Gilson
surname and burials
Fayette County Iowa


Oliver Leonard Gilson family
Master blacksmith & plough maker from Geauga.Co.OH.
Dairy farm & creamery (cheese factory & butter) NW Illyria.Twp/SW P.Val.Twp, Fayette Co, Iowa.

Overview and speculations:
Oliver Leonard Gilson 1826/VT-1917/KS
---In 1837, age 10-11yrs,  parents moved, VT to Auburn Corners, Auburn.Twp, Geauga.Co, in the NE corner of OH near the Lakes.
---By 1850, in their mid 20's, Oliver and brother Willard were accomplished blacksmiths apprenticing with their father Leonard Gilson.
---Either May of 1853 or 1854, Oliver, age abt. 28, took up land in sec 6 of Illryia Twp and sec 31 of Pleasant Valley Twp, Fayette Co, Iowa.
---By the time of his move to Iowa Oliver had a large variety of blacksmithing and tool making experiences, to include plough/plow making.   I have to speculate Oliver also had some actual practice in the cheese making process and had likely built tools/equipment for cheese making.  He grew up in Ohio in an early and major dairy and creamery (cheese/butter) area.  Ohio was the first location in America of cheese factories. Geauga Co was a leader in cheese production.  Oliver must have come to Iowa with knowledge of milk production and cheese making, and the ability/experience to make the necessary tools and equipment.
---Bet 1854-1856, Oliver was establishing a farmstead, pastures, small fields on timbered hill land that had never been farmed.
---After the 1856 census or perhaps before, Oliver was involved in setting up and running a plough shop in Grannis Canyon/Hollow at the Grannis Mill area being run by Alonzo Grannis.
...Oliver's tax base in the 1860 census for the plough shop at the Grannis Mill was one of the highest in Fayette Co, so the operation was up and running by the late 1850's.
...Willard Gilson, bro. of Oliver, came from Ohio after 1856, to assist on the farm development and likely with the plough shop set up.  Willard returned to Ohio by the late 1860's for the rest of his life.
...By 1864-1866 Oliver had a dairy herd producing milk on his hill pasture land and had a 'farm' creamery in operation.  George Gilson (1847-1906), son of Oliver, has grown up on the the farm and was now active in all levels of the developing family farm and dairy business. 
...The Gilson 'cheese factory' would have been operating by the mid 1860's, and perhaps earlier, as the 1870 census shows  a tax base of $7500/$1894, which is again high in real estate and property.
...In 1878 the Gilson's produced 1066# of butter in the cold months and 6674# of cheese during the warm month, averaging $50/cow from a herd of 20-30 head, perhaps more.  They may have been taking in some milk from nearby farmers but basically the operation was a self-contained family operation.
...The Gilson creamery is still in operating and on the 1896 plat. The 1900 census shows George living in and farming out of Wadena, Illryia.Twp, and father Oliver with him, however an 1901 notation from an obit indicates they are still on the Gilson farm with creamery in operation.
...George moved into West Union village 1902-1903, as did Oliver.  George bought the West Union grist/feed mill 1904-1905 to run with his son Harry.  George would pass away in 1906; Oliver in 1917 at his grandson Frank's home in Emporia, Lyon.Co.KS.
...Oliver Gilson, between about 28-38 years of age, was an impressive, skilled craftsman to be able to set up a major plough shop and cheese factory on the Fayette Co, Iowa, frontier.


....... 8 GILSON, Oliver Leonard
b: 24 Feb 1826 in Middletown, Middlesex.Co.VT
d: 22 Mar 1917 in Hm of g/son Frank in Emporia, Lyon.Co.KS
Burial: West Union Cem, Fay.Co.IA
Note 4: Abt. 1837 VT>MI 1837; MI>OH 1838; OH>Fay.Co.IA May 1853.
Note 5: 1850 Census; blacksmith, bro Willard & S.A.75yF/NY, with, Auburn.Twp, Geauga.Co.OH
Note 6: Bet. 1853 - 1854 OH to Pine Run, Genesee.Co.MI; with Chas Stafford family.
Note 7: May 1854 MI to farm in NW corner of Illyria.Twp, Fay.Co.IA.
Note 8: 1856 Census; farming, NW corner, Illyria.Twp, Fay.Co.IA; Geo Johnson family with.
Note 9: Abt. 1857 Bro Willard handling farm while Oliver set up blacksmith shop at Grannis Mill, sec 31, Illyria.Twp
Note 12: 1860 Census; Plough Maker, $6k/2500, sec 31, Illyria.Twp, Fay.Co.IA
Note 13: 1860 Plough shop adj to Alonzo B. Grannis Mill in Grannis Hollow.
Note 14: 1860 Census; Caroline Johnson & ch still with.
Note 15: Abt. 1864 Left plough shop to Grannis; set up creamery/cheese factory, sec 6,Illyria.Twp.
Note 17: 1870 Census; farming (creamery,cheese plant) $7500/1894, sec 6, Illyria.Twp, Fay.Co.IA.
Note 18: 1870 Raising nephew Charles Draper1858/IA.
Note 19: 1878 1066#butter, 6674#cheese, ave $50/cow (1st cheese factory in area).
Note 20: 1878 Hist; stock raiser & Home Dairy, Oliver & son Geo, cheese from 20-25 cows, butter in cold months.
Note 21: 1878 Stock raiser with son Geo on 275a, sec 6, llyria.Twp, P.O. West Union & Brainard.
Note 22: 1880 Census; farming & creamery with son Geo, sec 6, Illyrial.Twp, Fay.Co.IA.
Note 24: 1884 IA Gaz; proprietor, creamery, 6m E of West Union in sec 6, Illyria.Twp, Fay.Co.IA.
Note 25: Farm W of Illyria/Highland known as Gilson farm/place.
Note 26: 1900 Census; with son Geo, Wadena village, Illyria.Twp, Fay.Co.IA.
Note 27: 1901 Gilson Creamery still operated by Geo; Oliver gardening & fruit trees.
Note 28: Bet. 1902 - 1903 Retired into West Union village.
Note 29: Oibt; known as rugged, forceful, honest, sturdy of pioneer type.
............. +SMITH, Mary Jane
b: 27 Mar 1825 in Milton, Saratoga.Co.NY
d: 12 Mar 1896 in Sec 6, Illyria.Twp, Fay.Co.IA
Burial: West Union Cem, Fay.Co.IA m: 26 Nov 1845 in Auburn Corners, Geauga.Co.OH
Father: Unknown SMITH
Mother: Ruth SWEET



 

Iowaz Index Page
Contains webpage links to various Fayette Co. surnames and history projects.
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Last uploaded:  Oct 6, 2010


Gilson burials
 in Fayette Co, Iowa

Surname First, Middle Maiden Spouse or Parents Birth Death/Burial Cemetery City/Twp Notes

 


Colored rows = info/data updated,
brown on Oliver Leonard Gilson lin
e of the dairy farm in sec 6, Illyria.Twp & sec 31, Pleasant Valley Twp, and West Union,
orange on James Henry Gilson line
of the Oelwein and Hazelton area.  There is a connection back in Ohio of these two families but I could not find it.  I also speculate a connection to the Oliver Gilson line and my gggrandfather David Gilson Parson's who initially settled near the Illyria/Highland farm of Oliver but moved into early Fayette village in the mid 1850's. I am still searching for a Gilson/Parsons connection.
White rows = not updated, needing data. 

