ellis (son of David1817 Ellis, a major butter, cheese, egg produce dealer from Cambridge, Middlesex.Co.MA) of Crown Creamery, leaves today for his home in Boston.  Supt. H.G. Pert will attend to the Crown business here.

...1881Mar02, West.Union.IA paper:  Mr. Quigley, of the Crown Creamery, fell through a hatchway, putting his shoulder out of place. 
...1881Mar04, West.Union.IA paper:  The Sprague house has passed into the hands of Ellis & Co., of the Crown Creamery, and today occupied by Frank Francisco.
...1881Mar09, West.Union.IA paper:  If you have cows to lease call on Sup't Pert at the Crown Creamery in Fayette.

...1881Mar16, West.Union.IA paper:  The Crown Creamery has a steam butter worker (steam engine to power the churns, etc.)

...1881Mar23, West.Union.IA paper:  Fayette news;  In more than 4yrs, Pete Widger had only failed once in carrying mail between Fayette and Wadena (through Albany & Lima).  He gathers cream along the way for the Crown Creamery.

...1881Apr13, West.Union.IA paper:  Crown Creamery is doing a rushing business these days, making 1,000 to 1,200 pounds of butter per day.  The 'boys' have made as high as 1,500 pounds in one day.

...1881Apr20, West.Union.IA paper:  Fayette news; Work has been resumed on the excavation at the Crown Creamery, preparatory to the erection to the building of an addition--increasing business  necessitating more room.

...1881Apr27, West.Union.IA paper:  A (rail) carload of the Ashton salt has arrived for the Crown Creamery.
......Note:  Ashton salt or dairy salt is used in the manufacture of butter and cheese, serving to add flavor and acting as a preservative.  In butter it helps retain moisture; in cheeses it helps reduce the water content, slowing the ripening process.  Dairy salt has a high level of purity of sodium chloride (NaCl), in the 98-99% range.

...1881May04, West.Union.IA paper:  Randalia news; Adam Proctor is now employed in the Crown Creamery at Fayette.

...1881June01, West.Union.IA paper:  Fayette news; The excavation for the addition to the Crown Creamery, having been made, the stone work is now in course of erection.  Mr. Davie Ellis, of Crown Creamery arrived from the Boston area.  We are glad to see him among us again.

...1881June08, West.Union.IA paper:  Fayette news; During the past ten days, 275 tubs of butter have been shipped from the Depot to eastern market by the Crown Creamery.
...1881June08, West.Union.IA paper:  Advertisement; David Ellis & Co., Boston, Mass, Commission Merchants for the sale of Butter, Cheese, Etc.  Strict attention given to Fine Butter.  Proprietors of the Crown Creamery, Fayette.IA.

...1881Jul13, West.Union.IA paper:   Nine months have elapsed (1880Oct>1881July) since we gave an account of the Crown Creamery in Fayette.  David Ellis of Boston was in Fayette and inspected the work his son Frank Ellis, who has been doing in the creamery business.  He was pleased with our country and Crown Creamery, this being his first visit....The Ellis building is being painted, which will add greatly to its outside appearance.
...1881Jul13, West.Union.IA  paper:  Fayette news; Crown Creamery at Fayette.
....The Crown Creamery has nearly doubled in size in since the last visit 9m ago.
....Originally 20x40 ft, and two stories.
....Erected has been an addition of 30x40 ft, giving the proprietors, Davie Ellis & Co. of Boston.MA, one of the largest and mot conveniently arranged creamery building in the country.
....There gushes out from under the creamery one of the coolest springs of living, sparkling water to be found anywhere. Water runs almost the width and length of the building.
....At one end is the cooling pool, which is 12x22' & 22" deep, having a capacity of 3,342gals of water. 
....There is constantly running into this pool, the cold, spring water, which, in summer has an even temperature of 47deg, in winter 45deg.
....The bottom and sides of the pool are made of 2 inch planks.
....The pool is large enough to hold five-hundred, 9gal mild pails/cans.  We have been told milk has been kept sweet for over 60hrs.
....A temporary ice box (natural river ice) occupies one corner of the room, in which butter is stored after being paced and kept until shipped to the eastern market.
....The middle room is where the butter is worked and packed, and also where the cream is deposited, being held in four 150gal vats.
....From the vats the cream is taken into an adjoining room, which is used exclusively for churning purposes.
....There are 2 barrel churns, one with a 150lb capacity, the other 200lb capacity, and a box churn of 200lb capacity.
....Power for revolving the churns is supplied by steam power.
....Butter is produced in these burns in an hour's time.
....Adjoining the churning room if the present engine room.
....A new engine house has just been built a few feet away from the old engine room, and already has a 10hp stationary boiler, which will furnish steam for the new 6 horse power steam engine.
....Adjoining the new engine house is a new coal chute holding 3 car loads (railroad) of coal.
....Half the upper story of the building is used for empty butter tubs, which are manufactured at North Lawrence, NY, from selected spruce lumber, and are shipped here by the car load.
....The other half of the upper story will soon be finished for a cheese curing room.  Frank Ellis says he expects to commence the manufacture of cheese in a few days.
....The butter press and 600gal vat will occupy a place in the cooling apartment.
....Around the inside of the building are steam pipes for heating purposes in winter and warming water when necessary.
....The exterior of the creamery has a nice appearance, painted in good style and inscribed conspicuously with:  "Crown Creamer, D. Ellis & Co., Boston, Mass, proprietors."
....Adjacent to the building are 2 large reservoirs for butter milk and sour skimmed milk.
....H.G. Pert, the supt., assisted personally be Frank Ellis, junior member of the firm, are doing their utmost to build up a good, legitimate and permanent business.   The firm has already paid out for building and materials over $5,000, and are willing to invest more capital if it be necessary to further the interest of the creamery.
....Barney Quigley is foreman, and assisted by three other men, who are kept busy in the manufacture of butter.
....This institution, has been running a trifle over a year (Spring of 1880), and from the start the proprietors have been constantly making additions and improvements.
....They are gradually discarding the system of gathering cream and intend to work into nothing but milk.  This, we believe to be strictly the only way in which the creamery and farmer have equal chances for profits, while in just gathering cream the gains are on the wrong side, the manufacturer.
.....Some people think the creameries are getting rich.   The books of the Crown Creamery showed in early May, that it had sunk a considerable sum of money, and there are other creameries in the county that lost still greater sums.
....The creamery enterprises have not been profitable investments the past months.  The only remedy that we can see is to return to the milk system.
....Milk patrons have informed us that they get 15-25% more in milk, than if they sold their cream.
....With the unequalled facilities that Crown Creamery has for handling and caring for milk, particularly the cooling properties, it can prove to the farmers, if a fair trial is made, that it is to his interest to sell milk.

...1881Jul20, West.Union.IA paper:  Fayette news; Frank Ellis (son of David), after two months in Fayette, working on the Crown Creamery project, will return back to his home in Boston.  Mr. Pert, the efficient and gentlemanly superintendent, will look to the welfare of the Crown Creamery.

...1881July27, West.Union.IA paper:  Fayette news, Real Estate Transfer;  C.A. Austin to D. & D.F. Ellis, undiv Lots 13&14 (SE corner of Main/Water) & Lots 1-5 (NE side) in Bk 6, Fayette, $240. 
.....Note:  The Ellis Co. used this structure as an office for their various creamery businesses of the 1880's in the area to include Fayette and Maynard.  This building was moved up to the Fayette plat from the Westfield plat in the 1860's and utilized as the Sherman Hotel, with a grocery and merchant shop in part of the first floor, before, during and after the Ellis Co. ownership.  After Ellis Co ownership, Thomas Peterman would acquire the building for his attorney and real estate office, with apartments/rooms and grocery.  In the 1900's the building would be used as apartments, falling in disrepair, being torn down and replaced by a modern style brick grocery in the late 1960's.

...1881Aug17, West.Union.IA paper:  Barney Quigley manages the (milk/cream) "routes' of the Crown Creamery business.  Some of the fine views (opinions) (editor) Orvis took (has) of the Crown Creamery will be sent to Europe.

...1881Sep09, Sumner.IA paper:  Randalia news; M. Wolsey will be entering employ of John Barkey of West.Union, taking the cream on his route, that formerly has been used by the Crown Creamery of Fayette.
...1881Nov19, Postville.IA paper:  North Eastern Iowa Creamery Association, Postville.IA, 1881Nov16;  A preliminary organizational meeting of the creamery men of NE Iowa was held at Postville. were:
....Lime Springs Creamery, A.J.W. Pierce.
....Cresco Creamery of Caward & Caswell, J.B. Caward.
....Cresco Creamery of Plat & O'Malley, P.F. O'malley.
....Ice Cave Creamery of Decorah, L.W. Beard & Sons.
....Ossian Creamery, C.W. Williams.
....Elkader Creamery, C.W. Stearns.
....West.Union, J.H. Berkey & Co, Atlantic Creamery, J.A. Berkey.
....Fayette, Crown Creamery of David Ellis & Co, H.G. Pert.
....Beulah Creamery, Fred Fraulich.
....West.Union, Hoyt, Shaw & Co.
....Waucoma Creamery, D.P. Moody.
....Waukon Creamery, L.Hubbell.

...1881Dec02, West.Union.IA paper:  Report of the 2nd meeting of the N.E. Iowa Creamery Association, held at Calmar.IA, 1881Nov23.
....Creameries represented:  Wm. Beard & Sons of Decorah, J.E. Berkey & Co. of West.Union, Caward & Caswell of Cresco, David Ellis & Co. of Fayette, Hoyt, Shaw & Co. of West.Union, G.W. Kennedy of Garnavillo, McFarland & Co. of Lawler, D.P. Moody & Co. of Waucoma, Gardner Murphy & Co. of Sumner, Platt & O'malley of Cresco, C.F. & H.C. Stearns of Elkader, C.W. Williams & Co. of Ossian.
....Farmers are looking to the creamery system as a profitable branch of the farm.  Its permanent success depends on the quality of the product manufactured.  The character of N.E. Iowa butter is still-forming, as are the habits and customs of its creameries and their patrons.
....Rule 1:  Any patron selling milk from unhealthy cows or from cows while still feverish from calving, will be dropped and reported to authorities.
....Rule 2:  Cream will not be accepted from cows allowed to drink stagnant/foul water, or eat cleanings from horse stables, cabbage, turnips, onions, or anything that will taint milk.
....Rule 3:  Cream from milk showing careless and uncleanly milking or containing insects or dirt of any kind, will not be accepted.
....Rule 4:  Patrons are required to use tine pails to milk in, and to strain their milk through a double strainer of wire & cloth.
....Rule 5:  Milk vessels must be cleaned by first washing, then scalding and airing to keep them perfectly sweet, and the tanks must be kept perfectly fresh and clean.
....Rule 6:  Milk should be kept out of vegetable cellars & the milk's surroundings kept free from all odors & impurities.
....Rule 7:  No tainted, sour or frozen cream will be received/accepted.
....Rule 8:  No farmer/collector will in any case, take any cream except what he himself skims from the cans.
....Rule 9:  Any patron discovered tampering with cream in any fraudulent way will be dropped and subject to the law.
....Rule 10: Cream from milk standing in low temperature is thin and will not hold out.  such cream will not be taken unless proper reduction be made.  The proper temperature for milk to stand in is from 50-60deg; and to make honest cream milk should stand from _____ to _____ hours in summer, from _____ to _____ hours in winter before skimming.
....Rule 11: Ice & snow are detrimental to cream, and when used in milk, the cream will not be taken.
....Rule12: Two different milkings must not be put into the same can, nor must the milk or can be disturbed after the milk is set.
....Rule13: The length of time milk must stand before skimming will depend upon the conditon of the cream, which will in all cases be determined by the collector, who must be the judge of his own route.
....Rule14: It is to be understood that when the work 'inch' is used, it is the equivalent of a pound of butter, and the creameries reserve to themselves the right to pay any parton for the number of pounds his cream will make.
....Rule15: Patrons/farmers are requested to notify their creameries at once of any neglect of their collectors, or any failure on their part to conform with the rules.

...1882Nov07, West.Union.IA paper:  Advertisement; David Ellis and Co., Boston, Mass, Commission Merchants for the sale of Butter, Cheese, etc.  Strict attention given to fine butter.  Proprietors of Crown Creamery, Fayette, Iowa.

...1882Feb03, West.Union.IA paper:  Mr. Pert, the Crown Creamery man, has taken the richness off Iowa cream by going back to St.Larence.Co (New York), for a wife.

...1883Feb13, Fayette.IA paper:  Ad; David Ellis and Co., Boston, Mass, Commission Merchants for the sale of Butter, Cheese, etc.  Strict attention given to fine butter.  Proprietors of Crown Creamery, Fayette, Iowa.

...1883Mar30, West.Union.IA paper:  Fayette news; Mr. Ellis from Boston is in Fayette.

...1883Apr03, Fayette.IA paper:  A new plank sidewalk from the Fayette House (Hotel) to the Crown Creamery offices (along the east side of Main.St, from State to Water) would be a fine thing if it could be laid on a solid foundation.
...1883Apr10, Fayette.IA paper:  V.L. Johnson & Co, have purchased the stock of goods at the Corner Grocery, opposite the Crown Creamery office (in the same building, SE corner Main/Water) where they have opened out and will keep in stock at all times. 
....NOTE:  The Crown Creamery headquarters was in the old Lamb/Sherman Hotel on the SE corner of Water & Main. 

...1883Apr17, Fayette.IA paper:  We have just  printed some egg checks for David Ellis & Co, that are as good as the gold to those who have eggs to sell.  Note:  The Ellis.Co of Boston were produce wholesale dealers not only in butter, cheese, but also eggs

...1883apr17, Fayette.IA paper:  Attention Dairymen; We are now taking milk at our Creamery in Smithfield.Twp (Sec20), located on what is known as the Gaynor farm.  Our aim is to make this the best market for the milk from the farms tributary to it, and to this end ask the hearty support of the farmers in that vicinity.  We guarantee fair and liberal dealing and a cash settlement each month.  David Ellis & Co. Per Fred M. Brush, Supt'.  Note:  An attempt to expand the Ellis creamery business in the Fayette/Maynard area.

...1883Aug02, Fayette.IA paper:  A car (railroad) load of butter tubs, one of salt and three of coal are on hand for the Crown Creamery.

...1884Jan18, West.Union.IA paper: The Ellis Creameries at Fayette and Maynard made and shipped 3,500 tubs, or 175,000lbs of butter (50lb/tub) during the months of June, July, August, September 1883.

...1884Feb15, West.Union.IA paper:  Maynard news; Frank Cumming has engaged with David Ellis & Co, to run their creamery near Smithfield Center, the coming season.

...1884Apr22, West.Union.IA paper:  Maynard news; The Ellis Creamery at Maynard is undergoing important changes and repairs, including a new steam engine and a patent cream exactor (separator), which will increase its capacity for business. 

...1884Jun10, West.Union.IA paper:  At Maynard; Under the guidance of E.B. Snedigar, we visited the Ellis Creamery and witnesses the operation of a wonderful little machine called a 'cream separator' (commerical size for creamery use). It takes the milk from the fat, as it comes from the farm, and pours the cream out of one pipe and the milk out of another.  It is capable of a speed of 2400 revolutions a minute.  It cost $500.  O. Strickland is Supt. of this creamery, and kindly explained the working of this pet of his.
.....Note:  Up to this time the creamery(s) was letting milk sit in cooling springs until the cream came to the top to be skimmed off and churned into butter.

...1884Jul11, West.Union.IA paper:  Fayette news; The new building of Mr. Ellis is nearly completed.  He has with him now his wife and daughter, with her governess, who will remain a while.

...1886Mar31, West.Union.IA paper:  Mr/Mrs. Fred M. Brush has returned from Calif.  Fred will resume his old place at the Crown Creamery.  He expects to remain in Fayette as long as he keeps good health.

...1886Apr02, West.Union.IA paper:  A new (steam) engine has been set up in the Ellis Creamery at Maynard, and other improvements made, to the joy of proprietor Frank Ellis of Boston.

...1886Jun04, West.Union.IA paper:  Fayette news;  The Ellis Creamery at Maynard burned, the loss was heavy, $5k.  Everything connected with the creamery was destroyed, also the ice-house.  The $5,000 loss was partially insured.  Mr. Ellis of Boston, owns the one in Fayette.  The manager, Frank Cummings and family, living in the building, barely escaped.  The fire originated in the engine room.
...1886June25, West.Union.IA paper:  The Ellis Creamery at Maynard is to be rebuilt.  Carpenters are at work.

…1886Oct06, West.Union.IA paper:  The Fayette (Ellis) Creamery has already shut down for the winter, on account of poor business.

...1887Jan14, West.Union.IA paper:  Maynard news;  Jan07, it was 42 deg below zero.  The new ice-house in connection with the Ellis Creamery is being filled with ice of fine quality.

...1887Oct12, Fayette.IA paper:  Mr. Thompson, who is putting down the tile drain from the Crown Creamery cooler to the creek (Volga River!), had the walls of the 7 ft deep trench cave in on him last Thursday, while in a stopping position placing a tile.  It was lively work around that corner for a few minutes, getting the sand removed from over his head so he could breathe.

...1887Oct26, Fayette.IA paper:  Rumors are rife that the Crown Creamery at Fayette, will not again be opened by the Ellis Co.  Whether this is so or only a canard by rival creameries will be known in the course of events.  We have about come to the conclusion, that there has been some first class management within the past three years (1884, 1885, 1886) which would have a tendency to impair its success.

...1887Nov02, West.Union.IA paper:  Fayette news; Rumors are rift that the Crown Creamery will not be again opened by the Ellis Co.  Whether this is so or only a canard by rival creameries will be known in the course of events.  We have come to the conclusion, however, that there has been some first-class mismanagement within the past three years which would have the tendency to impair success.

...1887Dec03, Fayette.IA paper:  Lyme Little, who has been working in the Ellis Creamery (at Fayette) the past few weeks has returned to Strawberry.Pt.

...1887Dec07, West.Union.IA paper:  Maynard news; The Ellis Creamery at Maynard, closed up the first of the week with no prospects of being started by Mr. Ellis before spring at least.  This leaves quite a number of farmers with no place to dispose of their milk, as the Farmers' Creamery now has all the milk they can handle.  There is some talk among farmers of renting the Ellis Creamery.  Whether or not it would pay, but one thing is for certain, it is bad for a farmer this year not to have a place to sell his milk.

...1887Dec24, Fayette.IA paper:  A meeting has been called by posters for next Tues. at the Crown Creamery Office (SE corner of Main/Water) for the purpose of making arrangements for a Farmers' Creamery to be located at or near Fayette.

...1888Jan20, Oelwein.IA paper:  Maynard news; Our farmers are talking of buying the Ellis Creamery and starting another co-operative creamery.  They claim they can start with the milk from 600 cows.
...1888Jan21, Fayette.IA paper:  Maynard news; The Maynard reporter says it looks as though Ellis, Sullivan & Co, were determined to abandon the creamery business in this (Fayette) county.  The farmers in this section (Maynard area), are shut out of selling milk by the closing of the Ellis Creamery, are talking seriously of buying the building and machinery and putting it in operation again.  We understand that they can start up with nearly 700 cows, and if such is the case, we should consider it a number one prospect.  With the exception of last summer there has been plenty of business in Maynard for two creameries, and the past droughty season was no criterion.

...1888Feb08, West.Union.IA paper:  Maynard news;  The farmers who have been figuring on creamery business for some weeks, have completed their organization and purchased the Ellis Creamery.  The name of the organization is the Crown Creamery Association.

...1888Feb11, Fayette.IA paper:  The newly organized farmers' creamery had decided to locate at Randalia.  This, we hear, will result in the re-opening of the Crown Creamery (at Fayette) in the spring by Ellis & Co.

...1888Apr12, Brush.Creek.IA (Arlington) paper:  Smithfield.Twp news;  Parties from Illinois have control of the Crown Creamery at Fayette and the Bear Grove Creamery (local farm creamery in Smithfield.Twp, east of Fayette, south of  Albany/Lima).

...1888Mar14, West.Union.IA paper:  Maynard news; Joe Stansberry assists Jesse Strickland at the Maynard Crown Creamery.  Note:  Maynard had two creameries in operation, the Crown and the Harlan Creameries.

...1888Apr12, Fayette.IA paper:  Smithfield.Twp (south of Westfield.Twp & Fayette village); Parties from Illinois have rented the Crown Creamery at Fayette and the Bear Grove Creamery in Smithfield.Twp.

...1888Apr28, Fayette.IA paper:  The Crown Creamery will not be run this season.  The 'Gentleman from Illinois' who had rented the "Ellis System (Creamery/Creameries)" and part of Wadena, returned to his native haunts over a week ago.  It is said stool pigeons are little better than clay pigeons as a decoy to shot at.  We are sorry it has turned out thus, as one industry for Fayette is thus paralyzed.  It will take many dollars to trade away from this point.

...1888May02, West.Union.IA paper:  Fayette news:  the Crown Creamery will not be opened as stated a short time ago.

...1888May16, West.Union.IA paper:  Several of the milk haulers who have been laboring for the Brush Creek Creamery Co (Arlington), have suspended operations for a few days to give the roads a chance to dry a little.

 ...1888Aug03, Oelwein.IA paper:  Maynard news; A leak in the boiler of the Ellis Creamery was the cause of its patrons having to keep their milk at home a couple of days.

By winter 1888, the Crown Creamery operation in Fayette had ceased to function.

...1889Jan11, West.Union.IA paper:  Maynard news; The stockholders of the Crown Creamery Ass'n (in Maynard), at a meeting called for that purpose, elected the following officers for 1889:  Col. Aaron Brown (of Fayette) Pres; J.C. Lewis, Sec; Wm. s. Brown, Tres.  At the meeting of the Harlan Creamery Assoc. elected were:  Wm. Miehe, Pres; A.F. Crawford, Sec; S.T. Barnes, Treas.

...1889May...The Fayette Creamery Association was incorporated:  Pres. George Whitely, V.P. Finly Smith, Sec. J.W. Winston, Treasurer M.H. Fussell.

...1889Jul12, West.Union.IA paper:  Maynard news; The Harlan Creamery paid 57c for May milk; the Crown Creamery 53c.

...1890Nov28, West.Union.IA paper:  Tax due/sales (land description copied as stated); David Ellis Creamery (Ellis & Co) in Fayette, commencing at a point in Co rd 5 chs 25 lks south, 4 1/2 deg east & 4ch south, 59 1/2 deg east from the NW corner of NE1/4 of SE1/4, in Sec 20, then south 59 1/2deg east along rd 33 rds, south 30 1/2 deg west 18 rds north 59 1/2 deg west 33 rds north 59 1/2 deg east 18 rds to beginning in Sec 20, Westfield.Twp.
NOTE:  The location of the first creamery, the David Ellis Co. Crown Creamery, in Fayette village was at the head of the spring, what was called 'Canada' by the locals, 5/8 mile NW of the corner of Main/Water St's in Fayette.  This location initially was a brewery at the spring.  The Elllis Co, bought the Sherman Hotel on the SE corner of Main/Water to utilize as an office, sales headquarters, living quarters and rent out to businesses, such as a grocery, insurance/real-estate, dentist office. bz/2010

...1891Mar27, West.Union.IA paper:  Maynard news; The Maynard Crown Creamery paid $1.05, the Harlan Creamery paid $1.15 for Feb. milk (per hundred weight).

...1892Jan15, West.Union.IA paper:  The past year the Maynard Crown Creamery sold $18k of butter, and the Harlan Creamery $48k per month, with between $5k & 6k distributed every month to the farmers in the Maynard vicinity.

...1892Mar25, West.Union.IA paper:  Will Doughty will work in the Maynard Crown Creamery this summer.
...1892May20, West.Union.IA paper:  Mr. Smargo has been in charge of the Maynard Crown Creamery he past two years.

...1895Feb15, West.Union.IA paper:  Maynard news;  It may be rather late to announce it, but the Crown Creamery in Maynard is closed.

...1895, Sept27, West.Union.IA paper:  Fayette news;  The old Crown Creamery north of town (Fayette), which for years has been a landmark, and was becoming old enough to be romantic, is being torn to pieces and moved (both not long gone).  Part of it is to make an addition to the Marvin Saw Mill (at the north side/end of the Fayette town bridge), and the other part to George Davis and is to be moved to his lumber yard (the long standing lumber yard location in Fayette, still operational in 2019).

...1895Oct25, West.Union.IA paper:  Fayette news; Part of the old Crown Creamery has just been moved onto Geo. Davis' lumber yard.  Note:  Lumber yard on King.St, still operational in the 2000's.

...1897Apr23, West.Union.IA paper:  Maynard news;  A cooper shop is to be opened by a gentleman from Postville, in the old Maynard Crown Creamery.

...1897Nov19, West.Union.IA paper:  Taxes due;  Maynard Crown Creamery Co, commencing at the SE corner of lot 6, block 27, the east 50ft, then north to the creek, then NW along the creek, to a point parallel with the the east line of lo 6, then north to the north line of the SW1/4 of the SW1/4, W on line 140ft south to NE corner of lot 6, block 27, then SE to beginning in SW1/4 of SW1/4 14  1, in Maynard.

...1898July15, West.Union.IA paper:  Maynard news;  At the sale of the Maynard Crown Creamery, S.F. Rathbone purchased the main building, and W.F. Reese the ice house.
...1898July27, West.Union.IA paper:  Real Estate Movements; Maynard Crown Creamery Co. to L.A. Rathburn, in lot 6, blk27, Maynard, $169.50.

Return to top



The Second Fayette Creamery, 1889>1919

1889, the Fayette Creamery Association formed,  
a co-operation of local farmers put a new creamery into operation on east Water.St, at the north end of Jones.St.

 

 …1889Jun21, West.Union.IA paper:  Fayette Letter (news):  We are obliged to Mr. Dresser for a jug of luscious buttermilk from the Fayette Creamery.

...1889Aug08, Oelwein.IA paper:  Maynard news; Willi Smarzo is now boss butter maker in the Ellis Creamery in Maynard.

...1889Nov15, West.Union.IA paper:  Lima news:  James Hutchinson is now our milk hauler, he having a route through Lima/Albany to the Gilson Creamery
......Note:  The Gilson Creamery was a very early family operation cheese/butter operation on their farm on the 'ridge road' between West.Union and Elkader, directly north of Wadena, in the NW tip of Illyria.Twp & SW tip of Pleasant Valley Twp.  It was one of the very first family diary operations in Fayette.Co.IA, before commerical creameries, taking product before rails by wagon to area villages.  http://www.iowaz.info/surname/gilson.htm

...1890Jan31, Fayette.IA paper:  The Fayette Creamery Association arranging for its year's work, engaging haulers, etc.

...1890Feb14, West.Union.IA paper:  Fayette County Creameries ranks 4th in number of creameries with Delaware & Jones 44 creameries, Dubuque with 34, and Fayette with 32.  Fayette.Co. ranked 3rd in amount of products with; 1888>1,970,646 lbs of butter, 1889>about 15% more. 
......1890 Iowa, has 693 creameries, producing over 41 million lbs. of butter, averaging 21c/lb at market.  In 1889, Iowa had 75 new creameries established.
......1890, there are now 500 cream separators (commerical size) used in the 693 creameries; in 1886 the first separators started to be used.
....Northeastern Iowa has 4/5ths of all Iowa the creameries, making more than 4/5's of all the butter.

...1890, Fayette.Co.IA Creameries & owner:
....Alpha...Alpha Farmer's Creamery.Co.
....Alpha... Ace Webster of Waucoma.
....Bethel...E.F. Beebe of Alpha.
....Bethel... Ace Webster of Wacoma.
....Brush Creek...Brush Creek Creamery.Co (Arlington after 1895)
....Clermont...B.L. Weeks.
....Elgin...Chas. Anderson.
....Elgin... G.O. Weeks.
....Fayette...Geo. Whitley, Pres; John W. Winston, Sec.
....Hawkeye...Brown & Rogers.
....Illyria...Illyria Creamery.
....Maynard...G.H. Lattimer, Sec from Westgate.
....Maynard...Crown Creamery Co. J.C. Lewis, Sec.
....Maynard...Harlan Creamery Co., A.F. Crawford, Sec.
....Oelwein...Jamison Bros.
....Oelwein...Jefferson Creamery Co.
....Oelwein...McDonald & Edwards.
....Oelwein...Oelwein Farmer's Creamery Co.
....Randalia...Randalia Creamery Co.
....Randalia area...Fairview Creamery Co.
....Randalia...Gurnsey Smith.
....Stanley...S.C. Irvines, Manager.
....Wadena...James Leahy.
....Waucoma...Waucoma Farmer's Creamery Co.
....Waucoma...D.P. Moody.
....Waucoma...Ace Webster.
....Westgate...Corbley's Grove Creamery, G.H. Latimer.
....Westgate...Westgate Creamery Co.
....West.Union...Union Creamery Co.
....West.Union...P.L. Rowland & son.
....West.Union...Illyria Creamery Co.

...1890May23, Fayette.IA paper:  An additional separator has been added to the Creamery in Fayette, making three in all.  This looks very much like an increase in business.  Who said a creamery in Fayette, following the Ellis affair, could not be made to pay.

...Note:  The use of the DeLaval farm size cream separator (invented 1878/Sweden, patented 1887, with a plant in America) would become more and more common starting in the 1890's, along with the expanded use of commercial creamery separtors. 
....Separtors eliminated the need to let whole milk 'sit' to let the cream settle out at the top, therefore improving quality by speeding up cream production to use in churning butter.

...1890Jul25, West.Union.IA paper:  Advertisement; Ice For Sale, 150 to 200 tons of ice, at the Ellis Ice House in Fayette, which I will sell at a bargain gain to the party who will take it in bulk.  If not disposed of at once the same will be sold in small lots.  J.C. Clark, Fayette.IA.

...1890Aug08, Fayette.IA paper:  (Demise of the 1st Fayette village creamery, which was at the spring/building location of the old brewery, bz/2010)  If any one never saw a damp, dismal, mouldy ruin, a forlorn wreck of what was once a flourishing business, he needs only to visit the old Crown Creamery. It is lamentable that what was once such a fine property has so utterly gone to the dogs.  Mould and rust prevail everywhere.  It is a great pity that no available use can be made of the property with such a fine spring bubbling up within the foundation walls.

...1890Nov21, Fayette.IA paper:  It is said about town that Aaron Brown (160a farm, 2mi SW of Fayette) has withdrawn from the presidency of the Fayette Creamery Association and transferred his sympathy and milk to one of the creameries at Maynard.  Mr. Brown like to have his own way, right or wrong, about as well as any man we ever knew.

...1890Nov28, West.Union.IA paper:  Tax due/sales;  David Ellis Creamery in Smitfield.Twp, 1a, NE corner of SE1/4 of SE1/4, Sec20 (on a southern creek branch of the Volga River, 3/4mi from Seaton P.O., 6mi directly south of Fayette village).
...1890Nov28, West.Union.IA paper:  Tax due/sales (land description copied as stated); David Ellis Creamery (Ellis & Co) in Fayette, commencing at a point in Co rd 5 chs 25 lks south, 4 1/2 deg east & 4ch south, 59 1/2 deg east from the NW corner of NE1/4 of SE1/4, in Sec 20, then south 59 1/2deg east along rd 33 rds, south 30 1/2 deg west 18 rds north 59 1/2 deg west 33 rds north 59 1/2 deg east 18 rds to beginning in Sec 20, Westfield.Twp.
NOTE:  The location of the first creamery, the David Ellis Co. Crown Creamery, in Fayette village was at the head of the spring, what was called 'Canada' by the locals, 5/8 mile NW of the corner of Main/Water St's in Fayette.  This location initially was a brewery at the spring.  The Elllis Co, bought the Sherman Hotel on the SE corner of Main/Water to utilize as an office, sales headquarters, living quarters and rent out to businesses, such as a dentist's office. bz/2010

...1891Jan09, Fayette.IA paper:  The Fayette Creamery Association elected officers.  George Whitely is now pres.  Directors; Finley Smith, Harrison Gray, Tim Killerlane.  George Wilber has resigned as buttermaker as of March.  So that it will be pretty near a new deal all around.  The Company now has only $345 of indebtedness and at the close of the three years, which they are under contract to run, the institution will be free of all incumbance.

...1891Feb13, Fayette.IA paper:  About 30 farmers of the Fayette vicinity organized an Alliance here last Sat.  Charley Massey, of Fairview Creamery the past season, is to be the butter maker at the Farmers' Creamery here (Fayette), his season.

...1891Aug07, West.Union.IA paper; Fayette news; Thomas B. Peterman has bought the property of Mr. Ellis, on the SE corner of Main/Water St's.

...1892Jan08, Fayette.IA paper:  The election of officers in the Creamery Association resulted in the election of the old offices, except for one director and J.L. Pain as secretary.

…1892Jan29, West.Union.IA paper:  District Court; Marvin vs Fayette Creamery Ass’n. 

...1892Mar18, Fayette.IA paper:  Charley Massey has gone (from the Fayette Farmer's Creamery) to Cresco to operate the Farmer's Creamery, just a little east of Cresco..  It is a pleasantly located institution and we predict he will enjoy the situation.  We hope and predict that he will satisfy his employers if they are reasonable men.

...1892Apr08, Fayette.IA paper:  To the Patrons of the Fayette Creamery Association; The question has been asked frequently, "Why has the Fayette Creamery made so small payments of late."  It becomes those in charge to state a few facts.
....The January returns showed a yield of 4.05lbs of butter to 100lbs of milk.
....On this yield we paid 94c net.
....The nearest creamery reported 4.78lbs/100lbs.
....Had our yield been the same we could have paid $1.14 net, rather than the 94c.
....In Feb., we procured a Bishop Testing Apparatus, and commenced testing the milk.
....The aggregate yield began at once to improve not-withstanding the increase of fresh cows at this season of the year.
....The yield for the month of Feb, reached only 3.85lbs/100lbs, and we paid out patrons 86c net.
....During March we used the tester to its full capacity and shall pay by the test for that month.
....The natural yeield of butter usually lessens from Feb to Mar, but we had a 1/2lb/100lbs increase, reaching 4.35lbs/100lbs for March.
....Had we had that extra half pound in Feb, we could have paid 98c, rather than 94c.
....If this increase in yield has been caused by testing of the milk, then it has brought a gain to the association of $155 for march along.
....We are doing the best we can for the patrons of the creamery and think we have struck a good trail.
....J.L. Paine, Sec.

…1892Dec09, West.Union.IA paper:  Fayette Co. Farmer Ass’n Meeting; F.C. Billings, the butter maker of the Fayette Creamery, gave a public exhibition of testing milk by the Babcock test.  The necessary explanations were made by Pres. J. L. Paine and others, and much of the supposed mystery connected with the subject was removed.

...1892Dec-1983Jan...High grade butter was selling from 28-32 cents in stores, 3rd grade oleo for 15 cents & 1st grade oleo for 21 cents.

...1894Dec13, Fayette.IA paper:  We hear considerable about a deficiency in receipts for butter shipped by the Fayette Creamery Association--a matter which will probably have a hearing at the next annual meeting for the election of officers.

…1895Feb13, West.Union.IA paper:  Real Estate Transfers; Finley Smith to Fayette Creamery Ass’n, lots in Fayette, for $2500.

…1895Mar06, West.Union.IA paper:  There are 19 co-op Creameries in Fayette County, to include:  St.Lucas Farmer’s Co-op, Red Clover Co-op Creamery at Sumner, Fairview Co-op Co between Fayette/Sumner, Alpha Farmer’s Creamery, Richfield Co-op Creamery west of Alpha, Clermont Valley Creamery Co, Randalia Creamery Co, Eldorado Co-op Butter and Cheese Co, Burr Oak Creamery Co at Dover Mills, Waucoma Creamery Co, Brush Creek (Arlington) Farmer’s Creamery Co, Fayette Creamery Co, Westgate Creamery Co, Little Valley Creamery Co at Minkler (Westgate), Oelwein Farmer’s Creamery Co, Jefferson Creamery Co near Oelwein, Harlan Creamery Co at Maynard, Elgin Farmer’s Dairy Co, West Union Farmer’s Dairy Co.

...1895Mar07, Fayette.IA paper:  We notice by an item in the Industrial Gazette that J.M. Edmunds is now secretary of the Fayette Creamery Association.  We thought it would be curious if incompetency should be any longer tolerated in that office.

…1895Mar20, West.Union.IA paper:  Lima news; Mart Cullins will haul the milk to the Fayette Creamery this summer.

…1896Jan08, West.Union.IA paper:  Fayette news; A meeting of the Fayette Creamery Ass’n held Sat. afternoon was largely attended and the following officers were elected:  C.T. Yates, Pres. & director; Finley Smith, V.P.  Directors G.W. Bates of Smithfield.Twp, Ed McCue of West.Union, Tim Killerlane of Westfield.Twp, A.N. Goodrich of Fayette, M.H. Fussel as treasure, J.M. Edmunds as secretary.  The Creamery Ass;n has held a very successful and harmonious year.  The gross receipts were about $30,000, for processing 3,509,260 lbs of milk.

...1896Oct22, Fayette.IA paper:  Scobey & Duncan (grocery/general store on SW corner Main/State, today's bank corner) paid to the Fayette Creamery Association over $100 yesterday morning on the sales of creamery butter the past month.  If other grocers do a like business, the home consumption of creamery butter would run up to over $400 monthly, or nearly $5,000 a year.  But that 'if' may interfere with the statistics.

 

 

...1897Jan07, Fayette.IA paper:  Fayette Creamery Association officers elected:  C.T. Yates, Pres; A.N. Groodrich, V.P.; M.H. Fussell, Treasurery; J.M. Edmunds, Secretary.  Other directors:  Tim Killerlain, G.A. Bates, Ed. McCure.

…1897Jan20, West.Union.IA paper:  Fayette news; J.M. Spur has resigned his position as buttermaker in the Fayette Creamery, and will try farming for a change.  C.H. Wilson has been engaged to take his place in the creamery.

...1898Jan13, Fayette.IA paper:  Fayette Creamery Association officers elected:  E.C. Fussell, Pres; J.L. Paine, V.P.; M.H. Fussell, Treas; J.M. Edmunds, Sec.  Other directors:  Tim. Killerlane, E.J. McCure, John Gray.

...1899Feb02, Fayette.IA paper:  Fayette Creamery Association officers elected:  E.C. Fussell, Pres; J.L. Paine V.P.; J.L. Paine, Treas; Martin Fussel, Sec.  Other directors:  W.R. Potwin, F.L. Baker, Ed McCue.   I.L.Moss of Cascade will succeed Chas. Wilson as butter-maker.

...1899Feb22, West.Union.IA paper:  The new Fayette buttermaker, J.L. Moss, will occupy the Stevenson house, down near the creamery.

…1899Mar15, West.Union.IA paper:  Ranalia news; Our putter maker is doing double duty at present as the Fayette Creamer is undergoing repairs and nearly all of the Fayette mild is being brought to Randalia.

…1899Mar22, West.Union.IA paper:  Fayette news; The Fayette Creamery has been having quite a time getting their machinery in running order.  After everything was adjusted the engine that had been sent away for repairs refused to do its work when returned to its old place, but it was induced Sat. to change its mind and stop its pounding.   Everything has been moving satisfactory since.

...1899Apr05, West.Union.IA paper:  Fayette news;  Buttermaker Moss will move into the house vacated by Mrs. E.I. Mills, who has moved to Independence.

...1899Sept13, West.Union.IA paper:  Buttermaker Moss will move into the Dempster house (on King.St).