Gilson Agnes Beatrice Olson Gilson Donald Franklin 1903/WestUnion-1963/Postville Sep 25, 1904 Jan 26, 1999 Elgin Elgin Sec 4, Lot 52.  Dau of Julius Olson.  Ch; Loretta Mae, Durwin, Curtis.
Gilson Corinne Marion Wenger Gilson Oliver Wayne 1915/Elgin.IA-1997Elgin.IA Mar 9, 1921 No date Elgin Elgin Dau of Charles Wenger & Margaret Cook. Sec 5, Lot 117.  Ch: Gary, Karen, David.
Gilson Donald Franklin Gilson Olson Aganes Beatrice 1904/Decorah.IA-1999/Postville.IA Apr 18, 1903 Mar 27, 1963 Elgin Elgin Sec 4, Lot 52.  Son of Harry Baker Gilson 1880/Illyria.Twp-1963/WestUnion & Mabel Mae Shaffer 1880/Highland, Clayton.Co.IA. Ch; Loretta Mae, Durwin, Curtis.
Gilson Oliver Wayne Gilson Wenger Corinne Marion 1921/Elgin.IA Aug 27, 1915 May 16, 1997 Elgin Elgin Sec 5, Lot 117.  Son of Harry B. Gilson 1880/Illyria.Twp-1963/WestUnion & Mabel Mae Shaffer 1880/Fay.Co.IA-1962/Postville.IA.   G/son of Geo Monroe; gG/son Oliver.  Ch: Gary, Karen, David.
Gilson Harry Baker Gilson Shaffter Mabel Mae 1880/Fay.Co.IA-1962/Postville.IA Aug 27, 1880 Oct 12, 1963 ILLYRIA Cem ILLYRIA Twp Son of Geo Monroe Gilson 1847/OH-1906/Fay.Co.IA & Anna Marie Clark 1851/NY-1936/Fay.Co.Ia.  Ch; Donald Franklin, Dorothy, George, Oliver Wayne.
Gilson Mabel Mae Shaffer Gilson Harry Baker 1880/Illyria.Twp-1963/WestUnion. Jul 25, 1880 Jan 2, 1962 ILLYRIA Cem ILLYRIA Twp Dau of John D. Shaffer 1858/Bk.Hawk.Co.IA-1931/Fay.Co.IA & Susan C. Robbins 1859/Clayton.Co.IA-1923/Fay.Co.IA.  Ch; Donald Franklin, Dorothy, George, Oliver Wayne.
Gilson Adam L Gilson Gilson son of James Henry 10 Apr 1885 3 May 1909 Otsego Cem Jefferson Twp Lot 91. Son of James Henry Gilson 1848/OH-1928/Buchanan.Co.IA & Emmaline Hoppes 1846/PA-1928/Buchanan.Co.IA.
Gilson Clara Clary M Gilson Gilson dau of James Henry 1869 1886 Otsego Cem Jefferson Twp Lot 91.  Age 17y11m2d.  Dau of James Henry Gilson 1848/OH-1928/Buchanan.Co.IA & Emmaline Hoppes 1846/PA-1928/Buchanan.Co.IA.
Gilson Emmaline Hoppes Gilson James Henry 1848/OH-1928/Buchanan.Co.IA Sep 1846 1928 Otsego Cem Jefferson Twp Lot 91.  Ch; Clara M, Sarah j, Benjamin F, Cerilda, Henry James, John Ross.
Gilson James Henry Gilson Hoppes Emmaline 1846/PA-1928/Buchanan.Co.IA Jun 16, 1848 Feb 26, 1928 Otsego Cem Jefferson Twp Lot 91.  Son of Richard Gilson 1813/OH & Jane Unknown 1821/PA. Ch; Clara M, Sarah j, Benjamin F, Cerilda, Henry James, John Ross.
Gilson Anna Marie Clark Gilson Geo Monroe 1847/OH-1906/WestUnion.IA Dec 6, 1851 Jan 28, 1936 West Union West Union Dau of Issac Franklin Clark & Adah Lovina Cummings.  Ch: Franklin Leonard, Harry Baker, Ross D, Roy D, Ella Cummings, Glenn Marian.
Gilson George Monroe Gilson Clark Anna  1851/NY-1936/CA 21 Dec 1847 29 Sep 1906 West Union West Union Son of Oliver Leonard Gilson 1826/VT-1917/Emporia.KS & Mary Jane Smith 1825/NY-1896/Illyria.Twp.  Ch: Franklin Leonard, Harry Baker, Ross D, Roy D, Ella Cummings, Glenn Marian.
Gilson Glenn Gilson Gilson son of Geo Monroe 22 Dec 1889 29 Apr 1896 West Union West Union Son of Geo Monroe Gilson 1847-1906 & Anna Clark 1851-1936.  Little "Glenn"
Gilson Mary Jane Smith Gilson Oliver Leonard 1826/VT-1917/Fay.Co.IA 27 Mar 1825 12 May 1896 West Union West Union Dau of Unknown Smith & Ruth Sweet. Ch; George Monroe.
Gilson Oliver Leonard Gilson Smith Mary Jane 1825-1896 24 Feb 1826 22 Mar 1917 West Union West Union Son of Leonard Gilson 1799/VT-1852/OH & Miriam Baker 1800/VT-1840/OH.  Ch; George Monroe.
Gilson Rose D Gilson Gilson dau of Geo Monroe No date 20 Mar 1882 West Union West Union Dau of Geo Monroe Gilson 1847-1906 & Anna Clark 1851-1936.
Gilson Audrey Jean Newton Gilson Virgil Dale 1923/Oelwein.IA 6 Feb 1927 No date Woodlawn Oelwein Ch; David Lee.
Gilson Beverly J Oelberg Gilson Gary Charles 1939/WestUnion (son of Oliver Wayne Gilson) 9 May 1941 15 Sep 1996 Woodlawn Oelwein Dau of Aulden Albert Oelberg 1912/Lima.IA-1950Fay.Co.IA & Ester J. Krueger 1913/Fay.Co.IA-1985/Fay.Co.IA.  Ch; Timothy, Beverly Jean
Gilson Catherine     4 Jan 1955 No date Woodlawn Oelwein  
Gilson David Lee Gilson Gilson son of Virgil Dale 11 Apr 1953 11 Apr 1953 Woodlawn Oelwein Son of Virgil Dale Gilson 1923/Oelwien.IA & Audrey Jean Newon 1927/Fay.Co.IA(?).
Gilson Melissa Ann Gilson Gilson dau of Dennis 25 Mar 1983 25 Mar 1983 Woodlawn Oelwein Dau of Dennis Gilson & Lynn Arndorfer (need parents of Dennis Gilson?
Gilson Minnie Mary Warnke Gilson Vern Monroe 1900/Fay.Co.IA-1981 10 Nov 1905 6 Sep 1980 Woodlawn Oelwein Dau of Ernest  Warnke & Rosie Stahr.
Gilson Vern Monroe Gilson   21 Sep 1900 9 Mar 1981 Woodlawn Oelwein Son of Benjiman F & Cora B (RUDDELSDIN) GILSON
Gilson Virgil Dale Gilson Newton Audrey Jean 1927/Fay.Co.IA? 15 Dec 1923 No date Woodlawn Oelwein Son of Vern Monroe Gilson 1900/Fay.Co.IA-1981/Oelwein.IA & Minnie May Warnke 1905/Fay.Co.IA-1980/Oelwein.IA.  Ch; David Lee.

 


Gilson
Basic descendent trees of the major surname lines in Fayette Co, Iowa.
I had to re-create trees from online, census, burial info so there will be speculations/best guesses.
These trees can be added too or corrected should anyone want to copy/paste/email info.

Oliver Leonard Gilson line, ran a family creamery (cheese factory and butter) on their dairy farm, NW corner of sec 6 of Illyria.Twp and in sec 31 of Pleasant Valley Townships,  just west of Illyria/Highland village area on the West Union to Elkader ridge road.   He came to Iowa, a master blacksmith and initially set up a major plough shop adjacent to the Grannis Mill in Grannis Hollow in the late 1850's, but also likely was building this farmstead and dairy farm operation at the same time as he was producing cheese by the mid 1860's.