...1900Jan18, Fayette.IA paper:   Creamery Officials; A rather animated session of the stockholders of the Fayette Creamery Association was held in Smith's Hall (2nd floor of Smith's Grocery, NW corner of Main/State) on Sat, when the officers for 1900 were elected.  In the heat of controversy one man attempted to strike another, but was prevented, and no damage was done except to the feelings of parties concerned.  Officers elected:  C.T. Yates, Pres; Adam Shaffer, V.P.; Will (Walter Eugene) Hunt, Sec; C.R. Carpenter, Treasurer.  Directors:  E. McCure, Fred Baker, E.L. Upton.  J.M. Edmunds has been secretary for a number of years.

...1900Aug29, West.Union.IA paper:  I.L. Moss, the Fayette buttermaker, has resigned his position in the creamery and expects to leave Fayette in Oct, to take charge of a hotel in Urbana.IL.

...1900Sep20, Fayette.IA paper:  Peter Jubb will act as Sec. of the Fayette Creamery Association.

...1900Dec05, West.Union.IA paper:  Elgin will have the first rural mail route in Fayette.Co.IA.  From postoffice > Lutra> SW to Dickinson corners> SW to Gilson Creamery corner> N to Humphrey farm> SE to Hugh McKellar farm> No to Halstenson farm> SW to Weiman farm> W to Elgin; 29.25miles, from 9:30am>4:30pm, Mon>Sat.  John Falb of Elgin has the contract for $500/yr, with Will Bakerman as assistant.

...1902Jan16, Fayette.IA paper:  Fayette Creamery Association offices elected:  Adam Shaffer, Pres; P.E. Jubb, Sec; C.R. Carpenter, Tres.  Only one change was made in the board of directors, T.R. Parker taking the place of Will Jubb.

…1903Jan02, West.Union.IA paper:  Fayette news; So many farmers are getting cream separators and shipping their cream to McGregor and other places that it seems something of a question whether our Fayette Creamery will be a able to run another season.  It would be too bad to have it close.
.....Note:  The DeLaval farm size separator started to become more widely purchased during the 1890's.  In the early 1900's nearly every farm/dairy operation would own/utilize the DeLaval.

…1903Jan15, West.Union.IA paper:  Fayette news;  At a meeting of the Fayette Creamery Ass;n held Sat, the newly elected board of directors, consisting of T. Killerlain, Walter Eugene Hunt, C. Yates, M. Fussel, were instructed to issue the plant to some private individual.  There are two or three parties wishing to lease it, but no decision has yet been made.

...1903Jan22, Fayette.IA paper:  Beyer leases creamery:  At the Sat meeting of the board of directors of the Fayette Creamery Association, the creamery was leased to H.F. Beyer, of Edgewood, for one year with a three year privilege if satisfaction is given to the patrons.  The rent price for the first year is $210.  The Association is to keep the building in repair, and the lessee is bound to keep the machinery in repair except for ordinary wear and tear.  Mr. Beyer takes possession Feb 2.  He is considered financially sound, as Mr. Beyer has five other creameries under his control, owns a store in Edgewood and has considerable other property in the way of real estate.  Under the new management the creamer will receive milk and separator cream, and will pay as much for good, sweet cream as is paid at McGregor, we are informed.  The patrons hope for an increase in business from now on.

…1903Nov25, West.Union.IA paper:  Fayette news; The Fayette Creamery has a new churn, a large one.

1904Jan14, Fayette.IA paper:  The Fayette Creamery Association held its annual meeting in the hall over the House Restaurant.  The attendance was not large.  Last years officers were re-elected:  Martin Fussell, Pres; A.N. Goodrich, V.P.; C.R. Carpenter, Treas; P.E. Jubb, Sec.  Directors:  C.T. Yates, T. Killerlain, Reuben Wrench Hunt.
.....It was decided to amend section 2 of the by laws, thereby changing the date of the annual meeting from Jan. to the 2nd Sat in Dec, due to the greater convenience of an earlier date. The creamery was leased on Jan 1, to H.F. Beyer for another year by the board of directors, when they would have preferred the action of the whole association membership. 
.....Creamery Report:
...Balance...$624.50.
...Received in 1903 for sale of butter, etc....$1052.11.
.....Total..$1656.70.
...Pd for milk...$1145.49.
...Pd for hauling milk...$82.80.
...Pd forfeit ret'd tohaulers...$99.91.
...Pd for taxes...$14.63.
...Pd for insurance...$50.25.
...Pd for supplies...$37.80.
...Pd for freight and drayage...$10.35.
...Pd for repairs (separator)...$29.11.
...Pd for repairs (creamery)...$118.29.
...Pd for sundries...$11.57.
...Buttermaker Jan. salary...$47.20.
...Sec postage & Jan salary...$10.82.
...Treas Jan Salary...$2.00.
...Balance on hand $16.78.
.....Total...$1676.70.
...Amt due patrons on old pay rolls...$26.11.
...Deducting balance on hand...$16.78.
...Have overdrawn...$9.33.

...1904Dec15, Fayette.IA paper:  The Fayette Creamery Association held its annual meeting Sat.  Attendance was light.  Last year's officers were re-elected & discussion of conditions indulged in.  It is uncertain what disposition will be made of the plant for next year (1905).  Mr. Beyer's lease is up in Feb.  The opinion of the directors is that Beyer be given a renewal for 1905.  Some stockholders favor selling plant or running it co-operatively as was formerly done (before 1903).  Mr. Beyer probably will continue to run the creamery, for if the Association were to undertake its operation again, it would haove to buy the churn and separator that Beyer put in, or new ones to take their place.  The annual rent income to Beyer is now $225.

...1905Nov30, Fayette.IA paper:  The annual meeting of the Fayette Creamery Association will be 1pm, 1905Dec09 in the Hoyt & Davis Building on the east side of Main.St.  A full turn out of stockholders and patrons is requested to decide what is best to be done with the Creamery.

...1905Dec14, Fayette.IA paper:  The Fayette Creamery Association is to take full charge of the Creamery again.   The lease plan was not satisfactory.  To a man the stockholders and patrons voted to operate it themselves.  H.F. Beyer's 3yr lease expires 1906Feb01, at which time the directors expect to have arrangemens completed ton continue operation as an association.  There was a very pronounced expression to the effect that the big creamery 'trust' is gobbling up small creameries and when all have been put out of business the 'trust' will regulate prices for cream to suit itself.  Not selling out received a hearty 'amen' from all over the room.  The renting/leasing proposition was also dismisssed.  Officers elected:  Pres. m.H. Fussel,  VP A.N. Goodrich, Sec. P.E. Jubb, Treasurer C.R. Carpenter.  Directors:  A.N. Gooderich, Adam Shafer, E.L. Upton, C.T. Yates.

...1906Dec13, Fayette.IA paper:  The Fayette Creamery Association wishes all  to know that as high a price will be paid for butter fat, considering the time of the month, as can be obtained elsewhere.  Officers elected:  Pres. Adam Shafer, Sec. P.E.Jubb, Treasurer C.R. Carpenter.  Directors:  T.Killerlain, Fred Ashby, L.D. Shafer. E.L. Upton.

 …1906Dec26, West.Union.IA paper:  G.M. Miller has been selected buttermaker at the Fayette Creamery.

...1907Dec19, Fayette.IA paper:  Te Fayette Creamery Association reported the creamery is in the best  condition it has been for years, everything paid up and money enough on hand to pay for putting up the ice for the coming year.
.....Milk received, 302,563 lb; average milk test 3.7.
.....Cream received, 302,820 lb; average cream test 28.1.
.....Butter sold to NY & Boston, 101,133 lb.
.....Butter sold to stores, 9,273 lb.
.....Butter sold to patrons, 5,426 lb.
.....Average price for butterfat, 27+ cents/lb.
.....Total received for butter, coal & cream during 1907, $30,418.80.

 ...1907:  From directory of Fayette.Co.IA Creameries; Fayette Creamery Association, Peter E. Jubb, Sec & Wm. Dubbs, buttermaker, a Co-operative creamery.

…1907Apr24, West.Union.IA paper:  Fayette.Co Board of Supervisor’s business; Petition for bridges across the Volga River in Sec 32, T93N, R8W, and one near the Fayette Creamery was referred to committee.

…1907Apr26, West.Union.IA paper:  Fayette news;  Petition for bridges across the Volga River in Sec 32, T93N, R8W, and one near the Fayette Creamery (would become known at the 'Creamery Bridge) have been referred to committee of the whole board.

...1907Aug29...Fayette.IA paper:  New Bridge near the Creamery; (at the east end of Water.St) Iron arrived last week and the bridge gang began it work Monday.  Much to the joy of people who live down the Volga river, on the other side, as well as many others who have business which takes them across the stream frequently there will soon be a bridge over the Volga, just east of the creamery.  The materials arrived Sat., and on Mon., the bridge gang came and went to work at once, getting the stuff on the ground.
....The bridge is the result of a heavily signed petition to the county supervisors some time ago, which was circulated by Chas. Elliott and Grant Dean, who have known for some time that the bridge would be built.  M.L. Thomas of Des Moines who is here with his wife, is foreman of the construction crew.
.....The "Creamery Bridge" is to be 135ft long, and will be 12ft above the present water level, thus insuring safety in times of freshets (high water).  The iron work is to rest on steel casing filled with concrete, and these will be substantially set on the solid rock in the river bed.  The approaches will make an easy connection between the road and the bridge.
....The bridge has long been wanted, and will be a great convenience at some seasons of the year have been practically cut off from all communication with the town of Fayette.

...1907Oct10...Fayette.IA paper:  The iron work on the new bridge near the creamery was all in position Sat. night except the guard railings, and is a suspension bridge high up in the air and 135ft in length.  It "holds its own," the temporary substructure having been put out of use.  They who reside down stream are well pleased with the improvement as well as some who live in town and own land over the river.  (Note:  Before this bridge, a river ford on the upstream side of the bridge was the normal river crossing.)

...1907Oct17...Fayette.IA paper:  The new "Creamery Bridge" is all in, or all up and ready for the work of constructing the approaches, which should be done before bad weather sets in and frozen ground delays operations.

…1907Dec11, West.Union.IA paper:  Fayette news;  The Fayette Creamery Ass’n will hold its annual meeting Sat. afternoon, Dec 14, at 1pm, in the Hoyt & David building on Main.St, for the election of officers.

...1907...Creameries in Fayette.Co.IA.

Office Record No.

Creamery Name

Name of Proprietor, Secretary or Manager

P.O Address of Proprietor,
Secretary or Manager

Name of Buttermaker

Type of Creamery

252 Brush Creek Farmers' Creamery Co. Guy L. Rawson Arlington L.S. Edwards Stock
253 Clermont Valley Creamery Co. F.F. Ferguson Clermont A. Erickson Co-operative
254 Elgin Farmers Dairy Co. M. Luchsinger Elgin Ed Hanson Co-operative
255 Fayette Creamery Association Peter E. Jubb Fayette Wm. Dubbs Co-operative
256 Hawkeye Creamery Co. (Hawkeye) J.Q. Adams West Union Chris Russler Co-operative
257 Harlan Creamery Co. J.C. Lewis Maynard C.B. Bracey Co-operative
258 Oran Creamery Co. (Oran) F.T. Shelton Fairbank Chas. Marks Stock
259 Oelwein Farmers Creamery Co. J.R. Ross Oelwein C.M. Ross Co-operative
260 Jefferson Creamery (Oelwein) H.H. Meyer Maynard A.H. Ford Co-operative
261 Randalia Creamery Co. J.E. Holmes Randalia Robt. Wagner Co-operative
262 Center Valley Creamery A.E. Fridley Sumner Wm. Wenthe Stock
263 Farmers Co-op Creamery Co. John J. Mihm St. Lucas B.H. Kuennen Co-operative
264 Westgate Co-op Creamery Co. F.S. Coleman Westgate C.H. Capper Co-operative
265 Riverside Creamery F.J. Schroeder Wadena F.J. Schroeder Individual
266 West Union Creamery Co. N.H. Nelson Calmar Chas. Horton Individual
267 Waucoma Farmers Creamery Co. Elmer Farr Waucoma P.J. Kolbet Co-operative
268 Farmers Mutual Co-op Creamery Co. F.A. Sherman Stanley Frank Strong Co-operative
269 Alpha Farmers Creamery J.T. Gager Alpha C.N. Beach Co-operative
270 Richfield Creamery Co. (Sumner) H.C. Schroeder Hawkeye C.A. Day Co-operative
271 Maple Grove Creamery Co. (Oelwein) T.E. Sadler Hazleton T.E. Sadler Co-operative

…1908Jan28, West.Union.IA paper:  Fayette news:  H.F. Beyer, of Edgewood has rented the Fayette Creamery for a year with a privilege of three years if the patrons are satisfied.  Mr. Beyer for several years has successfully operated a number of creameries in Delaware and Clayton counties.  He takes possession Feb 2.
.....Note:  Beyer rented/leased/ran the creamery 1903, 1904, 1905.  The Fayette Creamery Association ran it 1906, 1907.

...1908Apr30, Fayette.IA paper:  A relic of the past was found back of the Swartley store, in the form of a stencil plate bearing the name of David Ellis, Boston.  It has evidently been vibrating around Fayette ever since the days of the Ellis Creamery 20 or more years ago.

...1908May14, Fayette.IA paper:  Strawberry Point is to have a new creamery erected by the Farmers' Creamery Association.

...1908July16, Fayette.IA paper:  The Fayette Creamery Association has stopped buying cream at the station up town, because some of the cream received was too old.  Cream ought to be delivered every second day or three times a week, so as to make good butter.  Anyone  wishing to bring their cream to the creamery (on east Water.St), we will do our best to receive it.  The creamery patrons have been receiving 2 to 3 cents more for your butter fat per lb. than the price of butter for NY Extras has been.  To continue to do this you have to furnish good clean & sweet cream.  It is in your interest and will get a higher price for your cream.  Please see that your separators and cans are washed and scalded out every day and that the cream is kept in a cool place. 

...State Dairy Commissioner instructions for creamery managers, purchasing agents, mild producers: 
....The production of good milk and cream is a comparatively easy matter requiring only cleanliness, low temperatures and frequent delivery.
....Hand separators should be washed/scalded immediately after each time used.
....Fresh cream must be cooled before mixing with cold cream, and held in cold water summer & winter.
....Milk/cream cans must washed/scalded.
....Deliver only clean/wholesome cream at least every 2nd day in summer, 3rd day in winter.

...1908Jul23...Fayette.IA paper:   Flooding; It was some old timers belief that the flood of 1902May, was high enough to match anything before or since, yet the recent one was plenty high enough.  It rained 5.5" between 7pm & 4am.  The north end of the new Creamery Bridge, near the creamery was partially washed out, enough to prevent crossing with a team.  It prevented getting several cows to a pasture on the north side of the river, and some were roped and their owners holding one end of the rope while the 'come boss' was grazing on the roadside. 
.....The bridge over the old millrace in Westfield  (Klocks Island area) was carried away, and some damage was done up the railroad track so that the north bound passenger train did not get a clearance card till about 1pm.  some stock was drowned and floated down river.  The rain was so fierce that it penetrated some of the old roofs in town.

…1908Dec23, West.Union.IA paper:  Fayette news; At the annual meeting, Dec 12, of the Fayette Creamery Ass’n, the officers who served during the past year were re-elected as follows:  Adam Shafer as Pres, E.L. Upton as V.P, P.E. Jabb as secretary, C.R. Carpenter as treasurer; directors Fred Ashby, Mark Hubbell and Tim Killerlain.  Mr. Carpenter made a very gratifying report, saying they had made an increase of more than 50% over the year 1907, and more than 100% over 1906.  The association has added a new churn, a cream vat, and a new refrigerator the past year.

...1909...West.Union.IA paper:  Charles Homes served as buttermaker at Fayette and Littleport, 1908-1909.  In 1910, he accepted a position as buttermaker at Monticello.

...1909Jun23, West.Union.IA paper:  Fayette news; Tues. morning of last week while G.M. Miller, Buttermaker at the Fayette Creamery, was trying to throw one of th levers to change the speed of the churn, his hand slipped and went into the cogs, and the fingers and thumb were lacerated.  Drs. Baker (father/son) found it necessary to amputate the first and second fingers at the hand and the thumb between first and second joint.  He is fortunate in one way, for he has accident insurance.   Martin Cronk and William Earl are working at the creamery while he is laid up.

...1909Dec09, Fayette.IA paper:  Must Build New Creamery, Annual Metting, Dec 11; W.B. Johnson, Ass't State Dairy Commissioner, will address the necessity of building a new creamery.  He has stated a new new building would be a necessity if the association wished to continue business, due to the condition of the present building which is not regarded as sanitary as it should be.  A year is the set time for which a new building should be erected.  The present building is an old one, of wooden construction, and is commending to decay in places, being difficult to keep in a good condition as State Officials think necessary.  If a new one is built it will doubtless be of brick, now commonly used in replacing old creameries.  There is a need for full turnout of stockholders and patrons. 

…1909Dec15, West.Union.IA paper:  Fayette news, Dec 13; The annual meeting of the Fayette Creamery association was held Sat. afternoon, Dec 11.  Officers elected were; Adam Shafer as Pres, Mark Hubbell as V.P., Peter Jubb as secretary, C.R. Carpenter as treasurer.   The matter of building a new creamery came up.  The condition of the present building is such that a new one will be a necessity before long but they decided not to build one at present.

...1910Jan05, Fayette.IA paper:  Fayette Creamery Association patron having the largest number of pounds of butter fat during the year ending 1909Nov15;
.....J.Yearous 2465, D.Gage 2453, M.Fussell 2444, L.Greenough 2444, Fred Baker 2411, O.W.Tatro 2355, H.Heeten 2343, W.B. Stevenson 2343, Blutn & Schlee 2315, F.Adams 2231, J.M. Leizher 2231, Payne Mill 2206, F.J.Ressler 2193, Heelmer & Son 2191, G.Metcalf 2190, Thomas Potter 2197, Edwin Masters 2100, F.H.Kiel 1908, O.Holtzman 1908, A.M.Michol 1908, F.Pattison 1921, W.Trudo 1776, Thomas Wilson 1746, a.J. Koehler 1747, J.Hastings 1746, N.F.Henry 1731, E.Collett 1716, Logan Wilson 1652, C.Welsh 1609, O.W. Stevenson 1609, E.Lockwood 1590, W.Chase 1679, C.Oelberg 1564, D.Sweet 1556, Joseph Havenstrite 1538, H.Hettler 1532, Walter Eugene Hunt 1462 (1/2mi S of Grandview Cem), Valentine Strayer 1457 (1/2mi S of Eagle Point) (BZ's Hunt & Strayer g/grandfathers mother side)  Adam Shafer 1457, Ed Thomas 1449, C.Langerman 1480, Orange Paul 1427, A.K.Baldwin 1407, A.N. Goodrich 1428, W.E.Oderkirk 1428.

…1910Dec07, West.Union.IA paper:  The annual meeting of the Fayette Creamery Association is to be held Sat. afternoon, Dec10, in the Wm. Heiserman building for the election of officers. 
…1910Dec14, West.Union.IA paper:  The annual meeting of the Fayette Creamery association was held Sat, Dec10.  The following offices were re-elected:  Adm Shafer as Pres, Mark Hubbell as V.P., Peter Jubb as secretary, C.R. Carpenter as treasurer.  Directors:  T.Killerlain, Mark Hubbell, E.L. Upton and Adam Shafer, Fred Baker will take the place of Fred Ashby.

…1910Dec21, West.Union.IA paper:  Fayette news; The report of the Fayette creamery association for 1910:
…..Lb’s of milk received…346,881.
…..Lb’s of cream…605,892.
…..Lb’s of butter fat…176,639.
…..Lb’s butter made…209.365.
…..Received for butter & cream…$61,678.96.
…..Cash paid to patrons…$50,382.53.
…..Paid to patrons in butter…$3,621.19.
…..Handling paid by patrons…$1,158.10.
…..Coal, salt, oil paid by patrons…$362. 93.
…….Total…$56,924.75.
…The Fayette Creamery business shows an increase in 1910 of nearly 20% over 1909.

...1912Dec05, Fayette.IA paper:  The Fayette Creamery Association will meet at 1pm, Dec14, in the Wm. Heiserman building on the east side of Main.St for the electiona of officers and business transactions.  A full turnout of stockholders and patrons are requested to best decide what to do with the buttermilk.