Descendants of William Gilson
1 GILSON, William b: 30 Apr 1572 in Freeing, Kent.Co.England d: 01 Feb 1638/39 in Scituate, Plymouth.Co.MA Note 1: Sep 2010 Gilson last reviewed; Barry Zbornik Hannibal MO iowaz@hotmail.com Note 3: Surname analogs; Gilson, Gillson, Jillson.
.... +UNKNOWN, Frances b: in Kent.Co.England d: 1649 in Scituate, Plymouth.Co.MA
2 GILSON, Joseph b: 17 Apr 1610 in Freeing, Kent.Co.England d: 16 Apr 1676 in Groton, Middlesex.Co.MA Burial: Concord, Middlesex.Co.MA
..... +CAPPER, Mary b: 1641 m: 18 Nov 1660 in Chelmsford, Middlesex.Co.MA Father: Timothy CAPPER Mother: Elizabeth UNKNOWN
3 GILSON, Mary b: 17 Nov 1662 in Chelmsford, Middlesex.Co.MA d: 1731 in Lancaster, Worcestor.Co.MA
...... +GATES, Nathaniel b: 1685 in Marlborough, Middlesex.Co.MA d: 06 Dec 1731 in Stow, Middlesex.Co.MA
3 GILSON, Timothy b: 1664 in Chelmsford, Middlesex.Co.MA d: 14 Jul 1757 in Stow, Middlesex.Co.MA
...... +GATES, Rebecca b: 23 Jul 1679 in Marlborough, Middlesex.Co.MA d: 21 Jan 1754 in Stow, Middlesex.Co.MA
3 [5] GILSON, Joseph b: 08 Jan 1666/67 in Groton, Middlesex.Co.MA d: 20 Aug 1735 in Groton, Middlesex.Co.MA
...... +UNKNOWN, Hepsibah b: Abt. 1670 in Groton, Middlesex.Co.MA d: 1699 in Groton, Middlesex.Co.MA
. 4 GILSON, Joseph b: 1694 in Groton, Middlesex.Co.MA d: 11 Jun 1760 in Groton, Middlesex.Co.MA
....... +SHEDD, Mary Sarah m: 1717 in Groton, Middlesex.co.MA
... 5 GILSON, Mary b: 16 Feb 1718/19 in Groton, Middlesex.Co.MA
... 5 GILSON, Elizabeth b: 11 Feb 1719/20 in Groton, Middlesex.Co.MA d: 1770 in Groton, Middlesex.Co.MA
......... +KEMP, Samuel m: 02 Feb 1735/36 in Andover, Essex.Co.MA
... 5 [1] GILSON, Anne b: 25 Jul 1722 in Groton, Middlesex.Co.MA d: 1768 in Chester, Windsor.Co.MA
......... +TARBEL, Jonathan
... *2nd Husband of [1] GILSON, Anne:
......... +PATCH, Thomas
... 5 GILSON, Sarah b: 27 Sep 1724 in Groton, Middlesex.Co.MA d: 1809
......... +BLOOD, Simon
... 5 GILSON, Joseph b: 01 Dec 1726 in Groton, Middlesex.Co.MA d: Dec 1726 in Groton, Middlesex.Co.MA
... 5 GILSON, Ruth b: 21 Mar 1728/29 in Groton, Middlesex.Co.MA
......... +PIERCE, Jonathan m: 01 Nov 1750 in Groton, Middlesex.co.MA
... 5 GILSON, Jonathan b: 07 Jan 1730/31 in Groton, Middlesex.Co.MA d: 16 Mar 1817 in Putney, Windham.Co.VT
......... +PIERCE, Susannah b: 20 May 1731 in Groton, Middlesex.Co.MA m: 06 Mar 1750/51 in Groton, Middlesex.co.MA
.... 6 GILSON, Solomon b: 1761 in Nottingham West, Hillsborough.Co.NH d: 09 Mar 1841 in Grafton, Windham.Co.VT
.......... +WOOD, Dorothy Dolly b: 27 Oct 1768 in Ispswich, Hillsborough.Co.NH d: 27 Mar 1865 in Grafton, Windham.Co.VT
..... 7 GILSON, Solomon b: in Grafton, Windham.Co.VT
..... 7 GILSON, John b: 1787 in Westmoreland, Cheshire.Co.VT d: 10 Mar 1828 in Grafton, Windham.Co.VT
........... +STEARNS, Lydia
..... 7 GILSON, Polly b: 1793 in Grafton, Windham.Co.VT
..... 7 GILSON, Unknown
.... 6 GILSON, David b: 1762 in Nottingham West, Hillsborough.Co.NH d: 18 Jan 1836
.......... +SHEFFIELD, Abigail m: 23 Aug 1790 in Putney, Windham.co.VT
..... 7 GILSON, Abigail b: in Grafton, Windham.Co.VT
..... 7 GILSON, Alfred b: in Grafton, Windham.Co.VT
..... 7 GILSON, Clark Buford b: in Grafton, Windham.Co.VT
..... 7 GILSON, Joseph b: in Grafton, Windham.Co.VT
..... 7 GILSON, Orpha b: in Grafton, Windham.Co.VT
..... 7 GILSON, Polly b: in Grafton, Windham.Co.VT
..... 7 GILSON, Poncillia Permillia b: in Grafton, Windham.Co.VT
..... 7 GILSON, David b: 19 Sep 1797 in Grafton, Windham.Co.VT d: 03 Feb 1851 in Grafton, Windham.Co.VT
........... +LAMPHEAR, Deborah Martin b: 1803 in VT m: in VT
..... 7 GILSON, Jonathan b: 19 Sep 1787 in Grafton, Windham.Co.VT d: 1836 in Grafton, Windham.Co.VT
..... 7 GILSON, Daniel b: 24 Feb 1800 in Grafton, Windham.Co.VT
.... 6 GILSON, Susannah b: 28 Jun 1763 in Nottingham West, Hillsborough.Co.NH
.......... +WALTON, Rufus m: 27 Mar 1785 in Putney, Windham.co.VT
.... 6 [2] GILSON, Samuel b: 1765 d: 20 Apr 1824 in Burns, Alegheny.Co.NY
.......... +KEYES, Nabby
.... *2nd Wife of [2] GILSON, Samuel:
.......... +SHIPPGREE, Rhoda b: 1760 d: 1847 m: 10 Mar 1792
.... 6 GILSON, Jonathan b: 1769 in Putney, Windham.Co.VT d: 1843
.......... +GILSON, Sarah b: 13 Feb 1774 in Westminister, Windham.Co.VT d: 21 Oct 1852 in Westminister, Windham.Co.VT
..... 7 GILSON, John b: 1790 in Putney, Windham.Co.VT
..... 7 GILSON, Leonard b: 08 May 1795 in Putney, Windham.Co.VT d: 24 Oct 1869 in East Burke, Caledonia.Co.VT
........... +BRIGHAM, Abagail M. b: 1798 in St. Johnsbury, Caledonia.Co.VT m: 07 Jan 1820 in St. Johnsbury, Caledonia.Co.VT
....... 8 GILSON, Daniel Brigham b: 18 Jul 1828 in St. Johnsbury, Caledonia.Co.VT d: 08 Apr 1913 in East Burke, Caledonia.Co.VT
..... 7 GILSON, Abagail b: 30 Dec 1798 in St. Johnsbury, Caledonia.Co.VT
..... 7 GILSON, Abel b: 13 Apr 1803 in St. Johnsbury, Caledonia.Co.VT
.... 6 GILSON, Oliver b: 1771 in Putney, Windham.Co.VT d: 03 Aug 1843 in Grafton, Windham.Co.VT
.......... +LEONARD, Mary Polly Lenard b: 1769 in Southbourough, Middlesex.Co.MA d: 20 Aug 1853 in Grafton, Windham.Co.VT m: 20 Jun 1797 in Putney, Windham.co.VT
..... 7 [4] GILSON, Leonard b: 15 Apr 1799 in Putney, Windham.Co.VT d: 25 Feb 1852 in Auburn Corners, Geauga.Co.OH Note 8: 1836 Rutland.Co.VT farm Geaiga.Co.OH.
........... +BAKER, Miriam b: 27 Apr 1800 in Danby, Putney.Co.VT d: 25 Feb 1840 in Auburn Corners, Geauga.Co.OH m: 1824 in VT Father: Unknown BAKER
....... 8 GILSON, Oliver Leonard b: 24 Feb 1826 in Middletown, Middlesex.Co.VT d: 22 Mar 1917 in Hm of g/son Frank in Emporia, Lyon.Co.KS Burial: West Union Cem, Fay.Co.IA Note 4: Abt. 1837 VT>MI 1837; MI>OH 1838; OH>Fay.Co.IA May 1853. Note 5: 1850 Census; blacksmith, bro Willard & S.A.75yF/NY, with, Auburn.Twp, Geauga.Co.OH Note 6: Bet. 1853 - 1854 OH to Pine Run, Genesee.Co.MI; with Chas Stafford family. Note 7: May 1854 MI to farm in NW corner of Illyria.Twp, Fay.Co.IA. Note 8: 1856 Census; farming, NW corner, Illyria.Twp, Fay.Co.IA; Geo Johnson family with. Note 9: Abt. 1857 Bro Willard handling farm while Oliver set up blacksmith shop at Grannis Mill, sec 31, Illyria.Twp Note 12: 1860 Census; Plough Maker, $6k/2500, sec 31, Illyria.Twp, Fay.Co.IA Note 13: 1860 Plough shop adj to Alonzo B. Grannis Mill in Grannis Hollow. Note 14: 1860 Census; Caroline Johnson & ch still with. Note 15: Abt. 1864 Left plough shop to Grannis; set up creamery/cheese, sec 6,Illyria.Twp. Note 17: 1870 Census; farming (creamery,cheese plant) $7500/1894, sec 6, Illyria.Twp, Fay.Co.IA. Note 18: 1870 Raising nephew Charles Draper1858/IA. Note 19: 1877 1066#butter, 6674#cheese, ave $50/cow (1st cheese factory in area). Note 20: 1878 Hist; stock raiser & Home Dairy, Oliver & son Geo, cheese from 20-25 cows, butter in cold months. Note 21: 1878 Stock raiser with son Geo on 275a, sec 6, llyria.Twp, P.O. West Union & Brainard. Note 22: 1880 Census; farming & creamery with son Geo, sec 6, Illyrial.Twp, Fay.Co.IA. Note 24: 1884 IA Gaz; proprietor, creamery, 6m E of West Union in sec 6, Illyria.Twp, Fay.Co.IA. Note 25: Farm W of Illyria/Highland known as Gilson farm/place. Note 26: 1900 Census; with son Geo, Wadena village, Illyria.Twp, Fay.Co.IA. Note 27: 1901 Gilson Creamery still operated by Geo; Oliver gardening & fruit trees. Note 28: Bet. 1902 - 1903 Retired into West Union village. Note 29: Oibt; known as rugged, forceful, honest, sturdy of pioneer type.