...1912Dec19, Fayette.IA paper:  Report for Creamery for 1912.   Elected: Pres. Adam Shafer, Sec. Peter E. Jubb, the two Banks will pay off for the creamery every other pay day.  Directors:  Fred Baker, Valentine E. Strayer, Tim Killerlain, J.H. Hubbel.
....Milk received 465,352lb; cream received 659,812lb; lbs of milk Butter Fat 16,971.9; lbs of Cream Butter Fat 174,642.2; total Butter Fat 191,614.1 lb; lbs Butter sold in NY 197,195; lbs Butter sold to Patrons 16,305; lbs Butter sold to stores 16,336; total lbs Butter sold 229836; ave Milk Test 3.65; ave Cream Test 26.4; ave over run 20.3; received for Butter $67,805.08; received for Milk & Cream $228.33; total received $68,033.41; cash paid to Patrons $55,524.01; butter to Patrons $4,940.74; ave price/lb received for butter 29.5 cents; ave price paid for butterfat $32.45/100lb.

...1912Dec26, Fayette.IA paper:  The Creamery directors on Sat2012Dec28, will receive bids for hauling cream and hire cream haulers, at the State Bank.

…1914Jan14, West.Union.IA paper:  G.M. Mercer goes Feb 1, to Randalia to take change of their creamery. Martin Cronk has charge of the Fayette Creamery.


Fayette County Leads Iowa in Dairying:
...1914Sep02, West.Union.IA paper:  Fayette County is the leading diary county in Iowa.
....Leads Iowa in Dairying...Fayette Country produces $1,500,000 of Dairy Products each year, best of the 99 Iowa Counties..so says State Dairy Commissioner W.B. Barney.  The Cow Test Associations say, bifth in number of cows, far above average in butter production, has 21 creameries.
....Fayette county is ranked third behind Polk and Woodbury, but they have large centralized creamery plants in Des Moines and Sioux City, and both behind Fayette as original producers of dairy products.
...Dairy farming has been the main reliance of Fayette county farmers.
...With 21 creameries, nearly every farmer is within reach.
...The dairy industry is of great monetary value to the county, and diary regions contain more livestock production than other forms of farming.
...The farm soil also becomes increasingly rich owing to the large number of livestock kept.
...Fayette.Co has 43,123 diary cows, 5th in Iowa.
...Dairying tends to produce a habit of thrift with a constant and certain stream of income in small amounts, rather than the large ups and downs of ventures in grain or live stock.
...Dairying consistently also spins of to banks, banking and local businesses.
...Fayette.Co has an unequalled water supply.  There are hundreds of farmers with a never failing stream of clear waster, or have good wells.
...Water flowing from springs among lime rocks produces a firmness in the butter product found in few parts of the U.S.
...Holstein-Friesian cattle breeders have formed, like the cow-test associations, encouraging all dairy herd owners to keep records on every cow, only keeping cows that show profit each year.
...Annual yield of butter per cow:  Fayette.Co = 156 lb/year, Iowa 123 lb/year.
...Iowa buttermaker scoring in 1913:  1st with 97 was T.E. Sadler of Oelwein, 4th E.E. Mittlestadt of Arlington, 6th Anton Smith of Oelwein.
Fayette.Co 1913:  Had 21 creameries (20 were cooperatives), serving 3,064 patrons.
...40,602,557 lbs whole milk received.
....7,038,993 lbs.cream received.
....3,905,568 lbs butter manufactured in year ending 1913Jun30.
....3,443,469 lbs butter shipped to eastern markets.
.......264,555 lbs butter bought by patrons.
.......197,544 lbs butter sold in Iowa.
....21 creameries received milk & cream from 24,878 cows.
.....Ave. butter yield 156.9 lbs per cow.
....From 518 Iowa creameries, ave. yield 123 lbs per cow.
....W.B. Barney, State Diary Commissioner state by letter:  Fayette County is without question the best butter producing county in Iowa.
......Fayette.Co ranks 5th in cows over one year old:  1st Pottawattamie 49,401, 2nd Clinton 47,209, 3rd Plymouth 44,569, 4th Crawford 43,130, 5th Fayette 43,123.

       
Creameries in Fayette.Co.IA, 1913-1914 Location Secretary Buttermaker
Oran Creamery Co Oran J.N. Getz B.F. Bently
German Creamery Co. Westgate Wm. Seagers L. C. Barnes
Maple Grove Creamery Co. 4mi SE of Oelwein Thomas Sadler Thomas Sadler
Alpha Farmers' Creamery Co. Alpha J.T. Gager J.F. Cummings
Richfield Creamery Co. 7mi NE of Sumner F.F. Wittenburg C.A. Day
Farmers' Mutual Co-Op Creamery Ass'c. Stanley George Jellings D.T. Broers
Waucoma Farmers' Co-Op Creamery Waucoma Thomas McEnaney W.H. Eischeid
Riverside Creamery Co. Wadena F.J. Schroeder F.J. Schroeder
Westgate Co-Op Creamery Co. Westgate F.S. Coleman E.H. Homan
Farmers' Co-Op Creamery St. Lucas G.H. Hackman Ben H. Kuennen
Center Valley Creamery Co. Randalia J.S. Briggs F.M. Zell
Jefferson Creamery Co. 4mi NW of Oelwein H.H. Meyer Anton Smith
Harlan Farmers' Mutual Co-Op Creamery Maynard J.C. Lewis C.R. Braey
Hawkeye Creamery Co. Hawkeye J.Q. Adams Chris Russler
Fayette Creamery Association Fayette Peter Jubb G.M. Miller
Elgin Farmers' Dairy Co. Elgin Melchoir Luchsinger Hans Jensen
Clermont Valley Creamery Co. Clermont F.F. Ferguson Amon Erickson
Arlington Farmers' Creamery Co. Arlington Floyd Finney E.E. Middlestadt
Oelwein Farmers' Co-Op Creamery Oelwein L.C. Harwood G.O. Miller
West Union Farmers' Creamery Co. West Union F.C. Billings B.F. Schultz
       

Return to top


...1914Dec03, Fayette.IA paper:  The Creamery Association meeting will be held in the Davis and Claxton building on the east side of Main.St, upstairs over Whipple's Store, at 1pm, Sat.Dec12.  Officers will be elected and business transacted.  A full turn out is requested.

 

…1914Dec23, West.Union.IA paper:  Fayette Creamery Report for 1914:  All officers of the preceding year were re-elected; Adam Shafer as Pres, Ed Langerman as V.P. U& director, Peter Jubb as secretary.  Directors; O.G. Fussell, Will Finch, O.W. Tatro.  The State Bank of Fayette and the First National Bank of Fayette were selected as treasurers, with check to be paid alternately for semi-monthly periods.
…..Lbs. milk received…28,660.
…..Lbs. cream received…763,842.
…..Lbs. butterfat…208,908.
…..Lbs. butterfat sold in cream…532.
…..Lbs. butterfat made into butter…208,376.
…..Lbs. butter made…252,680.
…..Lbs. butter sold in New York City…208,656.
…..Lbs. butter sold to patrons…13,616.
…..Lbs. butter sold to stores…22,047.
…..Lbs. butter carried into next year…496.
…..Lbs. butter increase from 1912…19,000,
…..Average milk test…3.5.
…..Average cream test…24.7.
…..Average overrun…21.2.
…..Rec’d for butter…$70,377.71.
…..Rec’d for cream….$205.65.
…..Total Rec’d…$70,533.36.
…..Paid Patrons…$56,714.89.
…..Patrons’ butter…$5,423.32.
…..Paid patrons by coal…$332.41.
…..Hauling paid by patrons…$1,920.68.
…..Estimated running expenses…$5,767.29.
…..Ave. price for butterfat…30.82c/lb.

...1914Dec21, Fayette.IA paper:  Bids will be taken of the Fayette Creamery Association for the purchase of buttermilk to be sold on the basis of t he amount produced from each 100lbs of butter.  Peter E. Jubb, Sec.

...1915Feb10, West.Union.IA paper:  Ralph Porter, a Fayette boy, has charge of the creamery at Randalia.  He takes G.M. Miller's place who also at one time was buttermaker at Fayette, but now is to assist Mr. Briar at Monona in the sale of monuments (after losing fingers/thumb in a churn accident at the Fayette Creamery).

…1915Mar03, West.Union.IA paper:  Will Attend National Butter Show; B.F. Schultz will leave for Mason City, where the national convention of buttermakers is to be held for three days.  Mr. Schultz and other butter makers of Fayette /County will have exhibits.  Fayette Creamery men are in the habit of winning prizes, but this time they expect to have to go against a competition including over 700 tubs of butter from as many individual makers.

…1915Dec22, West.Union.IA paper:  Fayette Creamery Report for 1915;  Officers elected were Adam Shafer as Pres & director, will finch as V.P. & director, Ed Langerman director, John Hunt director, O.G. Fussell director, Peter E. Jubb secretary.  The two banks continue as treasurers. 
…..Lbs. cream received…920,660.
…..Lbs. milk received…15,507.
…..Lbs. butter fat from cream…236,579.
…..Lbs. butter fat from milk…536.
…..Total lbs. butter fat…237,115.
…..Lbs. shipped to New York City…242,346.
…..Lbs. butter to stores…24,148.
…..Lbs. butter to patrons…19,231.
…..Total Lbs. butter made…285,875.
…..Lbs. butter increased from 1914>1915…36,757.
…..Ave. cream test…25.7.
…..Ave. milk test…3.4.
…..Ave. over run…20.7
…..Ave. price received for butter…27.3c/lb.
…..Ave. price paid for butter fat…$30.28/100lb.
…..Received for butter shipped to New York City…$65,091.14.
…..Received for butter sold to stores…$7,195.73.
…..Received for butter sold to partrons….$5,676,46. 
…..Cream sold….$80.37.
…..Buttermilk sold…$300.
…...Total received…$78,343.70.
……Increase for butter and cream… 1914>1915…$7,460.34. 
……Paid patrons cash…$64,091.43.
……Butter to patrons….$5,676.46.
……Hauling by patrons…$1920.68.
……Coal, etc….$280.
……Total…$71,978.57.

...1916Apr27, Fayette.IA paper:  Fayette creamery buys electric motor; The Fayette Creamery will have electric power in the future 10hp motor having been ordered.  The wiring was done the latter part of last week.  The motor takes the place of a steam engine and will get the 'juice' from Miller & Sons' power plant at Clermont.

...1916Jun29, Fayette.IA paper:  New Creamery; There is a rumor that a new creamery is to be erected at Randalia to replace the one which was burned last spring.

...1916Dec07, Fayette.IA paper:  The Fayette Creamery Association will meet upstairs in the Platt & Sampson building/store on the east side of Main.St at 1pm, Dec09,

...1916Dec14, Fayette.IA paper:  Gas Flavor Downs Butter;  When it is considered that in scoring butter, 45 of the 100 points are awarded for flavor, it is well that farmers know the cause and remedy of some of the common defects of butter as regards to flavor.
.....Gasoline flavor...is often traceable to the farm where the man who milks is the man who drives the car and who does not wash his hands between the time of his caring for the machine and milking the cow.  It may also come from the creamery where a gasoline engine is used and the creamery not well ventilated.
.....Cellar flavor...is a common defect of butter during the winter months, caused by keeping the cream in a poorly ventilated cellar close to vegetables or other food stuffs.  Similar flavor may be absorbed if the cream is kept in the kitchen. 
.....Barn flavor...is absorbed in the same way when the milk or cream is kept too long in the barn.
.....Old cream flavor...come from the use of over ripe (soured) cream, due ot the fact that the milk is not delivered to the creamery soon enough, or not cared for properly on the farm.
.....In order to have the cream of good quality it should be cooled immediately after it has been skimmed and before it is mixed with the cream from previous skimmings.  It is most convenient to have a water tank placed between the pump and the watering tank for stock.  All of the water pumped for stock passes thru this small tank which is covered, in which is placed the ream in tall cans.  After the cream has been cooled in this way, it may be mixed without injury.

...1917Jan11, Fayette.IA paper:  At the Fayette Commercial Club meeting, the matter of a new Creamery Organization and building was taken up and discussed for a time.  D.H.Sweet, W.N.Clothier and S.T.Funk were appointed as a special committee to interview the officers of the local Creamery Association and go over matters and report back to the club.  Sentiment seemed to be strong for a new organization and a modern creamery plant at Fayette.

...1917Jan25, Fayette.IA paper:  Creamery Officials Discuss Erection of New Building:  The Directors of the Fayette Creamery Association held a meeting last Sat., for a general discussion of the question of building a new creamery.  Along with the special committee of the Fayette Commercial Club, it was the opinion of all present that the matter of a new organization and new creamery building, be deferred to some time in the future. 

...1917Nov29, Fayette.IA paper:  The annual Fayette Creamery Association meeting will be over the Platt & Sampson building on the east side of Main.St at 1pm, on SatDec08.

...1917Dec26, West.Union.IA paper:  Fayette Leader, Fayette Creamery Report for 1917;  Officers elected, Adam Shafer Pres & director, Valentine Eugene Strayer V.P. & director, C.R. Carpenter & F.E. Finch treasurers, Peter E. Jubb secretary.  Directors; R.R. Fussell, Will Brown, and Will Finch.
.....Lbs. cream received...593,486.
.....Lbs. milk received...40,443.
.....Lbs. butterfat produced....150,839.
.....Lbs. butter sold to New York City...150,119.
.....Lbs. butter sold to stores...17,416.
.....Lbs. butter sold to patrons....12,678.
.....Lbs. butter carried over to 1918...522.
.....Total lbs. butter...180,735.
......Ave. cream test...25.7.
.....Ave. overrun...21.1.
.....Ave. price for butterfat...44.2c/lb.
.....Received for N.Y. butter....$58,914.52.
.....Received for store butter....$7,031.39.
.....Received for patrons' butter...$5,027.54.
.....Butter carried over...$224.46.
.....Received for cream....$81.39.
.....Received for buttermilk...$50.77.
.....Total received...$71,330.08.
.....Paid patrons for cream....$59,053.19.
.....Paid patrons for butter....$5,027.54.
.....Hauling by patrons...$2700.23.
.....Running expenses....$4,549.112.
.....Total paid...$71,330.08.
.....Supplies & coal on hand...$430.88.

...1918Mar21, Fayette.IA paper:  There will be a meeting at the County Agents room, 1918Mar23, 2pm, for the purpose of re-organizing the Farmer's Creamery Cooperative Ass'n by all the persons that are interested in this.

...1918May29, West.Union.IA paper:  Fayette news, May25; A meeting of the officers and directors and all persons interested in the Fayette Creamery association is called for 2pm Sat, June01, at the county agent's office (3 story, old bank/Farm Bureau building on Main.ST), for re-organization of the association.

...1918Dec18, West.Union.IA paper:  Fayette news; The regular meeting of the Fayette Creamery Association was held at the county agent's office on Sat afternoon. The old officers and directors were re-elected:  Adam Shafer Pres, P.E. Jubb secretary; directors R.R. Fussell, Valentine Eugene Strayer, W.J. Brown and Wm. Finch.

 ...1918Dec19, Fayette.IA paper:  A new Creamery is now a prospect.  The new organization will probably arrange for a new building soon.

...1919...No Fayette papers searches for

Return to top


1919

The Fayette Creamery Association was
reorganized into the Fayette Mutual Creamery Association,
a new creamery was built at the south end of King.St near the railroad yard.


 The Third Fayette Creamery, 1919>1965

The Fayette Creamery Association re-formed into the Fayette Mutual Creamery Association
 A new brick/cement creamery was put into operation at the south end of King.St, in the depot area.
The old creamery equipment was sold; the building/grounds on Water.St at the north end of Jones.St  was sold as a little farmstead.

...1919Feb01...The Fayette Creamery Company reorganized and incorporated as the Fayette Mutual Creamery Associaion in 1919.
.....The board members were Henry Hettler, Rueben Wrench Hunt, L.E. Benington, H.J. Pattison, L.A. Kiel, W.H.Tunrer,  Sec. Peter E. Jubb>
.....Buttermaker was  Charles Finch.
.....A new brick/cement creamery was built at the south end of King.St.
.....The new creamery received cream, manufactured butter and shipped butter by rail to the N.Y. market, plus sold to local stores and patrons.
.....In 1955, the Fayette creamery would again re-organize as the Fayette Cooperative Creamery Association in 1955
.....Some outstanding buttermakers at Fayette:  Charles Finch, A.H. Bentz, Doyle Nefzgar, Frank Bright, Eldon Otterstein (the most awarded and longest serving, 1949-1965).  Numerous assistant buttermakers would go on to serve as opperators of other creameries.


...1919Feb06, Fayette.IA paper:  Fayette Mutual Creamery Association:   New Creamery Company....to raise funds for a new creamery.  The directors are arranging for loans from the Fayette banks and will soon make a canvass of all patrons to see if patrons will furnish the pledges or guarantees necessary to secure funds.  The Secretary will have a schedule figured out showing how many pounds butter fat each patron has furnished the creamery during the past year, and each patron will be asked to guarantee at least his share of entire cost considering amount of butter fat he has sent to the creamery. 
....Officers of the new Fayette Mutual Creamery Association:  Henry Hettler, Pres; F.A. Kiel, V/P.; Peter Jubb, Sec.  Directors:  H.J. Pattison, James Richards, W.H. Turner, L.E. Bennington and Reuben Wrench Hunt.

...1919Apr17, Fayette.IA paper:  The directors of the Fayette Mutual Creamery Association meet 1pm, Friday, 1919Apr25, at the State Bank, to receive bids for the building of a new Creamery.  The plans, blue prints and specifications for the building will be at the office of the Farmer's Cooperative Shipping Association with Mr. Reuben Wrench Hunt.  By order of the Board of Direcors.

...1919May01, Fayette.IA paper:  Notice of Incorporation of the Fayette Mutual Creamery Association:  A corporation has been organized named the 'The Fayette Mutual Creamery Association,' with its principal place of business at Fayette, Fayette.Co.IA. 
.....The general nature of business shall be the collection of milk or cream and the manufacture of butter or other dairy products and sale upon the mutual plan. 
.....The Association has no capital stock represented by shares, but is authorized to raise a building fund by donations or assessments upon patrons. 
.....The Association commenced 1919Feb08, and continues for 20yrs (1939Feb), unless sooner dissolved by 2/3 vote of its memebers.
.....The Association affairs shall be managed by a 8 directors, including the Pres, V.P, & Sec.  The Board of Directors shall be elected by ballot at the annual meeting, to be held on the 2nd Sat of Dec. of each year.
.....The Association shall not become indebted for more than $10,000, over/above sums due patrons as dividends on current business.  Private property of members shall be exempt from corporate debts.

...1919Dec04, Fayette.IA paper:  The annual meeting of the Fayette Creamery Association and of the Fayette Mutual Creamery Association will be held in the County Agents' office at 1pm.Sat, Dec18, for election of officers and transaction of business.  A full turnout of stockholders and patrons is requested.

...1919Dec11, Fayette.IA paper:  Public Auction at the (old) Fayette Creamery (N end of Jones.St), 1920Jan03Sat; the creamery building, warehouse, lot, engine, boiler, churn, cream vat, starter can, pump, shafting, pipes and valves, cream cans and other things too numerous to mention.  Terms; cash or one year's time on approved notes.

...1919Dec25, Fayette.IA paper:  Butter sold for $120,273 last year.  Large volume of business of Fayette Creamery is evident from the Sec.'s report.  The reports of the two creamery associations, the Fayette Creamery Association and the new Fayette Mutual Creamery Association, are given together, as they are practically one.  The report is for the year ending 1919Nov15th.
....Lbs cream received...547,731.
....Lbs milk received for starter...60,010.
....Lbs butter fat...174,931.
....Lbs butter sold in New York & Chicago...179,569.
....Lbs butter sold to stores...18,232.
....Lbs butter sold to patrons...13,695.
....Lbs butter carried to next year...225.
....Lbs butter carried from last year...292.
....Total lbs butter sold...211,529.
....Ave. cream teat...27.0.
....Ave. overrun net butter...20.32.
....Ave. price paid for butter fat...$63.30/100lbs.
....Rec'd from N.Y. & Chicago butter...$102.105.57.
....Rec'd from stores...$10,299.43.
....Rec'd from patrons...$7887.23.
....Carried into next year...$150.75.
....Sub.total...$120,443.03.
....Carried from last year...$169.36.
....Total for butter...$120,273.67.
....Rec'd for cream...$761.47.
....Rec'd for buttermilk...$75.25.
....Total received...$121,100.39.
....Paid to patrons for cream & milk...$99,898.56.
....Butter to patrons...$7,787.23.
....Hauling paid by patrons....$3,168.27.
....Estimated expenses...$7,608.37.
....Into the sinking fund...$903.30.
....Supplies on hand...$407.52.

Return to top


1920's

 ...1920Apr14, West.Union.IA paper:  The Fayette Mutual Creamery association are making another improvement in their new creamery, building a shingled roof over a platform 12x22ft, so that the empty cans and the buttermilk loading will be handled under cover.

...1920Dec16, Fayette.IA paper:  The Fayette Creamery is in prosperous state; at the annual meeting it was shown that business increased $18k in 1920.
....Lbs cream received...757,729.
....Lbs milk for starter...49,124.
....Lbs cream butter fat...197,570.
....Lbs butter sold in New York & Chicago...304,573.
....Lbs butter sold to stores...18,427.
....Lbs butter sold to patrons...17,234.
....Lbs butter carred over into next year...436.
....Total lbs butter made in 1920...240,545.
....Ave cream test...26.07.
....Ave overrun on #lbs butter sold...21.69.
....Ave price received for butter...56.70c/lb.
....Ave price paid for butter fat...64.21c.
....Received for butter shipped to NY & Chicago...$115,252.70.
....Received for store butter...$10,992.80.
....Received for patrons' butter...$10,143.77.
....Butter carried to next year...$262.88.
....Total received for butter...$136,492.49.
....Received for cream...$2092.43.
....Received for buttermilk...$96.60.
....Total received...$133,681.52.
....Paid patrons for cream...$113,332.18.
....Paid patrons for milk...$1,202.65.
....Patrons' butter...$10,143.77.
....Hauling by patrons....$3,758.42.
....Expenses...$10,244.50.
....Supplies on hand...$373.99.

...1920Dec22, West.Union.IA paper:  The annual meeting of the Fayette Mutual Creamery association was held in the county agent's office.  The financial report showed business was very satisfactory, with an increase of abt. $18k over last year. The total business done was almost $170k.  Elected were:  F.A. Kiel, Pres; Adam Shafer, V.P., P.E. Jubb, Sec.  Directors:  Wm. Barnes, W.H. Turner, J.R. Cook, Herb Pattison, L.E. Bennington.

...1921Feb10, Fayette.IA paper:  Bids will be received by directors of the Fayette Mutual Creamery Association, at the creamery office, for the purchase of buttermilk made by the creamery for the coming year.  The buttermilk will be sold on the basis of the amount produced from each 100lbs of butter produced.  Peter E. Jubb, Sec. 
.....Note:  Buttermilk was sold to area famers which in turn would use it has a swine food as a protein and nutrient supplement.

...1921May05, West.Union.IA paper:  Fayette news; The patrons of the Fayette creamery had their cream scored before 200 or more patrons for the first time in the contest mention last week.

...1921Sep15, West.Union.IA Paper:  Fayette news; Frank Heath vs R.E. Glew and Fayette Creamery association.  Suit on account for cream in dispute between landlord and tenant.

...1921Sep21, Fayette.IA paper:  Peter Banning died suddenly while engaged in hauling cream destined for the Fayette Creamery.

...1921Dec21, West.Union.IA paper:  Fayette Creamery does well, produces 44,000 lbs more butter than in 1920 (Total lbs butter made in 1920...240,545). The annual meeting was held in the county agent's office.  Elected were:  F.A. Kiel, Pres; Adam Shafer, V.P.; C.R. Carpenter, treasurer; F.E. Finch, Sec.  Directors:  Wm. Barnes, Herb Pattison, L.E. Bennington, W.H. Turner, J.R. Cook.  Bids will be received by the directors for hauling cream and the letting of the cream routes for the coming year.

...1922Jan26, Fayette.IA paper:  Bids will be received by the Fayette Mutual Creamery association for buttermilk, which will be sold in one day lots to the highest bidder.  The buttermilk for each day in the week must be sold at this time to make a sale of any of it, and sold on the basis of the buttermilk from each 100lbs of butter made.

...1922Mar16, Faeytte.IA paper:  Town Council:  The alley vacated in bk8 of J.E. Robertson's 2nd addition, will be sold in parcels to Robert Wright,  the Fayette Mutual Creamery association and the Farmers' Cooperative Shipping Association of Fayette, for the sum of $15 each.

...1922May17, West.Union.IA paper:  Fayette news; A new cream vat was recently installed at the Fayette Creamery.

...1922Dec20, West.Union.IA paper:  The Fayette Mutual Creamery association met Dec 9.  The creamery made 34,000 lbs. more of butter than in 1921, and receipts were $7,900 more.  Offices elected:  F.A. Kiel, Pres; Adam Shafer, V.P.; C.R. Carpenter & F.E. Finch treasurers; secretary, P.E. Jubb.  Directors:  Wm. Barnes, W.H. Turner, Herb Pattison, J.R. Cook, Lester.E. Bennington.

...1922Dec22, Fayete.IA paper:  The Fayette Mutual Creamery Association has done exceptionally well this year, making 34,000lbs of butter more than last year, with receipts $7,900 more. Officers elected:  F.a. Kiel, Pres; Adam Shafer, V.P.; C.R. Carpenter & F.E. Finch, treasurers; P.E. Jubb, Sec.  Directors:  Wm. Barnes, W.H. Turner, Herb Pattison, J.R. Cook, L.E. Bennington.

...1923Jun21, Fayette.IA paper:  To patrons of the Fayette Mutual Creamery, if you do not have a good place to cool your cream, take a look at the cooler being used on the E.C. Fussell farm or the one at the Fayette creamery.  A good cooling tank, with running water is absolutely necessary to bring your cream to the creamery as sweet as it should be.  Cream which is too sour makes acid butter which will not bring top prices, and your checks are accordingly not as large as they would be, if we could have only good, sweet well cooled cream.  These coolers are very reasonable in price and the extra price received for the better butter will soon pay for the cooler.

...1924Aug14, West.Union.IA paper:  H. Donaldson, 2nd man at the Fayette Creamery has resigned and will move to Hawkeye for business.  His place has been taken by Waldo S. Walker (Waldo would become postmaster).

...1925Dec23, West.Union.IA paper:  Peter Jubb was elected secretary of the Fayette Mutual Creamery Co. for the 26th year.    The only change in offices was J.F. Meihe as a directory.  F.A. Kiel is Pres.  Lester Bennington, Walt Turner and John Gray are directors.
....Fred Stevenson of Oelwein, state creamery/diary inspector, gave a talk about the importance of scrupulous cleanliness from cow to churn if the buttermaker is to maintain a high standard of quality which means more dollars. 
....The matter of paying for cream on the basis of score was discussed, but no change adopted.  As it stand now, patrons of the Fayette creamery who send in sour cream get the same price per pound as those taking extra care to send in sweet cream.  There is no incentive to take care of the cream except the knowledge that the buttermaker can make a superior product with superior cream.
....To sell as 'New York extras,' butter must score 93 or higher; 87-93 grades as first; 80-87 as seconds, 75-80 as thirds, below 75 as fourths.  Two other lower grades are known as packing stock and grease.  The butter score of the buttermaker's butter follows very closely to the score of the cream furnished off the farms.
....The market pays premium above New York extras for butter that scores high with flavor that is fine, sweet, clean, fresh.  People will pay the price for butter that they like. 
....The big centralized creameries with their gathered cream and long held produce, simply cannot compete with the produce of local co-operative creameries for extra fine product.

...1926Dec15, West.Union.IA paper:  The annual meeting of the Fayette Mutual Creamery association was held Dec 13, in the Cozy theater, with 140 patrons present.  The former officers were elected:  Pres. F.A. Kiel; V.P. Adam Shaffer; Sec J.H. Morf; State & First National Banks as treasurer.  Directors:  W.H. Turner, Lester Bennington, John Gray, Herb Pattison, and Harry Stiles to take the place of john Miehe.
....The creamery's annual business is about the same as last year.

...1927June15, West.Union.IA paper:  Twenty-five butter men of District 11 were guests of Fayette buttermaker Charles Pinch.  The usual trial scoring and butter contest were held. 

...1927Dec, Cedar.Rapids.IA paper:  Fayette paper news; Dairy Feed Scant, Fayette Creamery's decreased production reflects short crop (corn, oats, hay) condition.   The Fayette Mutual Creamery association for the last three weeks of 1925Nov,  shipped 217 tubs of butter, and for the same period 1927Nov, shipped 127 tubs.
....Dairymen in the area say they do not have the roughages to construct their rations properly, and also finding their grain supplies of corn and oats short.  Pastures were short during the summer and fall.  The weather conditions have been unfavorable for both grain and grass/hay production.
....Butter receipts at the big markets where fresh butter is shipped are about the same as last year or a little larger, thus prices for butterfat and butter will remain about the same across the country.  And roughage supplies in the country as a whole are plentiful.
....The past officers were re-elected.

...1929Dec19, Fayette.IA paper:  At the annual meeting of the Fayette Mutual Creamery association.  Officers elected:  Henry Hettler, Pres; R.R. Fussell, V.P.; M.H. Morf, Sec; State Bank of Fayette, treasurer.  Directors:  L.E. Bennington, Geo. Clendenen, A.E. Baker, J.R. Wood, L.A. Kiel.
....Cash on hand...$2,946.35.
....Rec. N.Y. butter...$104,601.16.
....Rec. store butter...$11,106.93.
....Rec. Patrons' butter...$7,022.30.
....Rec. buttermilk...$713.41.
....Prints on hand...729.
....Total lbs butter made...277,234.
....Total lbs butter fat....255,234.   
....Over run %...23.3.
....Ave. net price for NY butter...44.37c/lb.
....Ave price paid for butter fat...49.76c.lb.
....Coal on hand...$248.50.
....Paid for coal in creamery...$361.01.
......Total coal...$599.51.
....Coal in creamery...$50.00.
....Coal used for year...$549.51.
...Disbursements:
....Cream checks pd out...$112,079.49.
....Pd for hauling cream...$5,237.86.
....Acid, oil, color, salt, cleansers, etc...$592.25.
....Repair...$90.33.
....Labor...$7.50.
....Salaries...$4,090.94.
....Freight, express & dray...$142.82.
....Telephone...$27.20.
....Butter tubs, liners, wrappers & cartons...$2,167.89.
....Water...$51.00.
....Coal....$2,165.29.
....Insurance....$264.38.
....Taxes....$151.58.
....Printing and postage...$90.88.
....Dues...$10.00.
....Churn....$230.89.
....On notes...$1650.00.
....Interest...$297.00.
....Sundries...$5.23.
....Banlance in Bank...$2,480.35.
...Total...$132,406.74.


the 1930's

...1930Jan30, Fayette.IA paper:  Advertisement;  Butter occupies a unique position amount the food fats because of its richness in Vitamin A.  Another reason why you should use butter.  Substitutes may be spreads but butter is a healthy food.  Eat More Butter...Fayette Mutual Creamery Association.

...1932Jan23, Fayette.IA paper:  The Fayette Mutual Creamery Ass'n will hire cream haulers for the various cream routes. 
...1932Jan23, Oelwein.IA paper:  Henry Mettler, who owns a farm west of Fayette.IA, is president of the Fayette Mutual Creamery Association, The Fayette Livestock Shippers (Shipping) Association and the Fayette Co. Guernsey Breeders Association.  He is also on the town council & school board, a director of the Farm Bureau and sec. of the Fayette Community Club.

...1932Sep07, Greene.IA paper:  Dumont news (Bremer.Co); Joe Westholder resigned as manager of the Farmers Cremery.  Eldon Otterstein is in charge of the creamery at present. 
.....Note:  About 1949, Eldon Otterstein will become the Fayette Creamery Association buttermaker, and remain in Fayette until the Creamery closed in 1966.

...1933Apr13, Sumner.IA paper:  C.H. Pinch who was buttermaker at Maynard at one time, has succeeded Arthur Bentz as the buttermaker at the Fayette Mutual Creamery.

...1935Apr17, Oelwein.IA paper:  Advertisement; Fayette Mutual Creamery Association, Mfg. of Quality Butter, and Mill Feeds...for sale Oyster Shell & Salt. The Fayette Mutual Creamery provides a first class market for pure cream.  They are able to provide a higher grade of butter than creameries that operated hundreds of miles from the local supply of cream.  Art (Archie) Wood, Sec'y, phone 143.

...1937Jan14, Fayette.IA paper:  Bids will be received for the sale of buttermilk by the Fayette Mutual Creamery.  Archie E. Wood, Sec.

...1937Feb25, Oelwein.IA paper:  The Fayette Mutual Creamery took bids and let the creamery route SW of Fayette, recently held by Harvey Zbornik, to Clint Watkins.

...1937Apr15, Arlington.IA paper:  Real Estate Transer; Fayette Shipping Association to Fayette Mutual Creamery Association..the W55ft of Lots 10 & 11, in Bk 8, of the J.E. Robertson's Addition of Fayette, and west 1/2 of that portion of the vacated alley of Blk 8, lying east of said Lot 6 in J.E. Robertson's Addition.

...1937Jul09, Fayette.IA paper:  Advertisement; Binder twine, 2 grades, for sale at $7.76 & $8.00 per cwt., plus tax, by the Fayette Mutual Creamery association.

...1937Dec30, Fayette.IA paper:  The Fayette Mutual Creamery manufactured a total of 253,815lbs of butter in 1937, that sold for an average of 33.5c/lb, and the average price paid for butterfat was 38.1c.

...1938Jul14, Fayette.IA paper:  A rumor is current about Fayette that the "creamery bridge" at the east end of Water street is to be removed, and that the road on the other side of the Volga river is to be continued on that side, to the west, until it connects with the Lima road, at the end of the Main street bridge.  There are already some objections to this procedure being heard.

...1939Feb01, Oelwein.IA paper:  The Fayette Mutual Creamery company has received a new cream vat of one of the latest makes, which is run by electricity (old one would have been gas engine powered) and will be an improvement to their present equipment.

...1939Mar30, Fayette.IA paper:  Notice of renewal, amended and substituted articles of incorporation for the Fayette Mutual Creamery Association.  The corporation shall continues for another 20yrs, to 1959Feb09, unless dissolved by 2/3 vote of its members, or by law.  Note:  Basically the bylaws remained as in the original 1919 charter.  Officers:  Theo Miehe, Pres; R.R. Fussell, V.P.; Archie E. Wood, Sec.; State Bank of Fayette, Treasurer. 


By July 1939, the 'Creamery Bridge' crossing would be stopped and the road
on the east side of the Volga River continue on to connect to the Lima road on the north.

...1939Dec14, Fayette.IA paper:  Fayette Creamery meeting was held at the Cozy Theatre on Sat., with a large attendance.  Routine business was transacted.  Directors elected for 3yrs:  E.J. Langerman, R.R. Fussell & Geo. Clendenen.  Directors held over are J.R. Wood, Archie Baker, L.A. Kiel and Frank Holtman.  The directors will hold a meeting to choose officers.
......Receipts:
....Cash on hand...$3087.46.
....New York butter...$64,542.30.
....Store butter...$7,027.30.
....Patrons' butter...$5,003.24.
....Buttermilk...$561.65.
....For cream hauling for patrons...$4,164.60.
....Salt, brushes, cleanser, etc...$57.60.
....Cheese...$569.60.
....SS, Sales Tax, collected from employees & patrons...$86.93.
....Total Receipts....$85,100.68.
....Print butter on hand...917lbs.
....Butter shipped to New York...260,754 lbs.
....Butter sold to stores....25,616 lbs.
....Butter sold to patrons...18,610 lbs.
....Sub total....305,987 lbs.
....Print butter on hand...969 lbs.
....Total butter make for 1939...304,928 lbs.
....Butterfat received...246,247.
....% of overrun...23.8%.
....Ave price received for butter...24.9c/lb.
....Ave price paied for butterfat...27.7c/lb.
....Total manufacturing cost...$6,128.40.
....Cost of manufacturing butter...2c/lb.
.....Disbursements...
...Cream checks to farmers....$68,208.92.
...Paid for cream hauling...$4,164.60.
...Salaries...
.....A.H. Bentz...$1,260.00.
.....B.C. Timm...$603.75.
.....A.E. Wood...$480.00.
.....Directors' Fees and Mil...$85, $2,429.65.
...For acid, color, salt, cleanser, etc...$473.65.
...Tubs, liners, cartons, wrappers, etc...$818.87.
...Power & lights...$233.76.
...Coal...$471.16.
...Water...$3.08.
...Freight & express...$31.88.
...Telephone rent and tolls...$20.19.
...Printing & postage...$36.22.
...Insurance...$130.38.
...Property tax...$134.66.
...License fees, sales tax, social security, unemployment...$343.75.
...Butter advertising tax...$129.28.
...Renewal of Articles of Incorporation...$68.80.
...Pasteurizers...$2,638.00.
...Cheese...$573.05.
...Sundries...$54.10.
...Cash on hand...$3,434.47.
.....Total...$85,100.68.

 


 the 1940's

...1940Feb01, Fayette.IA paper:  Amendment to articles of incorporation for Fayette Mutual  Creamery Association, as of 1939Dec09;  "The Corporation may conduct a purely mutual and cooperative retail business of mill feeds, twine, and any commodities the Board my deed it advisable for the members."  "The Corporation shall collect milk, or cream, and manufacture the same into butter or other dairy products and to sell the same."  All patrons who furnish milk or cream according to the general rules adopted by the Board, sharing equitably in expenses and profits.  R.R. Fussell, Pres;  Archie E. Wood, Sec.  (Roy R. Fussell, b.1876Jul05, son of Mary Kingsbury & Martin H. Fussell passed away on 1941Mar21)

...1940Dec26, Fayette.IA paper:  At the annual meeting of the Fayette Mutual Creamery association, officers elected were:  L.A. Kiel, Pres. succeeding Roy R. Fussell; Roy R. Fussell, V.P., succedding E.J. Langerman; A.E. Wood, Sec.; R.A. Swartz, Treasurer.  Remaining directors area, Frank Holtzman, Geo. Glendenen, E.J. Langerman, J.W. Crain and E.L. Clegg.  Re-elected was Arthur Bentz buttermaker and Bryce Timm assistant.

...1941Feb06, Fayette.IA paper:  Bids will be received for the sale of buttermilk.  Fayette Mutual Creamery.

...1941Sep17, Oelwein.IA paper:  The Fayette Mutual Creamery has installed a new churn of modern design, which they purchased from the Creamery Package Co. at Waterloo.IA. 

...1942Oct29, Fayette.IA paper:  Adertisement;  For winter eggs--and a healthy flock.  Use any of these poultry feeds...Bolson's 20% full basket egg mash...Bolson's 26% grain balancer....Bolson's 36% concentrate for mixing with your own grain.  Fayette Mutual Creamery...This is a good place to trade...Archie Wood, Sec.