............. +SMITH, Mary Jane b: 27 Mar 1825 in Milton, Saratoga.Co.NY d: 12 Mar 1896 in Sec 6, Illyria.Twp, Fay.Co.IA Burial: West Union Cem, Fay.Co.IA m: 26 Nov 1845 in Auburn Corners, Geauga.Co.OH Father: Unknown SMITH Mother: Ruth SWEET
........ 9 GILSON, George Monroe b: 21 Dec 1847 in Auburn Corners, Geauga.Co.OH d: 29 Sep 1906 in West Union, Fay.Co.IA Burial: West Union Cem, Fay.Co.IA Note 5: 1854 OH with parents to sec 6 farm, Illyria.Twp, Fay.Co.IA. Note 8: Bet. 1871 - 1902 Would continue on with Gilson farm, creamery, cheese factory. Note 10: 1878 Stock raiser with father on 275a, sec 6, llyria.Twp, P.O. West Union. Note 11: 1878 Hist; the Home Dairy, Oliver & son Geo, cheese from 20 cows, butter in cold months. Note 12: 1880 Census; farming & creamery with father, sec 6, Illyrial.Twp, Fay.Co.IA. Note 14: 1885 Census; farming/creamery with father, Illyria.Twp, Fay.Co.IA. Note 17: 1895 Census; running farm/creamery, parents living with. Note 20: 1900 Census; farming, Wadena village, Illyria.Twp, Fay.Co.IA. Note 21: 1900 With; Anna1851, Franlkin1875, Harry1880, Ella1885, father Oliver. Note 27: Bet. 1902 - 1903 Moved from Gilson farm into West Union, IA. Note 28: Bet. 1904 - 1905 Bought West Union grist/feed mill to run with son Harry.
.............. +CLARK, Anna Marie Mary b: 06 Dec 1851 in Fly Creek, Otsego.Co.NY d: 28 Jan 1936 in Glendale.CA m: 18 Oct 1871 in Fay.Co.IA Father: Issac Franklin CLARK Mother: Adah Livona CUMMINGS
......... 10 GILSON, Franklin Leonard b: 21 Mar 1875 in Sec 6 farm, Illyria.Twp, Fay.Co.IA d: Jan 1946 in Rochester, MN Note 11: 1900 Census; Illyria.Twp, Fay.Co.IA Note 12: 1906 Iiving at Winfield, KS Note 16: 1925 Census; teacher K.St.Teacher's College, Emporia, Lyon.Co.KS Note 17: 1925 Six ch in sch, H.S., or col; boarding 6 col students.
............... +PURDY, Lulu Edna b: 1880 in KS m: 06 Jun 1906 in Winfield, Cowley.Co.KS
........... 11 GILSON, Marjorie b: 1908 in KS
........... 11 GILSON, Meriam b: 1910 in KS
........... 11 GILSON, Teresa b: 1912 in KS
........... 11 GILSON, Gareth b: 1916 in KS
........... 11 GILSON, Geossrey b: 1916 in KS
........... 11 GILSON, Leonard b: 1921 in KS
......... 10 GILSON, Harry Baker b: 27 Aug 1880 in Sec 6 farm, Illyria.Twp, Fay.Co.IA d: 12 Oct 1963 in West Union hosp, Fay.Co.IA Burial: Illyria Cem, Illyria.Twp, Fay.Co.IA. Note 7: Attended Illyria/Highland country schools. Note 9: Graduated West Union H.S. when parents moved into West Union. Note 10: Worked at a sorghum mill (Wadean?). Note 11: 1905 Father bought West Union Feed Mill; Harry operated. Note 12: Had a plumbing & heating buisness. Note 13: Worked for Johnson & Son in West Union. Note 17: 1917 Farming Illyria/Highland area, Fay.Co.IA.
............... +SHAFFER, Mabel Mae b: 25 Jul 1880 in Fay.Co.IA d: 02 Jan 1962 in Postville hosp, Allamakee.Co.IA Burial: Illyria Cem, Illyria.Twp, Fay.Co.IA. m: 27 Aug 1902 in John Shaffer farm, Highland.Twp, Clayton.Co.IA Father: John D. SHAFFER Mother: Susan C. ROBBINS
........... 11 GILSON, Donald Franklin b: 18 Apr 1903 in West Union area, Fay.Co.IA d: 27 Mar 1963 in Postville hosp, Allamakee.Co.IA Burial: Elgin Cem, sec 4, lot 52, Fay.Co.IA. Note 6: Attended sch in Neb, Clermont, Highland.Twp in Clayton.Co & Elgin. Note 7: 1923 Graduated Elgin.IA H.S; attended Oelwein Bus.Col. 1 yr. Note 9: Worked for Central States Power & Light after marriage. Note 11: Worked Capper's Hatchery in Elgin for 30yrs.
................. +OLSON, Agnes Beatrice b: 25 Sep 1904 in Decorah, Winneshiek.Co.IA d: 26 Jan 1999 in Postville, Allamakee.Co.IA Burial: Elgin Cem, sec 4, lot 52, Fay.Co.IA. m: 22 Sep 1930 in Luth. parsonage, Caledonia.MN Father: Julius OLSON
............ 12 GILSON, Lauretta Mae
.................. +SCHULTZ, Willis
............ 12 GILSON, Durwin
............ 12 GILSON, Curtis Note 8: Graduated Valley H.S. Clermont/Elgin.IA. Note 11: Lived in Elgin after marriage; worked for Torkelson Trench & Pipe Co.
.................. +PECK, Dorothy m: 04 Oct 1964 Father: Kenneth HELLUM Mother: Viola R. PECK Note 6: Graduated Postville.IA H.S. & Allen Mem. Sch. of Nursing in Waterloo. Note 8: Lived ini Elgin after marraite, worked at Palmer Hosp in West Union.
............. 13 GILSON, Rodney Note 8: 1986 Graduated Valley H.S. Clermont/Elgin, IA.
................... +YOUNGBLOOD, Melody m: 26 Apr 1997 in Eldorado Luth, Fay.Co.IA Father: Marvin YOUNGBLOOD Mother: Lana UNKNOWN Note 9: 1994 Graduated N.Fay H.S. West Union.IA.
........... 11 GILSON, Dorothy Shaffer b: 23 Mar 1905 in West Union, Fay.Co.IA Note 11: 1925 Census; lodging with Albert Gilson (son of Richaret) in Oelwein.IA. Note 12: 1925 Indicates connection between Oelwein & Illyria.Twp Gilson's.
................. +FREDERICH, William Gerald m: 02 Jul 1927
........... 11 GILSON, George Monroe b: 04 Aug 1906 in West Union, Fay.Co.IA
................. +WARREN, Dorothy m: 02 Jun 1931
............ 12 GILSON, Warren
............ 12 GILSON, Elizabeth
........... 11 GILSON, Oliver Wayne b: 27 Aug 1915 in Elgin, P.Val.Twp, Fay.Co.IA d: 16 May 1997 in Elgin, P.Val.Twp, Fay.Co.IA Burial: Elgin Cem, sec 5, lot 117, P.Val.Twp, Fay.Co.IA. Note 6: 1933 Graduated from Elgin.HS, then attended UIU one year. Note 9: Worked; Capper Hatcher, farmed 9y, Clermont Farmers Coop 11y. Note 13: 1979 Retired from Hy-Grade Foods in Elgin.
................. +WENGER, Corinne Marion b: 09 Mar 1921 in Elgin area, Fay.Co.IA Burial: Elgin cem, sec 5, lot 117, P.Val.Twp, Fay.Co.IA. m: 02 Dec 1937 in Waukon, Alamakee.Co.IA Father: Charles WENGER Mother: Margaret COOK
............ 12 GILSON, Gary Charles b: 04 May 1939 in West Union, Fay.Co.IA
.................. +OELBERG, Beverly J. b: 09 May 1941 in West Union, Fay.Co.IA d: 15 Sep 1996 in Oelwein, Fay.Co.IA Burial: Woodlawn Cem, Oelwein, IA. m: 24 Apr 1960 in Elgin, Fay.Co.IA Father: Aulden Alden Albert OELBERG Mother: Ester Esther J. KRUEGER Note 8: 1959 Graduated Valley H.S., Elgin/Clermont, IA. Note 10: Attended Gates Business College at Waterloo. Note 14: Bef. Jan 1996 Bookkeeper & office manager, Oelwein Daily Reg, 19yrs.
............. 13 GILSON, Timothy
................... +CATHERINE, Unknown
............. 13 GILSON, Becky Jean b: 11 Sep 1976
................... +BATTERSON, Brian James
............ 12 GILSON, Karen b: 12 Mar 1942 in West Union, Fay.Co.IA
.................. +ELLIS, Ken Eugene m: 12 Jun 1960 in Fay.Co.IA
............ 12 [3] GILSON, David Wayne b: 30 Jan 1949 in Postville, Allamakee.Co.IA
.................. +DAVID, Cherly m: 19 Apr 1975 in Elkader, Clayton.Co.IA
............ *2nd Wife of [3] GILSON, David Wayne:
.................. +JANES, Lynn m: 12 Oct 1984
......... 10 GILSON, Ross D. b: 02 Mar 1882 in Sec 6 farm, Illyria.Twp, Fay.Co.IA d: 02 Mar 1882 in Sec 6 farm, Illyria.Twp, Fay.Co.IA Burial: West Union Cem, Fay.Co.IA
......... 10 GILSON, Roy D. b: 02 Mar 1882 in Sec 6 farm, Illyria.Twp, Fay.Co.IA d: 20 Mar 1882 in Sec 6 farm, Illyria.Twp, Fay.Co.IA
......... 10 GILSON, Ella Cummings b: 17 Sep 1885 in Sec 6 farm, Illyria.Twp, Fay.Co.IA d: in Calif Note 9: Taught school at West Union before marriage. Note 11: 1906 Living at Ashland, KS. Note 14: 1917 Living at Cunningham, KS.
............... +WELLS, William Ambrose m: 07 Jul 1909 in Winfield, Cowley.Co.KS Note 8: M.E. minister. in Winfield.KS at time of marriage. Note 11: Missionary work in Africa; family included.
........... 11 WELLS, Clayton Burgess b: 25 Aug 1912 in Singapore, Strait Settlements
........... 11 WELLS, Roland Gilson b: 28 Feb 1914 in Singapore, Strait Settlements
........... 11 WELLS, John Munroe b: 16 Apr 1916 in Winfield, Cowley.Co.KS
........... 11 WELLS, William Ambrose b: 03 Sep 1923 in Arkansas City, KS
......... 10 GILSON, Glenn Marian b: 22 Dec 1889 in Sec 6 farm, Illyria.Twp, Fay.Co.IA d: 29 Apr 1896 in West Union Cem, Fay.Co.IA Burial: West Union Cem, Fay.Co.IA
....... 8 GILSON, Willard Baker b: 30 Apr 1829 in Middletown, Middlesex.Co.VT d: 1877 in Auburn Corners, Geauga.Co.OH Note 6: 1850 Census; blacksmith, single, with bro Oliver, Auburn.Twp, Geauga.Co.OH Note 9: Abt. 1858 Suspect came to IA to handle bro Oliver's farm while he set up plough shop. Note 11: 1860 Census; farming, suspect sec 6, Illyria.Twp, Fay.Co.IA for bro Oliver. Note 12: 1860 Oliver had set up & was running plough factory/shop at Grannis Hollow. Note 15: Abt. 1864 Suspect returned to Hiram.Twp, Portage.Co.OH. Note 18: 1870 Census; farming, Hiram.Twp, Portage.Co.OH Note 21: Moved back to OH.
............. +LINES, Lucy Ann b: 1833 in Penn d: 1884 in Auburn Corners, Geauga.Co.OH m: Abt. 1855 in Auburn Corners, Geauga.Co.OH
........ 9 GILSON, Leroy L. b: 1856 in OH Burial: Sioux St. Marie, MI Note 11: Traveling missonary.
........ 9 GILSON, Laura M. b: 1859 in Sec 6, Illyria.Twp, Fay.Co.IA d: 09 Jun 1887
.............. +MARBEL, Orrin
........ 9 GILSON, Alice N. b: 1867 in Hiram.Twp, Portage.Co.OH d: 1948 in Auburn Corners, Geauga.Co.OH Burial: Auburn Corners, Geauga.Co.OH
.............. +MYERS, George L.
........ 9 GILSON, Mary J. b: 1869 in Hiram.Twp, Portage.Co.OH d: in OH Burial: Plymouth, MI Note 8: Living in Michigan.
.............. +WICKS, Clarence
........ 9 GILSON, Emma E. b: 1870 in IA or OH d: in OH
.............. +MORRIS, W. F.
........ 9 GILSON, Twin Boy b: in IA or OH d: in OH, age 5w.
........ 9 GILSON, Twin Girl b: in IA or OH d: in OH, age 5w.
....... 8 GILSON, Sarah Ann b: 04 Jan 1835 in Pawlet, Rutland.Co.VT d: 04 May 1917 in Iowa? Note 6: 1856 Census; with bro Oliver's fam, NW corner, Illyria.Twp, Fay.Co.IA
............. +DRAPER, Samuel d: in Iowa m: Apr 1858
........ 9 DRAPER, Charles I. b: 1858 in Fay.Co.IA Note 11: Aft. 1860 Raised by uncle Oliver Gilson, farm/creamery, sec 6, Illyria.Twp, Fay.Co.IA Note 14: Lived at Quimby, Cherokee.Co.IA
.............. +LUCAS, Edna b: in Fayette area, Fay.Co.IA
....... 8 GILSON, Jullette M. b: 08 Aug 1830 in Tinmouth, Rutland.Co.VT d: 10 Sep 1836 in Auburn Corners, Geauga.Co.OH
..... *2nd Wife of [4] GILSON, Leonard:
........... +HARRIS, Sarah m: 16 Jun 1841 in Auburn Corners, Geauga.Co.OH Note 4: Surname at Gilson marriage may be Goodwin or Gooding.
....... 8 GILSON, Ashley Leonard b: Abt. 1842 in Auburn Corners, Geauga.Co.OH d: Abt. 1887 in Osburn area, KS Burial: Osborne, KS. Note 11: 1931 Living with wife in Fairfield.ID Note 12: Aft. 1931 Lived with son Walter in Osborne.KS.
............. +UNKNOWN b: Abt. 1842 d: Aug 1931 in Fairfield.ID Burial: Osborne, KS.
........ 9 GILSON, Walter
......... 10 GILSON, Rena Note 11: 1831 Lived near Osborne, KS.
......... 10 GILSON, Lena Note 11: 1931 Lived near Osborne, KS.
..... 7 GILSON, Holland b: 04 Dec 1800 in Putney, Windham.Co.VT d: 30 Jul 1880 in Kalamazoo. MI Burial: Gilson Cem in Mich Note 6: 1834 Went to MI with uncle Solomon Gilson.
........... +BECKWITH, Mehitable m: 15 Oct 1826
..... 7 GILSON, Willard b: 26 Jul 1803 in Windham.Co.VT d: 03 Jun 1848 in Windham.Co.VT
........... +BLODGETT, Elnora b: Oct 1810 in VT d: 19 Jul 1860 in Windham.Co.VT m: 01 Jan 1834 in Windham.Co.VT
....... 8 GILSON, Willard
....... 8 GILSON, Ann
............. +TAYLOR, Unknown
..... 7 GILSON, Hollis b: 12 Jul 1805 in Windham.Co.VT d: 1851 in Kalamazoo. MI
..... 7 GILSON, Anna S. b: 1807 in Windham.Co.VT d: 1889
........... +CHRISTIE, William C. m: 07 Dec 1834 in Windham.Co.VT
..... 7 GILSON, Laura M. b: 1808 in Windham.Co.VT d: 1895
........... +PARK, Issac m: 24 May 1833
..... 7 GILSON, Harriet b: 1810 in Windham.Co.VT d: 1849
........... +DIVOLL, Phineas m: 02 Dec 1840 in Windham.Co.VT
..... 7 GILSON, Horace Dana b: 04 Jun 1817 in Windham.Co.VT
... 5 GILSON, Daniel b: 28 Mar 1736 in Groton, Middlesex.Co.MA d: 13 Jan 1779 in Schenectady.Co.NY
......... +KENT, Alphia b: 1731 in Groton, Middlesex.Co.MA
. 4 GILSON, Anne b: 22 Oct 1690 in Groton, Middlesex.Co.MA d: 21 Apr 1720 in Chemsford, Middlesex.Co.MA
....... +CHAMBERLAIN, Samuel b: 28 Oct 1685 in Chemsford, Middlesex.Co.MA d: 06 Jun 1769 in Westford, Middlesex.Co.MA
. 4 GILSON, Eleaser b: 1694 in Groton, Middlesex.Co.MA d: 16 Feb 1754 in Groton, Middlesex.Co.MA
....... +FARWELL, Hannah b: 06 May 1701 in Groton, Middlesex.Co.MA d: 11 May 1762 in Groton, Middlesex.Co.MA
. 4 GILSON, Jeremiah b: 10 Jan 1695/96 in Groton, Middlesex.Co.MA
. 4 GILSON, Sarah b: 25 Dec 1698 in Groton, Middlesex.Co.MA
*2nd Wife of [5] GILSON, Joseph:
...... +LAWRENCE, Elizabeth b: 06 Jul 1674 in Groton, Middlesex.Co.MA
. 4 GILSON, Elizabeth b: 1699 in Groton, Middlesex.Co.MA d: 04 Dec 1770 in Groton, Middlesex.Co.MA
....... +MOORS, Abraham b: 1693 in England d: Mar 1780 in Groton, Middlesex.Co.MA
. 4 GILSON, Jonas b: May 1701 in Groton, Middlesex.Co.MA d: 20 Oct 1739 in Lunenburg, Worcester.Co.MA
....... +GOODRIDGE, Hannah b: 25 Apr 1706 in Newbury, Essex.Co.MA
. 4 GILSON, Mary b: 08 Feb 1702/03 in Groton, Middlesex.Co.MA d: in Groton, Middlesex.Co.MA
. 4 GILSON, Eunice b: 12 Jan 1705/06 in Groton, Middlesex.Co.MA d: 10 Apr 1774 in Harvard, Worcester.Co.MA
....... +SPRAGUE, Ebenezer b: 06 Nov 1701 in Malden, Middlesex.Co.Ma d: 1756 in Worcester.Co.MA
. 4 GILSON, Isaac b: 05 Sep 1707 in Groton, Middlesex.Co.MA d: 20 Oct 1739 in Groton, Middlesex.Co.MA
....... +KEMP, Dorothy
3 GILSON, Sarah b: 25 Jun 1669 in Groton, Middlesex.Co.MA
...... +KEMP, Jonathan b: 06 Apr 1668 in Groton, Middlesex.Co.MA
3 GILSON, Anna b: 22 Feb 1669/70 in Groton, Middlesex.Co.MA
3 GILSON, John b: 23 Feb 1673/74 in Groton, Middlesex.Co.MA d: 10 Sep 1707 in Groton, Middlesex.Co.MA
...... +BLOOD, Sarah b: 17 Feb 1674/75 in Groton, Middlesex.Co.MA d: 03 Sep 1759 in Middlesex.Co.MA

 

      

 



James Henry Gilson line
of Hazleton.Twp, Buchanan.Co.IA & Jefferson.Twp, Fayette.Co.IA

The James Henry Gilson line farmed in the Hazelton area of Buchanan Co, Iowa, and associated with the Oelwein area of Fayette Co, Iowa.   A connection between the James Henry Gilson line and the Oliver Gilson line back in Ohio is likely, but was not found.

Descendants of Richard Gilson
1 GILSON, Richard b: 1813 in Ohio? Note 1: Sep 2010 Gilson last reviewed; Barry Zbornik Hannibal MO iowaz@hotmail.com Note 6: 1850 Census; farming, Paris.Twp, Stark.Co.OH Note 8: 1860 Census; farming, Fairmound P.O., North.Twp, Marshall.Co.IN
.. +UNKNOWN, Jane b: 1821 in Penn
2 GILSON, John b: 1839 in OH Note 8: 1860 Census; apprentice cooper, with parents, N.Twp, Marshall.Co.IN
2 GILSON, William b: 1840 in OH
2 GILSON, Elizabeth b: 1841 in OH d: Bet. 1851 - 1859 in OH
2 GILSON, Thomas b: 1844 in OH
2 GILSON, Hannah b: 1846 in Paris.Twp, Stark.Co.OH
2 GILSON, Alexander b: 1847 in Paris.Twp, Stark.Co.OH
2 GILSON, James Henry b: 16 Jun 1848 in Paris.Twp, Stark.Co.OH d: 26 Feb 1928 in Buchanan.Co.IA Burial: Otsego Cem, lot 91, Jefferson.Twp, Fay.Co.IA Note 6: 1870 Census; teamster, Plymouth P.O., Center.Twp, Marshall.Co.IN Note 8: 1880 Census; farming, Buffalo.Twp, Buchanan.Co.IA Note 14: 1895 Census; farming, Hazelton area, Buchanan.Co.IA. Note 15: 1900 Census; farming, Hazelton.Twp, Buchanan.Co.IA. Note 18: 1920 Census; with wife, Ward 2, Independence, Buchanan.Co.IA.
... +HOPPES, Emmaline Emmeline b: Sep 1846 in PA d: 1928 in Buchanan.Co.IA Burial: Otsego Cem, lot 91, Jefferson.Twp, Fay.Co.IA m: 05 Dec 1869 in Center.Twp, Marshall.Co.IN
3 GILSON, Clara Clary M. b: 1869 in Center.Twp, Marshall.Co.IN d: 1886 in Buchanan.Co.IA Burial: Otsego Cem, lot 91, Jefferson.Twp, Fay.Co.IA Note 11: Age at death, 17y11m2d.
3 GILSON, Sarah J. b: Oct 1870 in Center.Twp, Marshall.Co.IN Note 11: 1900 Census; widowed, dau Chloe, with parents, Hazleton.Twp, Buchanan.Co.Ia.
.... +WHITESELL, Unknown d: Bef. 1900 in Buchanan.Co.IA
. 4 WHITESELL, Chloe b: May 1898 in Buchanan.Co.IA
3 GILSON, Benjamin F. b: 1873 in Center.Twp, Marshall.Co.IN
.... +RUDDELSDIN, Cora B.
. 4 GILSON, Vern Monroe b: 21 Sep 1900 in Fay.Co.IA? d: 09 Mar 1981 in Mercy Hops, Oewlein, Fay.Co.IA Burial: Woodlawn Cem, Oelwein, Fay.Co.IA. Note 19: Retired as blacksmith with Chi. Gr. Western RR. Note 21: Lived 522 1st St NW, Oelwein.IA.
..... +WARNKE, Minnie Mary b: 10 Nov 1905 in Fay.Co.IA d: 06 Sep 1980 in Oelwein, Fay.Co.IA Burial: Woodlawn Cem, Oelwein, Fay.Co.IA. Father: Ernest WARNKE Mother: Rosie Rose STAHR
... 5 GILSON, Virgil Dale b: 15 Dec 1923 in Oelwein, Fay.Co.IA Burial: Woodlawn Cem, Oelwein, Fay.Co.IA.
....... +NEWTON, Audrey Jean b: 06 Feb 1927 in Fay.Co.IA? Burial: Woodlawn Cem, Oelwein, Fay.Co.IA. m: in Fay.Co.IA
.... 6 GILSON, David Lee b: 11 Apr 1953 in Oelwein, Fay.Co.IA d: 11 Apr 1953 in Oelwein, Fay.Co.IA Burial: Woodlawn Cem, Oelwein, Fay.Co.IA.
... 5 GILSON, Mildred Note 7: 1981 Living at Oran, Fay.Co.IA.
....... +CUMMINGS, Clarence
... 5 GILSON, Clarence
. 4 GILSON, Leslie Note 11: 1981 Living at White Bear Lake, MN
3 GILSON, Cerilda b: 1877 in Center.Twp, Marshall.Co.IN
3 GILSON, Henry James b: 1880 in Buffalo.Twp, Buchanan.Co.IA Note 11: 1925 Census; farming, Wash.Twp, Buchanan.Co.IA, parents with.
.... +WARDELL, Ella b: 1882 in Iowa Father: H. WARDELL Mother: Amanda HARRIER
3 GILSON, John Ross b: 1883 in Buffalo.Twp, Buchanan.Co.IA d: 10 Jan 1977 in Buchanan.Co.IA Burial: Fontana Cem, add 3, lot 184, Hazleton, Buchanan.Co.IA Note 8: 1910 Census; farming, with parents, Hazleton.Twp, Fay.Co.IA. Note 11: 1925 Census; farming, Oran.Twp, Fay.Co.IA.
.... +ALLEN, Agnes b: 1892 in Iowa Father: J. C. ALLEN Mother: Mary KING
. 4 GILSON, Bessie b: 1914 in Fay.Co.IA d: 1975 Burial: Fontana Cem, add 3, lot 184, Hazleton, Buchanan.Co.IA
..... +HOLST, Thorvald E. b: 1912 m: 24 Mar 1935
. 4 GILSON, Howard b: 28 Feb 1921 in Fay.Co.IA d: 18 Jul 1992 Burial: Floral Hills Mem. Gardens, Oelwein, Fay.Co.IA.
..... +UNKNOWN, Muriel
3 GILSON, Adam L. b: 10 Apr 1885 in Buchanan.Co.IA d: 03 May 1909 in Buchanan.Co.IA Burial: Otsego Cem, lot 91, Jefferson.Twp, Fay.Co.IA



Oliver Leonard Gilson Farm, Creamery, Cheese Factory, Plough Shop


Grannis mill and Gilson farm/creamery locations.
 MSR Maps http://msrmaps.com/Default.aspx and Google Earth can be used for topo and aerial views.