...1942Dec17, Fayette.IA paper:  Annual meeting of the Fayette Mutual Creamery Association.  Geo. Glendenen was re-elected as director for another 3yrs.  New directors for 3yrs are Paul & Mervin Doughty, who are succeeding Henry Mettler and Ed Langerman.  Sec. Archie E. Wood gave a report:  Creamery production for 1942 was, $122,025.22 of which $105,505.32 was sold on the New York market; $9,327.15 to local stores and $7,192.75 to patrons of the creamery.  A.H. Bentz is the buttermaker.
...Cash on hand...$3748.60.
...Butter sold to N.Y....$105,505.31.
...Butter sold to stores...$9,327.17.
...Butter sold to patrons...$7,192.75.
...Buttermilk sold...$1,098.26.
...Collected from patrons for cream hauling...$4,926.37.
...Salt, brushes, cleanser, etc....$144.57.
...Cheese sold...$740.59.
...Social Security, sales tax collected from employees & patrons...$242.19.
...Sundries...$216.11.
Disbursements included the following:
...Cream checks to patrons...$114.142.87.
...Paid for cream hauling...$4926.38.
...Salaries:
....A.R. Bentz...$1,302.50.
....B.C. Timm...$346.25.
....Doyle Nefzger...$392.50.
....A.E. Wood...$566.25.
...For acid, salt, cleanser, etc....$543.17.
...For tubs, liners, cartons, wrappers, etc....$1216.60.
...Power and lights....$503.59.   
...Coal...$598.97.
...Water...$3.39.
...Freight and expenses...$95.96.
...Telephone rent and tolls...$26.48.
...Printing and postage...$118.13.
...Insurance...$151.45.
...Property tax...$135.38.
...License fees, sales tax, SS, unemployment tax...$447.96.
...Butter advertising tax...$162.94.
...Final payment on loan and interest...$844.00.
...General repairing of equipment, etc....$613.11.
...Repairing building...$53.30.
...Cheese (purchased for resale)...$595.90.
...Sundries...$77.92.
...Cash on hand...$4797.61.
.....Total...$133,142.67.

...1943Jan28, Oelwein.IA paper:  At the recent meeting of the directors of the Fayette Mutual Creamery Co, Doyle Nefzger, ass't. buttermaker was hired at buttermaker and Walter Briggs of Fayette was hired as assistant buttermaker.

...1944Mar23, Fayette.IA paper:  Advertisement; Good Baby Chicks...should have a good starter.  Bolson's 19% Centerfed Peep Chick Starter is the last work in really high quality starter.  Ask those who feed it.  Fayette Mutual Creamery.  Hogs...give them all the corn they will clean up, a nice clean place to sleep, lots of water and keep Bolson's Hi-Test Mineral Protein Conditioner before them.  t goes farther than tankage and does what tankage cannot do. 

...1944Aug24, Fayette.IA paper:  Doyle Nefzger wins high butter score...At the buttermakers' meting of district 11, held at West.Union, Doyle Nefzger of the Fayette Creamery submitted a tub of butter with 12 others, and received a score of 94, which was 5th in the scoring, the other high scores being 95, 94.75, 94.5, 94.25.

...1944Nov16, Fayette.IA paper:  Advertisement; Get your mill feed cheaper by getting it off car.  The Fayette Creamery will have a car on the track soon.  Phone 143.

...1944Dec14, Cedar.Rapids.IA paper:  The Fayette Mutual Creamery elected:  L.A. Kiel, Pres; Geo. Glendenan, V.P.; A.E. Wood, Sec; R.A. Swartz, treasurer.  Directors:  Isaac Paul, Mervin Doughty, H.W. Greenough, Glen Bennington
.....Butter made...310,530 lbs.
.....Butter shipped to N.Y. & Chicago market...276,838 lbs.
.....Butter sold to stores...20,373 lbs.
.....Butter sold to patrons...13,406 lbs.
.....Butter on hand...460 blbs.
.....Receipts for butter, buttermilk, sundries, sales & other taxes...$150,598.17.
.....Total disbursments...$146,491.31.
.....Balance on hand...$4,106.36.

...1945Jul31, Fayette.IA paper:  Real Estate Transfers; Fayette Mutual Creamery Ass'n to L.H. and Helen Stranahan...Warranty Deed, $1...W55ft of lots 10&11 & N 30ft of lot 9, in block 8 of J.E. Robertson's 2nd Addition to Fayette.IA, and part of alley adj.  Note:  This will become the Stranahan Feed Mill operation adjacent and to the north of the Creamery building.
...1945Aug29, Faeytte.IA paper:  Excavation work has been practically completed for the basement and foundation of the L.H. Stranahan Feed Mill, which is soon to be moved from the location adjoining the Fayette Soybean Mill, to the lot just north of the Fayette Creamery.

...1945Dec20, Fayette.IA paper:  Creamery business shows increase.  Re-elected were:  Geo. Glendenen, Mervin Doughty, Isaac Paul.  Hold-overs were Glenn Bennington, Charles E. 'Charley' Clark, H.W. Greenough, and L.A. Kiel, Pres.  There was a 12% gain in 1945 over 1944.
....Receipts:
....Cash on hand...$4,106.36.
....Butter shipped to markets...$132,411.13.
....Local print butter...$7,340.43.
....Patrons' print butter...$4,409.61.
....U.S. Gov. butter payments...$17,266.10.
....Buttermilk sales...$1337.95.
....Sales of salt, brushes, cleanser, etc....$96.73.
....Sales tax, SS & withholding collected...$884.92.
....Sundries...$1,096.04.
......Total...$168,949.27.
....Print butter on hand...520 lbs.
....Butter shipped...321,192 lbs.
....Butter sold locally...17,227 lbs.
....Butter sold to patrons...9,975 lbs.
.....Total butter sold...348,914 lbs.
....Print butter on hand...460 lbs.
.....Total butter manufactured...348,454 lbs.
....Total butterfat received...281,569 lbs.
....% of overrun...24.1%.
....Ave prices received for butter...46.4c/lb.
....Ave price paid for butterfat...51.9c/lb.
....Total manufacturing cost...$8,703.12.
....Manufacturing cost per lb of butter...2.4c/lb.
....Inventory of supplies on hand...$1,570.47.
....Inventory of merchandise for resale on hand...$294.29.
...Disbursements:
....Patrons' cream accounts (checks)...$146,238.48.
....Paid for cream hauling...$7,039.55.
....Salaries:
....Doyle Nefzger, buttermaker...$2,442.61.
....A.J. Brown, ass't...$1,133.67.
....A.E. Wood, sec/business...$1,017.50.
....Directors' fees & mileage...$98.40.
......Total salaries....$4,692.18.
....for acid, salt, cleanser, etc....$731.56.
....Boxes, liners, cartons, wrappers, etc....$614.06.
....Power & lights...$567.08.
....Coal...$745.11.
....Water...$7.16.
....Freight & express...$38.07.
....Telephone rent and tolls...$44.60.
....Printing, postage, etc....$114.30.
....Insurance...$205.32.
....Property tax....$147.48.
....Butter advertising tax...$178.02.
....License fees, sales tax, social security, withholding, employment, transportation taxes...$1,328.29.
....General repairing of equipment, etc...$667.34.
....Repairing and painting building...$213.37.
....New equipment, stoker...$1,170.00.
....Merchandise purchased for resale...$299.91.
....Sundries...$135.38.
....Cash on hand...$3,682.13.
.....Total...$168,949.27.

...1945Dec31, Oelwein.IA paper:  Fayette Mutual Creamery, officers elected Geo. Glendenan, Mervin Doughty as V.P. and Isaac Paul for a 3yr term as directors.  Hold-over directors are Louis Kiel as Pres., Carley Clarke, Glen Bennington and Harry Greenough, Archie Wood as Sec, Russell Swartz as treasurer.  Business for 1945 amounted to a 12% gain over 1944.

...1946Jan03, Waterloo.IA paper:  Fayette news; The Fayette Mutual Creamery directors have been selected; George Glendenen, Mervin Doughty  and Isaac Paul for 3yr terms.  Holdover directors are Louis Kiel,  Charley Clark, Glen Bennington, Harry Greenough.  Kiel is Pres, Doughty V.P., Archie Wood is Sec, Russell Swartz of the Fayette State Bank is treas.

...1946May19, Waterloo.IA paper:  Evelyn Matthews & Duane Nefzgar married.  Both graduated from Fayette High School.  Duane has been in the army several months and received a medical discharge.  Duane is employed at the Fayette Mutual Creamery Co.

...1947Jan02, Fayette.IA paper:  The annual meeting of the Fayette Mutual Creamery Association will be held at the American Legion Hall, 1:30pm, 1947Jan11.
...1947Jan16, Fayette.IA paper:  Mervin  Doughty elected chairman of the board, LeRoy Henniges as vice-chairman, Arachie E. Wood as Sec, R.A. Swartz as Treas.  Julius Wegner and Charlie E. Clark elected to serve 3yr terms, with Leroy Henniges for 2yrs, filling the vacancy by the resignation of Geo. Clendenen.   Holdover directors are Mervin Doughty, L.A. Kiel, Glenn Bennington and Isaac Paul.  Doyle Nefzger, buttermaker.  Business in 1846, totaled $206,162.92.  Butter manufactured was 335,271 lbs.  Ave. net price received for butter and butterfat was 57.8c/lb.   Ave. paid for butterfat was 67.1c/lb.

...1947Jan23, Waterloo.IA paper:  Fayette news; Frank Bright buttermaker at Iowa Falls the last 13yrs (1933>1946) has been hired at the buttemaker at the Fayette Mutual Creamery Association, to succeed Doyle Nefzger who recently resigned.  Frank comes highly recommended.
...1947Mar20, Fayette.IA paper:  Mrs. Charles Pooler sold her town home/property on West Water St to Mr/Mrs Frank Bright.  (in 2000+, across from Blimpies, today's SE corner of Water & 'new' Hwy150).

...1947Jun19, Fayette.IA paper:  Adertisement;  For years, butter was scarce (during the WWII years), but now there is plenty once more.  Use lots of delicious, high-score Iowa butter.  Fayette Mutual creamery Ass'n.

...1947Sep03, Oelwein.IA paper:  Fayette news; Geo. H. Glendenen passed away 1947Aug27; born 1874Jun13, near Colesburg.IA.  Served on Fayette Creamery board for 18yrs.

...1948Jan24, Oelwein.IA paper:  The annual meeting of the Fayette Mutual Creamery association was held at the Fayette theater, 1:30pm, 1948Jan10.  C.A. Hogan, Iowa State  dairy/food inspector was the speaker.  Officers:  Re-elected Pres. Merwin Doughty; V.P. Leroy henneges; Sec. Archie E. Wood; Treas. Russell Swartz.  Frank Bright rehired as buttermakerCream haulers: Roscoe Cousins, Loyd Holtzman, Donald Dean, Ronald Moore.

...1948Oct03, Cedar.Rapids.IA paper:  Interview with Dale Blaker, 47, farming 91acres, 3/4 mi south of Fayette, married with 3ch.  Bought the farm in 1944, moved to it 1945.  Milking 9 cows, with stanchions for 12 head, but will not fill them until get farm built up so have enough alfalfa & pasture.  Sell cream to the creamer and not milk, as need the skim milk for pigs and calves, or would have to buy something to take its place.  Raising 55 hogs; feed was short so sold sow & pigs in spring.  Will not increase hogs until catch up on feed.  (Note: The old Belnap farm, west of the cemetery)

...1949Jan18, Oelwein.IA paper:  The Fayette Mutual Creamery Association held its annual meeting Sat., at the American Legion Hall.  Fred Gernan of Volga City, spoke on 'Quality of the Products and Cooperation with the Partron.'  Iowa State dairy inspector Clair A. Hogan spoke on the laws proposed in the Legislature relative to the creamery industry.  Officers elected:  Rex Roberts, Ralph Sinnott and Isaac Paul were re-elected for 3yrs.  Holdover directors are:   Charles Clark 1yr, Louis Kiel 2yrs, Julius Wegner 1yr, Glen Bennington 2yrs.  Archie E. Wood is Sec, and Frank Bright buttermaker
...$193,128.71 worth of butter was shipped in 1948.
...$14,171.01 represented local print butter.
...$10,602.48 was sold to patrons. 
...$1,332.54 of buttermilk sold to patron farmers.
...235,964 lbs butter shipped.
...17,594 lbs sold to local stores.
...13,026 lbs sold to patrons.
...276,335 lbs total butter manufactured.
...222,063 lbs total butterfat received.
...78.3c/lb average net price received for butter.
...92.3c/lb average price paid for butterfat.
...$10,399.41 total manufacturing cost.

...1949Feb20, Waterloo.IA paper:  Eldon Otterstein of the Bremer Creamery near Waverly (from abt 1939>1948), has been hired as the new buttermaker of the Fayette Mutual Creamery.  Edon has 19 yrs as buttermaker.   He is married with one son (Roger).  Frank Bright, the Fayette buttermaker the last 2yrs, resigned Feb 1.  Clarence Darrah of Elmo is supplying as buttermaker until Otterstein takes over in March. 

1949> 1965, creamery closed... Eldon Otterstein would remain as the Fayette buttermaker until the creamery is bought off and closes in 1965.  Eldon was a very successful buttermaker who consistently placed at the top of butter contests with his Fayette butter.

 ...1949Nov02, Oelwein.IA paper:  Fayette news; Mr/Mrs Eldon Otterstein, Fayette buttermaker, will move to the residence vacated by the Gehrke family.

...1949Nov09, Oelwein.IA paper:  Eldon Otterstein, buttermaker at the Fayette Mutual Creamery, while assisting in some repair work at the creamery, suffered an injury resulting in the loss of the first finger on his right hand.  He was immediately taken to the West.Union hospital for medical care. 

 


the 1950's

...1950Jan26, Oelwein.IA paper:  Fayette news; At the annual meeting of the Fayette Mutual Creamery Association, Chas. Clarke and Julius Wegner, V.P.,  were re-elected as directors.  Holdover directors were Louis Kiel, Glen Benningon, Ralph Sinnott, Rex Roberts and Isaac Paul, Pres.  Eldon Otterstein has hired as buttermaker for another year.  Archie E. Wood is Sec.

...1950Jul27, Oelwein.IA paper:  Creamery meeting at Arlington; The Iowa creamery operators of sec 11, met at Arlington.  Butter scores were:  first, Joe Barnes of Alpha;  tied for second, Fleet Frieden of West.Union and Ned Cernand of Volga; third, Walter Waskow of Waucoma.  Men's judging:  tied for first, J.F. Barnes of Alpha and Eldon Otterstein of Fayette; second, Fred Cernand of Volga; third, W.A. Schroeder of Randalia.  Women's judging:  first, Mrs. J.F. Barnes of Alpha; second, Mrs. Fred Mitchel of St. Lucas; tied for thrid, Mrs. Fred Cernand of Volga, Mrs. W. A. Schroeder of Randalia, Mrs. Walter Waskow of Waucoma.

...1950Nov10, Dubuque.IA paper:  The Fayette Mutual Creamery has purchased the residence of Mr/Mrs John Fay on King.St.  The company's new buttermaker, Eldon Otterswein will live there.  The Fays will move to a new residence on S. Washington.St.

...1851Jan18, Oelwein.IA paper:  Annual meeing of the Fayette Mutual Creamery Associaion, held Jan10.  Officers elected:  Pres. Issac Paul, V.P. Julius Wegner, Sec. Archie e. Wood, Treas. Russell Swartz.  Directors:  Max Miller took the place of Glen Bennington & Sheldon Chittenden took the place of Louis Kiel.  Eldon Otterstein is buttermaker.  Other directors are Charlie E. Clark, Rex Roberts, Ralph Sinnott. 
...290,477 lbs butter manufactured in 1950.
...233,567 lbs butterfat received.
...62c/lb, average net price received for butter.
...96c/lb, average net price paid for butterfat.
...$11,930.23 cost of manufacturing.
...262,509 lbs butter shipped.
...11,983 lbs butter sold to patrons.
...17,287 lbs butter sold locally.

...1951Jan23, Oelwein.IA paper:  County buttermakers hold Maynard meeting.  Albert Wallskog of Maynard and Eldon Otterstein of Fayette tied for first place in butter.

...1951Nov19, Waterloo.IA paper:  Hawkeye.IA, Creamery operators of Sec 11 meet/elect;  In the butter judging contest, Eldon Otterstein of Fayette was awarded top place.

...1952jan11, Cedar.Rapdis.IA  paper:  Annual meeting of the Fayette Creamery Assn at the Farm Bureau building.  Officers chosen:  Ralph Sonnott Pres took the place of Issac Paul who after 9yrs on the board declined re-election, Julius Wegner V.P., R.E. Cousins Sec succeeded Archie E. Wood who served as Sec the past 21 years, R.A. Swartz Treas.  Dirtectors:  Charlie E. Clark, Max Miller, Sheldon Chittenden, Wayne Butterfield.  Eldon Osterstein, buttermaker.  Total of 268,120 lbs butter manufactured in 1951.

...1953Jan22, Fayette.IA paper:  Fayette Creamery annual meeting214,054lb of butter made in 1952;  Myron Shepard was elected and Julius Wegner was re-elected to the board of directors of the Fayette Mutual Creamery Association, at the Farm Bureau building on north Main.St.  Julius Wegner was re-named V.P.  Hold-over board memebers are Ralph Sinott, Pres; Max Miller, Sheldon Chittenden, Rex Roberts and Wayne Butterfield.  Eldon Otterstein was re-hired as buttermaker, R.E. Cousins as Sec.  Disbursements to patrons on cream accounts amounted to $141,281; 214,054 lbs. of butter  was produced. Charlie E. Clark is the out going director who did not seek re-election.

...1953Sep10, Fayette.IA paper:  Fayette will host the Northeast Iowa Dairymen on Tues, 1953Sep22, 1pm in the Legion Hall.  Dairymen from an 11 county area will attend to discuss the proposal to increase the scope of nation-2ide dairy research and advertising.  The plan involves the voluntary payment of 1/2 cent/lb of butterfat marketed during a 10 month perios. 

...1954Jan15, Fayette.IA paper:  The Fayette Mutual Creamery Association held the annual meeting in the Farm Bureau building, with about 75 members present.  Max Miller was re-relected to the board and Paul Voshell was named to complete the terms of Sheldon Chittenden.  Re-elected:  Ralph Sinnott, Pres; Julius Wegner, V.P.; Eldon Otterstein was rehired as buttermaker and Roscoe E. Cousins as Sec.  Cream haulers will be re-employed next week.  During the  past year, 600 lbs. of butter has been manufactured a week more than a year ago.

...1954Apr29, Fayette.IA paper:  Advertisement;  At Goeken's Food Center & Smith & Sons Mkt., Fayatte Creamery Butter, 59c/lb, longhorn cheese 39c/lb.

1955...Major Creamery upgrade of stainless steel equipment, with buying both whole milk and cream.

...1955Jan28, Oelwein.IA paper:  Fayette Mutual Creamery Association; Amendment to Article V, "The Association shall not become indebted for more than $40,000 over and above sums due patrons as dividends on current business."

...1955Jul19, Oelwein.IA paper:  Fayette news--Fayette Creamery lets contract for new equipment; Plans have been completed and contracts let by the Fayette Cooperative Creamery for new milk receiving equipment, plus installation, with contracts calling for completion by Aug15. 
.....At that time, cream and whole milk will both be boughtWhole milk will be separated and butterfat manufactured in the local plantSkim milk will be sold to a creamer in Milwaukee.WI. 
.....The new program has been set up after careful study by the board of directors and the approval of the patrons at the last annual meeting, to furnish a local market for those farmers who wish to sell whole milk (rather than separating on the farm and selling cream).
.....Pres. Ralph Sinnott;  Asst.Sec Rosco Cousins, Sec & Treas. Max Miller, Asst. Treas. Russell Swartz.  Directors:  Wayne Butterfield, Julius Wegner, Dale Roberts, Myron Shepard and Paul Voshell.  Haulers: Lloyd Holtzman, Kenneth Gray, Roscoe Cousins and Beryl Boleyn.  Eldon Otterstein, buttermaker.
.....The new equipment, worth $20,000, includes a surge tank, separator, cooling plate, storage tank, and receiving  equipment to include scales, and all new dumping tanks.  All equipment is stainless steel.