1990's aerial view of the Oliver and George Gilson pioneer farm in Fayette Co, Iowa
 MSR Maps http://msrmaps.com/Default.aspx and Google Earth can be used for topo and aerial views.

...While working on the history of the Grannis family, merchants in Fayette village and traction mill operators in Grannis Hollow, it was observed in the 1860 census, Oliver Gilson was listed as a plough maker with a major tax base ($6k/$2500) for the time and was living adjacent to Alonzo Grannis in sec 31 of Illyria.Twp or at the Grannis Mill. 
...That did not add up as I knew in 1856 that Oliver was farming in sec 6, Illyria.Twp & sec 31, P.Val.Twp.  Oliver continued to operate at that farm location with his son George for the rest of his working life.  I started speculating and processing what was going on in Grannis Hollow during the mid 1850's to abt 1900.  
...The Grannis Mill (steam traction sawmill) was in operation by 1856/57.  It was powered by a steam traction engine transported in pieces by oxen from Mississippi River ports then reassembled.  Experienced smiths/mechanics were needed to set up and run traction engines.  Often blacksmith and plough (tool) shops were set up near traction steam mills and used line power to operate early hammer, grinding, stamping machinery.  Machinery coming in with  the steam engines may have been used to set up a Grannis Hollow plough shop.  There was Pleasant Ridge trail neighborhood developing about the same time, with  a blacksmith shop, school, just a mile plus up the hills to the SE of Grannis Hollow.
...Information on the Grannis family and mill will be on a Grannis page. 

...Oliver Gilson apparently had his brother Willard Gilson come from Ohio to help operate and improve (clear & break ground) the Illrya/P.Val farm.  Or just to handle the farm while Oliver was concentrating on setting up a plough shop in Grannis Hollow.  Willard would return to Ohio within about ten years. 
...Oliver and Willard where blacksmiths and manufacturers of tools, so one can assume both Oliver and Willard were involved with the plough shop in Grannis Hollow and moving back and forth between the new farm. 
...It appears the Grannis family may have wanted to set up and operate a blacksmith and plough shop at the Grannis Mill site.
...Oliver was back on the farm within a few years with the Grannis Mill area continuing to function into the early 1900's.
...The blacksmith/plough shop apparently continued to be  operated by other smiths for at least a couple of decades.  Alonzo Grannis is listed in the 1870 census as a manufacturer thus probably involved with some type of smithing and tool makinig while still operating the Grannis Mill. 
...One could assume the Gilson's traveled back/forth from farm to Grannis Hollow, however Oliver is listed as a plough maker in Grannis Hollow in 1860 and Willard on the farm in Illyria.Twp.  Early plough shops manufactured many types of tools, much as in the early Cedar Rapids advertisement of July 1857 on this page.  
...By the mid 1860's, Oliver Gilson had a family creamery (cheese factory & butter) operating on his farm, which would required developing pastures, fields, buildings and a dairy herd from the time he arrived in Fayette Co.  Likely much of the lumber/timber for the buildings came out of the Grannis Mill and Plough shop location.
...Oliver and, his coming of age son, George expanded the Illyria/P.Val.Twp farm into a major dairy and cheese making business by the mid 1860's, probably the first such operation in Fayette Co, Iowa.  The farm continued as the Gilson farm and creamery to about 1902, and remained known as the Gilson place for decades after being sold.


Cheese Making

 

              As to the components needed to make cheese and to whether your cheese makers black smith back ground would have helped him adapt to the business, there are few things that would be needed that are iron. Most of what is required would be made of wood, which would not suffer from the acidic conditions of cheese making. If anything, his black smith business would attract customers both to buy his cheese and eventually to purchase milk as his cheese business expanded. I noted the cheese factory lasted quite a while, which was unusual, most cheese factories switched to the production of butter rather quickly after the Philadelphia Centennial Exposition in 1876, when a Delaware county butter maker, John Steward,  won the gold medal for best butter over all during the exposition. Eastern buyers went streaming into the Midwest looking for supplies of this good and cheap butter. Most of the cheese factories closed and turned to making butter instead.

 

Objectives in making cheese
Expel water and soluble compounds from the milk to produce solid curds.
De-mineralize the casein proteins of the curd with bacterial acids and add salt.
Each cheese type has its own target level of water content, acid level and salt content, which affect the microbes growing in the curd/cheese and  impact the ripening/maturation, aroma, texture, flavor.
The objectives are accomplished in eight steps by the cheesemaker or the end cheese type and quality will not be as intended.

Summary of Eight Steps of cheese making:
Step 1—Setting: Bacteria (either already swimming around in the milk or added to it) and rennet enzymes derived from stomach linings of  milk-producing mammals  are added to the milk. The rennet stops the water attraction of casein proteins causing  coagulation into curd.  The other seven steps involve reducing the water or whey content depending on the type of cheese.
Step 2—Cutting: The curd is cut into smaller particles depending on the type of cheese being produced.  Drier cheeses into smaller pieces so more whey drains off, wetter cheeses are left in larger pieces.
Step 3—Cooking:  Depending on the cheese type, curd pieces are heated and stirred which removes more whey.
Step 4—Draining: Draining removes more whey/liquid.
Step 5—Knitting:   As the whey drains off, the curd pieces/particles contact each other more closely and stick into bigger masses.
Step 6—Pressing: Weight or pressure is applied to certain cheeses to squeeze out more way and at the same time five a final shape or mould.
Step 7—Salting:   Salt may be added by sprinkling or rubbing it on the cheese mould or by submerging in a salt brine, which will continue to draw out whey.
Step 8—Special applications:   Depending on the cheese type,  the cheese is aged/matured for a specific time, humidity, temperature and other physical conditions, until presented for sales or transportation.

...Cheese production allowed for the preservation of the nutritional value of milk and increased its economic value.
...Cheese making in colonial and frontier America was almost always at the family level from one, two or several cows, sheep, goats.  The pioneer women were generally skilled in cheese-making in their more eastern homes as the populations spread rapidly westward.  As soon as a log-cabin was up, the family and livestock sheltered and milk available, there would be a pole with one end under the lower log of the cabin, and lying across a rudely constructed cheese-hoop, with a weight attached to the outer end, sufficient to press a hoop of cheese.  When the early settlers had succeeded in enclosing and seeding pastures, cheese-making warm months increased and supplemented butter of the colder months, making  a way of storing dairy product longer as milk quickly spoiled. 
...Cheese was an economically cost-effective means of selling dairy products, as no method existed in the nineteenth century for the long distance transport of fluid milk.
...Butter had to be transported in kegs of salt in which the volume of the sodium preservative was generally greater than that of the marketable product.
...Because fresh milk was so perishable, creameries and cheese factories were located within a few miles of each other in dairy areas. 
...More than 1400 cheese making recipes developed in different pre-industrial cultures to preserve the nutritional value of milk depending on the constraints of  local resources, climate, terrains. 
...In the American farm-dairy period of cheese production, farmers had to make, store, and market their own cheese.  Cheese making often fell on the shoulders of farm women assisted by a male cheese maker.   Cheese had to be made seven days a week, even on Sunday.
...Lumbering and cheese making were often home industries, along with other farming practices.  In hill and timber country, abundant lumber and fuel resources were made available by clear cutting for agriculture for at least a couple of decades or more. Even the spread of mechanization and the centralization of cheese production in factories at the end of the nineteenth century did not immediately eliminate the home and farm cheese making industry. 
...Cheese making before refrigeration was decentralized with the creameries located very close to the dairy herds.  The opening of rail lines in NE Iowa, in the 1870's expedited transport and expanded the market size area for agricultural products.