...1955Jan20, Fayette.IA paper:  Fayette Creamery is to handle bulk milk in addition to cream; butter output is up.  Plans for an expanded program including the construction of a cheese plant (Note:  Cheese production did not get attempted) and the processing of whole milk were approved at the annual meeting in the Farm Bureau.  Patrons voted five to one in approval of the expansion.
.....The new cheese plant will be equipped to manufacture any cheese the market demands.  Work on the new construction will begin soon.  Note:  The cheese operation never materialized.
.....Buying of whole milk will be in addition to handling cream as in the past. 
.....Re-elected to the board, Wayne Butterfield, Ralph Sinnott.  Dale Roberts to fill vacancy left by his father, Rex Roberts who declined nomination due to health.
.....$109,781 butter sold in New York, 1954.
.....$13,551 butter sold local.
.....16,000 lbs more butter produced over 1953.

…1955Jul21, Fayette.IA paper:  Buttermilk sale.  Bids will be received Monday, 1955Jul25, 8pm, at the Creamery Office.  The buttermilk will be sold in one day lots at the basis of the amount of buttermilk from each 100lbs of buttermilk made.  Fayette Coop Creamery Association.

...1955Jul21, Fayette.IA paper:  Annoucement;  Beginning 1955Aug15, the Fayette Coop Creamery Association will furnish a ready market for whole milk or cream.  Through low overhead expense, and low transportation costs, we can pay you more for your Dairy products.  Why not let us prove this in black and white....Fayette Coop Creamery Association.

…1955Jul28, Fayette.IA paper: Ad;  Beginning 1955Aug15, the Fayette Coop. Creamery Association will furnish a ready market for whole milk or cream.  Through low overhead expense, and low transportation costs, we can pay you more for your Dairy products.  Why not let us prove this in black and white.

...1956...Name change:  From the Fayette Mutual Creamery Association to the Fayette Coop Creamery Association.

...1956Jun14, Fayette.IA paper:  Advertisement; Get Fayette Butter at Andres' Clover Farm Store, Chase's Superette, Goeken's Food Market, Larry's Dairy, Smith & Sons Grocer, Thrifty Food Mart.  Also served by Coffee Nook Cafe, College Cafeteria, G.&B. Cafe, Glady's Truck Stop, Ralph's Place....Fayette Cooperative Creamery Ass'n.

...1956Oct02, Oelwein.IA paper:  Real Estate Tranfer:
.....Fayette Mutual Creamery Association to The Fayette Coop Creamery Assn. (WD) $1, Lots 7&8, except N 30', Lot 9, Blk 8 & 1/2 alley on east side, in J.E. Robertson 2nd Add. to Fayette.IA.
.....Fayette Mutual Creamery Association to The Fayette Coop Creamery Assn. (WD) $1, Lots 9, 10, 15, 16, in Blk 6 of J.E. Robertson 2nd Add. to Fayette.IA.

...1957Feb13, Fayette.IA paper:  The Fayette Cooperative Creamery Association held its annual meting at the Farm Bureau building, Wed at 12pm.  Pres Ralph Sinnot presided.  Sec. Roscoe Cousins presented the annual report. 
...1957Feb28, Fayette.IA paper:  The annual Fayette Co-op Creamery Assn. meeting was held at the Farm Bureau building.  There has been a 17% gain in membership, and a 34,449 lbs gain in butter made.  Butter and other products sold outside local trade, $138,874.70.  Two directors were elected, Berton Odekirk to succedd Max Miller, who declined the nomination, and Paul Voshell was re-relected.  The board then elected Ralph Sinnett Pres, Julius Wegner V.P., Wayne Butterfield as Sec/Treas.  Eldon Otterstein was re-hired as buttermaker, Howard Fish as ass't to buttermaker and Russell Swartz as ass't treas.  The buttermilk will be sold in one day lots to the highest bidders. 
...1957Jun06, Fayette.IA paper:  Advertisement;  Goekin's Food Mkt, Fayette Creamery butter, 63c/lb.
...1957Aug09, Fayette.A paper:  Mr/Mrs. Otterstein & son Roger, are on a vacation fishing trip to Canada.  Robert Wilson of Lawler, is the buttermaker in charge during Eldon's absence.

...1958Feb20, Fayette.IA paper:  Bids for buttermilk, sold in one day lots to the highest bidders.  Fayette Coop Cry. Assn.
...1958JUn26, Fayette.IA paper:  Adertisement; Thrifty Food Mart, Fayette butter 59c/lb.

...1959Jan29, Oelwein.IA paper:  The annual meeting of the Fayette Creamery will be Wed, Feb04, at the Farm Bureau building.

...1959Aug26, Cedar.Rapids.IA paper:   Fayette.Co Fair butter showing; Louis Lehman of Elgin, exhibited 96 score butter to win the butter show.  Eldon Otterstein of Fayette, was 2nd with 95.5 score butter.

...1959Oct30, Fayette.IA paper:  Mr/Mrs Eldon Otterstein attended the Buttermaker's Convention at Cedar Rapids.  Eldon received a 95 score and an excellent rating on the tub of butter he took, and also a silver medal on the year's rating.


the 1960's

...1960Jan14, Arlington.IA paper:  Annual meeting of the Fayette Creamery, 1pm, Jan20. 

...1961May06, Oelwein.IA paper:  Ernest Schuler of Oelwein and Eldon Otterstein of Fayette, were among 16 Iowa buttermakers who scored superior for butter at the Dairy Industry Conference in Ames. 
.... Buttermaking contest, butter is judged forFlavor, body, color, salt, keeping quality, composition, extraneous matter, yeast and mold combined with bacteria, each were countied for or against the buttermaker, who could achieve a total of 100 points.

...1961Dec28, Fayette.IA paper:  Elden Otterstein, buttermaker at the Fayette Creamery, placed first with his butter entry at the Iowa Creamery Operations Association , section 11, meeting at Volga City.

...1962Oct04, Fayette.IA paper:  Elden Otterstein, buttermaker at the Fayette Creamery placed among the 7 high of 103 entries, with his butter entry at the National Dairy Cattle Congress contest in Waterloo.IA.  His score was 99.  He has been employed at the local creamery for the past 13 yrs (1949).

...1962Nov02, Cedar.Rapids.IA paper:   Sec11 of the Iowa Creamery Operators Association elected officers at Volga.IA; Eugene M. Seehand of Volga as Pres, Ed Lundt of Maquoketa Valley Co-op of Arlington as V.P., Duane Jelling of Oelwein as Sec/Treas.  Three top butter samples entered were made by Eldon Otterstein of Fayette, Don Neumann of LIttleport and Tom Weston of West.Union.  Highest average butter scores for the year's section meetings were compiled by Seeland, Weston and Otterstein.

...1963...Creamery board/director members:  Pres. Ralph Sinnott, V.P. M.L. Sheppard, Sec. Wayne Butterfield, Ass't. Sec. Archie E. Wood, Paul Voshell, f.B. Garner, Bernard Rhode, Glen Bennington.

...1963Jun27, Fayette.IA paper:  Better service for patrons; the Fayette Cooperative Creamery recently purchased a 2000gal bulk tank truck in order to give milk and cream patrons in the Fayette area the most modern milk handling service possible.  The truck has been leased to Howard Popenhagen.  The tank truck is available to all dairy farmers in the area who are interested in sending their milk to the Fayette Creamery in this manner.  This method is a convenience to the farmers who are equipped to store their milk in a bulk tank.  The Fayette creamery has as fine and modern equipment, as any creamery in the area, and pays a competitive price.  After many years of operation on the banks of the Volga River, in the northeast corner of Fayette (on east Water.St, at the north end of Jones.St), the Fayette Creamery Co. was reorganized and incorporated as the Fayette Mutual Creamery Association on Feb 1, 1919. 

...1963Oct30, Oelwein.IA paper:  Randalia news; Mr/Mrs. Eldon Otterstein of Fayette and Mrs. Bill Schroeder of Randalia, attended the buttermakers convention at Mason.City.

...1964Feb27, Fayette.IA paper:  Ad; Annual Meeting, Fayette Cooperative Creamery Assocaiton, will be held at the Farm Bureau Building.  Business meeting and election of officers.  Ralph Sinnott, Pres.
...1964Jun18, Fayette.IA paper:  Ad; Fayette Co-op Creamery Asso., manufacturers of quality butter.


1965, thee end of an era!!
The 1960's began the rapid demise of moderate sized family/general farming operations,
resulting in the loss of rural population and rapid demise of rural villages & life-style.
Larger and larger grain farms and livestock confinements developed, along with supporting businesses.
Buy-outs became the sign of the times as the bigger became bigger.
Fences and farmsteads were removed across Iowa as fields were dozed/drained and plowed road to road.

1965...The Fayette Creamery is bought out by the Meinerz corporation and closes, equipment is moved, the building/grounds sold.

...1965Mar11, Fayette.IA paper:  Advertisement; Fayette Co-op Creamery with the cooperation of Meinerz Creamery of Fredericksburg, is sponsoring a pancake and sausage supper for famers and wives in the Fayette area, Mar 16, 7:30pm, at the Farm Bureau Building,  Bernie Meinerz, of Milwaukee.WI speaker.

...1965Sep23, Fayette.IA paper:  Ad; We Salute the Fayette County 4-H members & Leaders...among the list, the Fayette Coop. Creamery Ass'n, Phone 425-3303.

...1965Oct...The Fayette Creamery was sold to the Meinerz Creamery Co. of Fredericksburg.IA. The Harlan Creamery at Maynard also was bought out by Meinerz and likewise ceased operation.

…1965Ocr28, Fayette.IA paper:  Fayette Creamery has sold (and the Harlan Creamery at Maynard will cease operation); The Fayette Cooperative Creamery was sold to the Meinerz Creamery Co., of Fredericksburg on Tuesday, 1965Oct19, and has ceased operation at the local plant.  Patrons, however, will not notice much of a change, because of the local haulers will continue to pick up the milk, hauling it to the Westgate Creamery which was also recently purchased by the Meinerz Creamery.  Three trustees, Ralph Sinnott, Myron Shepperd, Glenn Bennington were appointed to finish the business of the Fayette Creamery.

…1965Oct28, Fayette.IA paper:  Representatives of the Fayette Cooperative Creamery met with the Board of Education of the Fayette Community school district.  The creamery group offered the former creamery building for sale to the school board for use as an industrial arts building.  There was no action taken by the school board.

...1966Feb03, Fayette.IA paper:  For Sale; Fayette Creamery building.  Here is a building with approx. 2500 sq. ft. of space.  All cement floors.  There should be many uses for this building and you can buy it right.

..1978Feb, Fayette.IA paper:  Long time Fayette Creamery buttermaker, Eldon Otterstein passed away.

Return to top


William Orear & James Beatty started a dairy operation in 1842, but James left the next year.
William & Mary nee Wilcox Orear operated the first dairy farm/creamery in Fayette County, Iowa, about 1843-1846.
At the Wilcox 'settlement' area on the Mission Trail, 2mi south of today's Main.St, Fayette village.
Milking 20-30 cows, supplying milk, butter, cheese to the Mission (St.Lucas) & Fort Atkinson in Winnesheik.Co.IA.

William Orear is the son of John Orear.
William's wife Mary Wilcox was the sister of Franklin Wilcox who built the first permanent cabin in Fayette.Co.IA.

Descendants of John William Orear

1 OREAR, John William b: 22 Jun 1786 in Frederick.Co.VA d: 25 Oct 1856 in Carollton, Carroll.Co.MO Note 6: Mar 1838 John O'Rear, farmer & Christian Ch. Deacon, Frankford area, Peno.Twp, Pike.Co.MO. Note 10: 1850 Census: Carroll.Co.MO. ORear: John65VA farming $1k, MaryA17VA, John Ford12MO; adj b/law Adam Clinkscles50VA farming $450 & son Wm. Orear33VA & family. Note 11: 1850 Slave.Schedule: John Orear, slave owner in Carroll.Co.MO. Note 14: 09 Nov 1853 Gov.Land Sales: John Orear, Carroll.Co.MO, N1/2 of SE1/4, Sec 5, T51N, R25W.

.. +CLINKSCALES, Mary 'Polly' b: 30 Jan 1790 in Frederick.Co.VA d: 18 Feb 1850 in Carollton, Carroll.Co.MO Burial: Oak Hill Cem, Carrollton, Carroll.Co.MO m: 1811 in Henry.Co.VA Father: William CLINKSCALES Mother: Nancy COLBERT

2 OREAR, Mary A. b: 08 Sep 1812 in VA

2 OREAR, Robert b: 1814 in VA

2 OREAR, William Clinkscales b: 20 Sep 1816 in Culpeper.Co.VA d: 01 Jul 1898 in Maryville, Polk.Twp, Nodaway.Co.MO Burial: Miriam Cem, Maryville, Nodaway.Co.MO Note 3: Surname analogs: Orear, Orear, Orrear. Note 6: Bet. 1840 - 1841 Migrated on the Mississpi River from VA to Pike/Ralls.Co.MO > Dubuque.Co. > Delaware.Co > Fayette.Co.IA. Note 8: Bet. 1841 - 1842 Built cabin with James Beatty, 200yds SW of Wilcox Cabin on Mission Trail. Note 9: Abt. 1844 Running first dairy in Fay.Co.IA, deliverting to Ft. Atkinson. Note 11: 1850 Census: Carroll.Co.MO. ORear: WilliamC33VA farmer, MaryA nee Wilcox28NY, LauraA5IA, EliasD3IA, EllenI Isael12IL; adj to father John65VA farmer $1k. Note 15: 1860 Census: Maryville, Nodaway.Co.MO. Orear: WilliamC43VA merchant $3500/8200, Mary36NY, Laura14IA, Elias13IA. Note 17: 1870 Census: Maryville, Nodaway.Co.MO. Orear: WmC53VA retired merchant $10k/7k, MaryA40NY, Elias23IA no occupation $2k/1k; servant Bridget18Ire. Note 19: 1880 Census; Polk, Nordaway.Co.MO

.... +WILCOX, Mary Angeline b: 16 Jul 1820 in Erie.Co.NY d: 28 Jan 1886 in Maryville, Polk.Twp, Nodaway.Co.MO Burial: Miriam Cem, Maryville, Nodaway.Co.MO m: 25 Feb 1844 in Fort Atkinson, Winneshiek.Co.IA Father: Elias Dudley WILCOX Mother: Mary Polly CHITTENDEN

... 3 OREAR, Laura Ann b: 08 Apr 1845 in Fort Akinson, Winneshiek.Co.IA or Orear farm/dairy, NE line, Sec 5, Smithfield.Twp, Fay.Co.IA d: 09 Dec 1935 in Maryville, Polk.Twp, Nodaway.Co.MO Burial: Oak Hill Cem, Maryville, Nodaway.Co.MO

....... +BEAL, Thaddeus Koscusko b: 25 Dec 1825 in Clay.Co.MO d: 03 Jul 1879 in Maryville, Nodaway.Co.MO Burial: Oak Hill Cem, Maryville, Nodaway.Co.MO m: 08 Apr 1866 in Maryville, Nordaway.Co.MO

..... 4 BEAL, Mary Emaline b: 01 Mar 1867 in Maryville, Nodaway.Co.MO d: 01 Mar 1867

..... 4 BEAL, Alice Lillian b: 17 Oct 1868 in Maryville, Nodaway.Co.MO d: 07 Sep 1931

..... 4 BEAL, Ralph Walden b: 05 Dec 1870 in Maryville, Nodaway.Co.MO d: 03 Mar 1872

..... 4 BEAL, Bertha D. b: Abt. 1872 in Maryville, Nodaway.Co.MO d: 24 Jan 1960 in Maryville, Nodaway.Co.MO

..... 4 BEAL, Thaddie K. b: in Maryville, Nodaway.Co.MO d: 1875

... 3 [1] OREAR, Elias Dudley b: 02 Dec 1847 in Fort Dodge, Webster.Co.IA d: 07 Apr 1923 in Maryville, Polk.Twp, Nodaway.Co.MO Burial: Miriam Cem, Maryville, Nodaway.Co.MO

....... +NELSON, Mary Belle b: 21 Sep 1860 in Andrew.Co.MO d: 07 Jun 1923 in Maryville, Polk.Twp, Nodaway.Co.MO Burial: Miriam Cem, Maryville, Nodaway.Co.MO

..... 4 OREAR, May b: 1879 in Maryville, Polk.Twp, Nodaway.Co.MO

..... 4 OREAR, Buelah b: 1881 in Maryville, Polk.Twp, Nodaway.Co.MO

... *2nd Wife of [1] OREAR, Elias Dudley:

....... +NELSON, Mary B. m: 1877

..... 4 OREAR, Beulah

..... 4 OREAR, Mary b: 1876

2 OREAR, Malinda Jane b: 17 Nov 1818 in Culpeper.Co.VA d: 18 Jan 1910 in Lucas, Henry.Co.MO Burial: Mullin Cem, Urich, Henry.Co.MO

.... +SNEDIGAR, Robert M. A. b: 02 Aug 1814 in Bourbon.Co.KY d: 12 Feb 1863 in Springfield, Greene.Co.MO (Civil War?) m: 09 Jul 1837 in Frankford, Peno.Twp, Pike.Co.MO Father: Robert SNEDIGAR Mother: Mary 'Polly' BUTLER Note 8: 1850 Census: Ray.Co.MO. Snedigar: Robert34KY farmer $800, Malinda31VA, MarthaJ12MO, MaryM10MO, SarahC4MO. Note 11: 22 Dec 1861 Enlisted Conf. Army, 3inf, Ri-Ta, in Cedar.Co.MO, age 47.

... 3 SNEDIGAR, Martha Jane b: 17 Jun 1838 in Frankford aera, Peno.Twp, Pike.Co.MO d: 22 Nov 1873 in Hardin, Ray.Co.MO

....... +MASON, Thomas J. b: 05 May 1830 in Missouri d: 14 Dec 1889 in Hardin, Ray.Co.MO

..... 4 MASON, Five Children b: in Missouri

... 3 SNEDIGAR, Mary Magdaline b: 02 Apr 1840 in Frankford aera, Peno.Twp, Pike.Co.MO d: 28 Oct 1923 in Henry.Co.MO

....... +MCDONALD, Josiah Greene b: 26 Sep 1836 in Mechanicsburt, Sangamon.Co.IL d: 30 Nov 1923 in Henry.Co.MO Father: John Harrod MCDONALD Mother: Elizabeth KNIGHT

..... 4 MCDONALD, Seven Children b: in Missouri

... 3 SNEDIGAR, John William b: 20 Feb 1842 in Pike or Ray.Co.MO d: 20 Feb 1942 in Pike or Ray.Co.MO

... 3 SNEDIGAR, Sarah Catherine b: 25 Mar 1846 in Richmond, Ray.Co.MO d: 14 Jan 1872

....... +LEE, William b: 1842 in KS

2 OREAR, Benjamin C. b: 21 Sep 1820 in VA d: 30 May 1850 in Carollton, Carroll.Co.MO

2 OREAR, Nancy C. b: 08 Aug 1822 in VA d: 26 Mar 1853

2 OREAR, Catherine b: 03 Dec 1824 in Henry.Co.VA d: 09 Oct 1911 in Carrollton, Carroll.Co.MO Burial: Oak Hill Cem, Carrollton, Carroll.Co.MO

.... +HUDSON, Repps Bedford b: 09 Apr 1827 in VA d: 11 Dec 1901 in Carollton, Carroll.Co.MO Burial: Oak Hill Cem, Carrollton, Carroll.Co.MO m: 05 Jun 1849 in Carroll.Co.MO Father: David HUDSON

... 3 HUDSON, Four Children b: in Carollton, Carroll.Co.MO

2 OREAR, Sophia R. b: 30 Dec 1825 in VA d: 01 Nov 1849 in Carollton, Carroll.Co.MO Burial: Oak Hill Cem, Carrollton, Carroll.Co.MO

2 OREAR, Susan Marie 'Susie' b: 24 Sep 1831 in Culpeper.Co.VA d: 28 Aug 1925 in Richmond, Ray.Co.MO Burial: Richmond Cem, Ray.Co.MO

.... +SNOWDEN, Wilburn b: 31 Jan 1822 in Ray.Co.MO d: 11 Mar 1908 in Richmond, Ray.Co.MO Burial: Richmond Cem, Ray.Co.MO Father: Jacob SNOWDEN Mother: Mary Ann RUSELL

... 3 SNOWDEN, Five Children b: in Ray.Co.MO


The Ellis Co., Crown Creamery, 1880-1888
The first creamery in Fayette.IA was set/owned by David Ellis & Sons
David Ellis and brother Jonathan were early, major wholesale produce merchants in Boston.
David Ellis would set up several 'first' creameries about 1880, in NE Iowa, as the butter industry moved westward.

Descendants of Eleazer Ellis

1 ELLIS, Eleazer b: 10 Jan 1661/62 in MA d: 25 Dec 1730 in Dedham, Norfolk.Co.MA

.. +THRUSTON, Mehitable b: 09 Sep 1667 in Medfield, Norfolk.Co.MA d: 24 Apr 1749 in Dover, NOrfolk.Co.MA

2 ELLIS, Eleazer b: 23 Sep 1692 in Dedham, Norfolk.Co.MA

.... +CROSBY, Mary b: 1699 d: 1785

... 3 ELLIS, Timothy b: 14 Sep 1724 in Dedham, Norfolk.Co.MA d: 13 Jul 1817 in Keene, Cheshire.Co.NH

....... +MILLET, Elizabeth b: 1723 d: 29 Apr 1810 in Keene, Cheshire.Co.NH

..... 4 ELLIS, Millet b: 1739 d: 1841

..... 4 ELLIS, Joshua b: 22 Jan 1753 in Dedham, Norfolk,Co.MA d: 04 Oct 1826 in Keene, Cheshire.Co.NH Note 8: 1790 Census: Keene, Cheshire.Co.MA. Joshua Ellis, family of 12, 5m/7f.

......... +RUSSELL, Sarah 'Sally' b: 1753 in MA d: 1793 in Keene, Cheshire.Co.NH

........ 5 ELLIS, Abel b: 1776 in MA d: 1823

........ 5 ELLIS, Lucy b: 1778 in MA d: 1854

........ 5 ELLIS, Sally b: 1780 in MA d: 1853

........ 5 ELLIS, Lois b: 1781 in MA d: 1835

........ 5 ELLIS, Betsey b: 1783 in MA d: 1845

........ 5 ELLIS, Joshua b: 18 Apr 1785 in Dedham, Norfolk,Co.MA d: Sep 1838 in Keene, Cheshire.Co.NH Burial: Washington Cem, Keene, Cheshire.Co.NH

............ +PARKER, Nepzabeth 'Elizabeth' b: 1788 in Keene, Cheshire.Co.NH d: 26 Feb 1873 in Keene, Cheshire.Co.NH Burial: Washington Cem, Keene, Cheshire.Co.NH m: Jan 1807 in Keene, Cheshire.Co.NH

........... 6 ELLIS, George W. b: 29 Jan 1809 in Keene, Cheshire.Co.NH d: 10 Feb 1892 in Swanzey, Cheshire.Co.NH

............... +FARWELL, Louisa b: 1818 d: 1856

........... 6 ELLIS, Lois E. b: 02 Dec 1811 in Keene, Cheshire.Co.NH d: 24 Oct 1898 in Keene, Cheshire.Co.NH

............... +CHAPMAN, William Heaton b: 1809 d: 1839

........... 6 ELLIS, Josuha Parker b: 1814 in Keene, Cheshire.Co.NH d: 15 Apr 1872 in Keene, Cheshire.Co.NH

........... 6 ELLIS, David b: 21 Jun 1817 in Keene, Cheshire.Co.NH d: 13 Jun 1895 in Cambridge, Middlesex.Co.MA Burial: Mount Auburn Cem, Cambrige, Middlesex.Co.MA. Note 5: 1850 Census: Cambridge, Middlesex.Co.MA. Ellis: David32NH butter & cheese dealer $2800, Mary31NH, Mary6MA, Helen3MA, Charlotte Phillips26MA servant; adj.to brother & partner Daniel Ellis29NH. Note 6: 1855 Census: Cambridge, Middlesex.Co.MA. Ellis: David38NH trader, Mary37NH, MaryA11MA, FarnkD4MA, Sylvia Russell19NH servant. Note 8: 1860 Census: Waltham P.O., Cambridge, Middlesex.Co.MA. Ellis: David43NH butter & cheese dealer $1800/3k, Mary 42NH, Mary16MA, Frank9MA, Henry1MA, Anna12NH, Margaret Sullivan30NovaScotria domestic. Note 9: 1861 Boston.Directory: Ellis David & Co. (J.R. Ellis), produce 3 Merchants row, hm. at N. Cambridge. Note 10: 1870 Census: Cambridge, Middlesex.Co.MA. Ellis: David53NH produce dealer $15k/30k, MaryM52NH, MaryA26MA, DavidF19MA bookkeeper for produce business, Harry11MA, Gunner G. Brooks19Ire servant. Note 12: 1880 Census: North Ave, Cambridge, Middlesex.Co.MA. Ellis: David62NH produce dealer, MaryM62NH, MaryA35MA, Harry/Henry20MA cleark in produce business.

............... +KINGSBURY, Mary Ann b: Abt. 1818 in NH d: 06 Apr 1886 in Cambridge, Middlesex.Co.MA

............. 7 ELLIS, Mary Ann b: 1844 in Cambridge, Middlesex.Co.MA d: Abt. 1910 in Cahmpaign.Co.OH

................. +UNMARRIED

............. 7 ELLIS, Helen b: 1847 in Cambridge, Middlesex.Co.MA d: Bef. 1855 in Cambridge, Middlesex.Co.MA

............. 7 ELLIS, David Frank b: 1851 in Cambridge, Middlesex.Co.MA d: Aft. 1910 in Cambridge, Middlesex.Co.MA Note 6: 1860 Census: Waltham P.O., Cambridge, Middlesex.Co.MA. Ellis: David43NH butter & cheese dealer $1800/3k, Mary 42NH, Mary16MA, Frank9MA, Henry1MA, Anna12NH, Margaret Sullivan30NovaScotria domestic. Note 10: 1870 Census: Cambridge, Middlesex.Co.MA. Ellis: David53NH produce dealer $15k/30k, MaryM52NH, MaryA26MA, DavidF19MA bookkeeper for produce business, Harry11MA, Gunner G. Brooks19Ire servant. Note 12: 1880 Census: 8 Roseland.St, Cambridge, Middlesex.Co.MA. Ellis: D.Frank29MA butter merchant, AddieM26MA, M.Helen5MA. Note 20: 1910 Census: Roseland.St, Cambridge, Middlesex.Co.MA. Ellis: David Frank59MA widower proprietor real estate & insurance, dau MaryH35MA, son ParkerK12MA, boarder Katherine Carr36NY teacher, Catherine Cushing44NY seervant, sister MaryA Ellis66.

................. +KINGSLEY, Addie M. b: Abt. 1854 in MA d: Bef. 1910 in Cambridge, Middlesex.Co.MA m: 27 Nov 1873 in Cambridge, Middlesex.Co.MA

................ 8 ELLIS, Mary Helen b: 1875 in Cambridge, Middlesex.Co.MA

.................. 9 ELLIS, Parker K. b: 1898 in NY

............. 7 ELLIS, Henry 'Harry' b: 31 Jul 1859 in Cambridge, Middlesex.Co.MA d: 1895 in Cambridge, Middlesex.Co.MA

................. +SAUDNERS, Jennie Flagg b: 1860 d: 1920

................ 8 ELLIS, Norman Kingsbury b: 01 Aug 1886 in Cambridge, Middlesex.Co.MA d: 02 Aug 1886 in Cahmpaign.Co.OH

................ 8 ELLIS, Edward Whittemore b: 18 Dec 1889 in Cambridge, Middlesex.Co.MA d: 11 Apr 1965 in Los Angeles, Los.Angeles.Co.CA

.................... +SMITH, Florence Giffors b: 1874 d: 1971

.................. 9 ELLIS, Edith Jane b: 1921 d: 2002

.................. 9 ELLIS, Nancy Anne b: 1922 d: 2005

........... 6 ELLIS, Jonathan Russell b: 11 Aug 1821 in Keene, Cheshire.Co.NH d: 22 Mar 1886 in Cambridge, Middlesex.Co.MA Note 6: 1847 Established J.R. Ellis Wholesele Produce, Market.St, Boston.MA. Note 8: 1850 Census: Cambridge, Middlesex.Co.MA. Ellis: J.Russell29NH produce dealer $3k, Emiline30NH, StearnsR2MA, EmmeryR1mMA, domestic Ann GusiserNH. Note 11: 1861 Boston.Directory: Ellis J.R. (D. Ellis & Co.), produce, 3 Merchants row, house at Cambridgeport. Note 12: 1870 Census: Cambridge, Middlesex.Co.MA. Ellis: JonathanR49NY produce dealer $14k/25k, Emeline49NH, StearnsR22MA produce dealer $1k, EmmonsR20MA produce dealer, MariaA.G.15, FlorenceE12MA, Ann Grimes65NH.

............... +STEARNS, Emiline b: 19 Feb 1820 in Keene, Cheshire.Co.NH d: 20 Jan 1898 in Cambridge, Middlesex.Co.MA m: 28 Sep 1843 in Cambridge, Middlesex.Co.MA Father: Jotham STEARNS Mother: Mary GRIMES

............. 7 ELLIS, Emma Stearns b: 20 Sep 1846 in Cambridge, Middlesex.Co.MA d: 12 Mar 1847 in Cambridge, Middlesex.Co.MA

............. 7 ELLIS, Stearns Russell b: 18 May 1848 in Cambridge, Middlesex.Co.MA d: 08 Mar 1924 in Cambridge, Middlesex.Co.MA Note 8: 1850 Census: Cambridge, Middlesex.Co.MA. Ellis: J.Russell29NH produce dealer $3k, Emiline30NH, StearnsR2MA, EmmeryR1mMA, domestic Ann GusiserNH. Note 12: 1870 Census: Cambridge, Middlesex.Co.MA. Ellis: JonathanR49NY produce dealer $14k/25k, Emeline49NH, StearnsR22MA produce dealer $1k, EmmonsR20MA produce dealer, MariaA.G.15, FlorenceE12MA, Ann Grimes65NH. Note 14: 1880 Census: Forest.St, Cambridge, Middlesex.Co.MA. Ellis: StearnsR33MA produce dealer, EllenA29MA, MargaretL5MA, domestic Margaret O'brien18MA; close is 1st cousin D.Frank Ellis29MA butter merchant. Note 15: Business.Card: J.R. Ellis & Sons Wholesale Produce Commission Dealers, Established 1847, 50&51 S. Market.St and 3 Chatham.St, Boston, Stearns R. Ellis & Emmons R. Ellis. Note 16: First cousin of David Ellis, Ellis Butter and Cheese Dealer, Boston, who with sons established a serious of creameries in NE Iowa, late 1870's to late 1880's+. Note 18: 1900 Census: Forest.St, Cambridge, Middlesex.Co.MA. Ellis: StearnsR51MA butter merchant, EllenA59MA, domestic Annie Davis30NC. Note 19: 1909 American Produce Review: RobertW Belknap & Stearns Ellis, 2 of most prominent butter merchants in Boston (were active in butter trade with NE iowa). Note 20: 1910 Census: Forest.St, Cambridge, Middlesex.Co.MA. Ellis: StearnsR61MA proprietor wholesale produce, EllenA59MA, domestic LeonaM Beals36MA. Note 22: 1920 Census: Forest.St, Cambridge, Middlesex.Co.MA. Ellis: StearnsR71MA produce merchant, EllenA68MA, domestic Leona Beals45Can.

................. +BENNETT, Ellen Adelaide b: Apr 1851 in Cambridge, Middlesex.Co.MA d: 1932 in Cambridge, Middlesex.Co.MA m: 07 Aug 1871 in Medford, Middlesex.Co.MA

................ 8 ELLIS, Margaret L. b: 1875 in Cambridge, Middlesex.Co.MA

............. 7 ELLIS, Emmons Raymond b: 12 May 1850 in Cambridge, Middlesex.Co.MA d: 25 Nov 1918 Note 8: 1850 Census: Cambridge, Middlesex.Co.MA. Ellis: J.Russell29NH produce dealer $3k, Emiline30NH, StearnsR2MA, EmmeryR1mMA, domestic Ann GusiserNH. Note 12: 1870 Census: Cambridge, Middlesex.Co.MA. Ellis: JonathanR49NY produce dealer $14k/25k, Emeline49NH, StearnsR22MA produce dealer $1k, EmmonsR20MA produce dealer, MariaA.G.15, FlorenceE12MA, Ann Grimes65NH. Note 15: Business.Card: J.R. Ellis & Sons Wholesale Produce Commission Dealers, Established 1847, 50&51 S. Market.St and 3 Chatham.St, Boston, Stearns R. Ellis & Emmons R. Ellis. Note 16: First cousin of David Ellis, Ellis Butter and Cheese Dealer, Boston, who with sons established a serious of creameries in NE Iowa, late 1870's to late 1880's+.

................. +LIBBEY, Emma L. b: 1850 d: 1883

................ 8 ELLIS, Ruth Libbey b: 1879 d: 1916

................ 8 ELLIS, Artemas Russell b: 1883 d: 1959

............. 7 ELLIS, Maria A. G. b: 12 May 1855 in Cambridge, Middlesex.Co.MA d: 31 May 1933 in Cambridge, Middlesex.Co.MA

................. +JOHNSON, Goerge Perry b: 1851 d: 1936

............. 7 ELLIS, Florence Emiline b: 22 Dec 1857 in Cambridge, Middlesex.Co.MA d: 08 Feb 1935 in Cambridge, Middlesex.Co.MA

................. +SAWYER, George Augustus b: 1857 d: 1922

........... 6 ELLIS, Daniel b: 1821 in Keene, Cheshire.Co.NH Note 8: 1850 Census: Cambridge, Middlesex.Co.MA. Ellis: Daniel29NH butter and cheses dealer, ElizabethA27NH; adj to brother & partner Davie Ellis32NH.

............... +UNKNOWN, Elizabeth A. b: 1823 in NH

... 3 ELLIS, Mehetable b: 1720 d: 1758

2 ELLIS, Mehitable b: 1695 d: 1750

Return to top


Eldon Otterstein was a master buttermaker at the Fayette.IA Creamery,
 the longest serving buttermaker, from1949 to when it closed in 1965.

Descendants of Christian Friedrich Otterstein

1 OTTERSTEIN, Christian Friedrich b: 27 Aug 1843 in Alt Rudnitz, Kr. Konigsberg, Nm, Brandenburg, Germany d: 26 Feb 1887 in Williamstown, Dodge.Co.WI

.. +MILLER, Mary Margaret 'Marie' b: Feb 1857 in Germany d: 18 Nov 1932 in Dumont, Pittsford.Twp, Butler.Co.IA Note 5: 1900 Census: Hampton, Franklin.Co.IA. Otterstein: Mary43Ger immigrated 1890 widow 3ch/3living, Sam20WI, John19WI, Elmer16WI (sons day laborers); sister Minnie Zell56Ger widow. Note 7: 1910 Census: Dumont, Pittsford.Twp, Butler.Co.IA. Otterstein: JohnW29WI farming, Eliza28IA, Royal5IA, Goldie3IA, mother Mary53Ger 3ch/2living.

2 OTTERSTEIN, Samuel John 'Sam b: 25 Aug 1879 in LeRoy, Dodge.Co.WI d: 28 Oct 1934 in Dumont, Pittsford.Twp, Butler.Co.IA

2 OTTERSTEIN, John William 'Bill' b: 03 Jan 1881 in LeRoy, Dodge.Co.WI d: May 1972 in Rock City, Stephenson.Co.IL Note 6: 1900 Census: Hampton, Franklin.Co.IA. Otterstein: Mary43Ger immigrated 1890 widow 3ch/3living, Sam20WI, John19WI, Elmer16WI (sons day laborers); sister Minnie Zell56Ger widow. Note 8: 1910 Census: Dumont, Pittsford.Twp, Butler.Co.IA. Otterstein: JohnW29WI farming, Eliza28IA, Royal5IA, Goldie3IA, mother Mary53Ger 3ch/2living. Note 10: 1920 Census: Dumont, Pittsford.Twp, Butler.Co.IA. Otterstein: JohnW39WI farming, Eliza38IA, RoyalW15WI, GoldenL12WI, EldonE9IA. Note 12: 1930 Census: Dumont, Pittsford.Twp, Butler.Co.IA. Otterstein: John49WI farming, Eliza48IA, Eldon19 telephone lineman. Note 14: 1940 Census: Rock.Run.Twp, Stephenson.Co.IL. Otterstein: Royal35IA farmhand, Florence35WI, son robert6WI, father John58WI farmhand.

.... +BAUMGARTNER, Eliza 'Lizey' b: 01 Sep 1881 in Dumont, Pittsford.Twp, Butler.Co.IA d: 08 Sep 1937 in Freeport, Stephenson.Co.IL m: 18 Feb 1903 in Dumont, Pittsford.Twp, Butler.Co.IA Father: John Jacob BAUMGARTNER Mother: Matilda Rebecca 'Tilly' TRUMBAUER

... 3 OTTERSTEIN, Royal W. b: 22 Dec 1904 in Dumont, Pittsford.Twp, Butler.Co.IA d: 08 Feb 1987 in Rock City, Stephenson.Co.IL

....... +BRINKLEY, Helen Esther b: 23 Feb 1908 in Stockton, JoDaviess.Co.IL d: 25 Oct 1990 in IL

... 3 OTTERSTEIN, Golden Leroy 'Goldie' b: 07 May 1907 in Dumont, Pittsford.Twp, Butler.Co.IA d: 07 May 1907 in Dumont, Pittsford.Twp, Butler.Co.IA

....... +COPLIEN, Erma Mildred b: 09 Jul 1907 in Sylvester.Twp, Green.Co.WI d: 31 Jul 1969 in WI

... 3 OTTERSTEIN, Eldon E. b: 27 Oct 1910 in Dumont, Pittsford.Twp, Butler.Co.IA d: 09 Feb 1978 in Fayette, Fayette.Co.IA Note 8: 1920 Census: Dumont, Pittsford.Twp, Butler.Co.IA. Otterstein: JohnW39WI farming, Eliza38IA, RoyalW15WI, GoldenL12WI, EldonE9IA. Note 10: 1930 Census: Dumont, Pittsford.Twp, Butler.Co.IA. Otterstein: John49WI farming, Eliza48IA, Eldon19 telephone lineman. Note 11: Sep 1932 Dumont.IA Farmers Creamery, manager resigned, Eldon Otterstein presently in charge. Note 12: Feb 1934 Austinville, Butler.Co.IA, Eldon Otterstein of Dumont, assiting Aage Neilson in the creamery operation. Note 13: Bet. 1934 - 1940 Stayed in Augsinville until taking over the creamery NE of Waverly. Note 16: 1940 Census: Warren.Twp (2-4mi NE of Waverly), Bremer.Co.IA. Otterstein: Eldon29IA creamery operator (buttermaker), Effie25IA. Note 18: Bet. 1949 - 1965 Master buttermaker at Fayette Mutual/Coop Creamery, Fayette.IA.

....... +JOHNSON, Effie Valentine b: 14 Feb 1915 in IA d: 29 Nov 2004 in Lodi, Columbia.Co.WI Father: Remko JOHNSON Mother: Renie UNKNOWN

..... 4 OTTERSTEIN, Roger b: Abt. 1940 in Waverly area, Bremer.Co.IA d: 31 Aug 2017 in Lodi, Columbia.Co.WI Note 10: 1958 Graduaated Fayette.IA High School.

......... +UNKNOWN, Tammy

2 OTTERSTEIN, Elmer Martin b: 24 Jan 1884 in LeRoy, Dodge.Co.WI d: 06 Jan 1906 in Bellingham.Co.IA

Return to top


 


 


 

Iowaz Index Page
Iowaz Photo Hosting Site


iowaz1@gmail.com or iowaz@swbell.net or iowaz@hotmail.com

Any reproduction of this site or it's contents requires express written consent.

Barry Zbornik
Hannibal, MO