..In 1833, as a young man Jacob Steiner immigrated from Switzerland to America, settling with his wife in the Ohio valley.  He brought with him an old Swiss copper cheese kettle, and started what may be considered the first cheese factory in America.
...Ohio was much like NE Iowa, forested rolling hills, meadow/pasture and bottom land which encouraged dairy farming.  Jacob became a successful Swiss cheese maker, which encouraged more dairy farmers and cheese makers to populate central and eastern Ohio.  Steiner cheese remains the oldest cheese factory still operating in the U.S.


...About 1862, a notable change started in the manufacture of Ohio cheese and butter.   Farmers/dairymen began sending their milk to creameries and cheese factories that worked on a co-operative system, where at a given price per pound, the co-op took care of the making, curing, boxing, selling or forwarding to market of butter and cheese, with members also taking part in any dividends.
...The great difficulty was often access to a market for butter and/or cheese production.  Early Ohio had a variety of canals, rivers, lakes for water transport, with rails following close behind.
 


Geagua Co, Ohio
...Gilson families were early settlers in Auburn.Twp, Geauga.Co.Ohio, which had a population of: 1820-215, 1830-428, 1840-1198, 1850, 1184, 1860-942, 1870-783.
...Ohio became a major early American cheese producer with Geauga.Co a leader.
...In 1850, the dairy production of Geauga.Co.OH, was:   butter, 424,547 pounds; cheese, 2,273,723 pounds.
...In 1876:  butter, 672,641 pounds; cheese, 4,136,231 pounds. Only three counties in Ohio produced more than Geagua County and they were much larger in size.

...Like blacksmiths, wagon makers and other craftsman good cheese makers became very skilled over time by apprenticing and experience.
...A master cheese maker developed the knowledge and skills to convert milk into cheese by:
1.  Controlling the ingredients.
2.  Controlling the process to make specific types and quality of cheese.


What is cheese?
...All mammal milk contains five basic components:  water, lactose (milk sugar), fat, protein and minerals.
...The protein in milk is found two major groupings called casein and whey.
...Casein protein and fats make up the bulk of the solid part of cheese, both normally  held in suspension by being attracted to water molecules.
...Whey is essentially the  water soluble compounds left after the milk curdles.
...Cheese is the solid curd left and processed after the milk is curdled and a significant amount of the whey (liquid) is drained off.
...Generally the higher the moisture content of a cheese the shorter its shelf life. 
...The origin of each cheese has a history in the environmental and cultural demands of its region, with over 1400 types.


Cheese Making Basics (removing water from milk):
--Natural or starter cultures of bacteria ferment milk in a vat.
--At a correct level of fermentation rennet (enzyme complex from calve stomachs)  is added causing coagulation into curds (solid protein-like complex) & whey (water soluble compounds in milk).
--Whey is drained and/or pressed off.  Curd cut/sliced into appropriate size pieces if needed.
--Curds stirred and packed into moulds.  Salt added/rubbed to preserve and add flavors.
--Fresh/green cheese is released from mold for curing.
--Cured cheese was packed for sales and transport.

Culturing:
In a cheese vat, milk is warmed  to a temperature required to promote the growth of the bacteria that feed on lactose sugar in the milk, which ferments the lactose into lactic acid.  These bacteria in the milk may be wild or added as a specific culture/type.  There are bacteria which produce only lactic acid during fermentation while other types produce lactic acid and other compounds such as carbon dioxide, alcohol, aldehydes, ketones.  Specific types of cheeses get their flavors and appearance from specific bacteria or a combination of bacteria plus the specific way used in handling those cheeses.  Gas formation in certain cheeses produce bubbles such as in Swiss cheese.  Controlled starter culture specific bacteria and fungus can be added to milk in the cheese vat or later for certain types of cheeses while in the cheese curd stage.

Coagulation: 
When sufficient fermentation or lactic acid has been developed, rennet (an enzyme complex generally from processing dried calf stomachs) is added to cause coagulation of  protein-like solids, mainly casein.  As the curd is formed, milk fat is trapped in a casein (protein) matrix.   After adding an amount of rennet, the cheese milk is left to form curds over a period of time controlled by the skills of the cheesemaker and variety wanted. 

Draining:   Once the cheese curd is ready, the cheese whey ( watery, calcium salty liquid of the soluble compounds)  must be removed to ensure better preservation.  The amount and methods of removing whey vary with the type of cheese, as does the method of processing the cheese curd into mature cheese for consumption, sales, transport.  Various kinds of curd presses, moulds, temperature and environmental curd 'handling'  removed liquid controlled by the cheesemaker. 

Cheddar and  numerous hard cheeses: 
For harder textured cheeses, the curd is cut or broken into into small cubes or pieces, and warmed to 102deg F which 'scalds' the curd pieces forcing or squeezing more whey out of the curd.  The curds & whey are moved out of the vat to a draining/screen table where the whey drains off.  The curd is cut into blocks which are stacked, then turned and cut again which encouraged more release of whey.  This processes of scalding, cutting, stacking, cutting is 'cheddering.'  When the cheesemaker thinks the acidity of the curd is right, salt solution is mixed into the ribbons of green curd which arrests acid formation.  Green curd is put into moulds lined with cheese cloth and pressed for a period of time to bind the curds together.  The moulds are removed and the cheese bound in a muslin line cloth or dipped in wax, then stored in a cheese cellar or curing room for maturation or aging.  

Mould-ripening: 
Contrasting to cheddaring is mould ripening, and is a more gentle treatment of the curd. Green curd is transferred to cheese hoops and the whey/liquied is allowed to drain off by gravity.. The cheese curds are then removed from the hoops and dipped into a saturated salt solution.  Salt absorption into the curds stops bacteria growing, as with cheddaring.   For various kinds of non-cheddared cheeses, specific mold spores may be added to the cheese milk.  Or added by dipping the moulded curd into a solution of mold spores or by injection or spraying/splashing on the moulded curd.  The cheesemaker controls the maturation time, temperature, humidity, etc.  Mold spores are very active so moulded cheeses can ripen quickly compared to aging hard or cheddars.  Some ripen from the surface inward, others internally from injected spores.

Quality:  Cheesemakers needed skill in judging the maturation, readiness and quality of their cheeses by sight, smell, taste, texture.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cheesemaker
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rennet
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Whey_protein
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Casein



Ontario Canada cheese factory, 1895.


...S.Hanken, historical archeologist, 8/2012 volunteered some thoughts:
..."The first cheese factories in America were in upstate New York. The Erie Canal was built to supply New York City with food and produce, and that included liquid milk. When the middle men got carried away with their margins, the New York farmers decided to arm twist the market and force the price they would get upward, by switching to the production of cheese and butter, both had longer shelf life than liquid milk. The marketers decided to turn the tables on the New York farmers by flooding the market with cheese from Ohio and pushed Ohio farmers on the frontier at the time, into producing cheese which would supply them money in an otherwise subsistence economy. Being cash strapped when you needed money to pay for land and taxes was always a good incentive for doing something that would make you cash. The New York farmers held out though, in spite of the threat of the Ohio farmers.
...What happened next in Ohio was cheese became cheap protein for slaves in the south, something few people think about when it comes to places like Ohio. So the Ohio cheese makers shipped their products down river for southern plantation owners, rather than to the east coast. There likely was concern at the time that if the south seceded the Ohio cheese and dairy business would suffer, but when the war broke out, commodities for the Army would certainly rescue the farm income generated from its former Southern customers. People are really unaware just how political the dairy business was, when the cheese factories first opened in upstate New York, there was concern for the souls of cheese makers who would have to work on Sunday just as any other day, ministers had to come to grips with do they allow their parishioners to make money which in the end would fill their coffers, or find a way to shut down the whole business to save a few souls. They got over worrying about a few cheese makers souls in a rather quick hurry! |
...Most of what is required would be made of wood, which would not suffer from the acidic conditions of cheese making. If anything, Gilson’s black smith business would attract customers both to buy his cheese and eventually to purchase milk as his cheese business expanded. It was noted the Gilson cheese factory lasted quite a while, which was unusual, most cheese factories switched to the production of butter rather quickly after the Philadelphia Centennial Exposition in 1876, when a Delaware county butter maker, John Steward, won the gold medal for best butter over all during the exposition. Eastern buyers went streaming into the Midwest looking for supplies of this good and cheap butter. Most of the cheese factories closed and turned to making butter instead.

...Regarding cheese manufacture at the farmstead level, it was largely the work of women as was butter production in settlement days. They made small batches through out the milking season trading it to the local general store for the necessities of the family. What we think of today as "pin money" amounted to half the income of the total farm in subsistence days and is an indicator of how important the house wife's role was in these early days.  Secondly, when the production of butter and cheese is turned over to a "factory" system the women are left out of the role of principal handler of the money butter and cheese generated and the cash goes to the dominate male. His idea of what is needed on the farm is often far from what the woman would have invested in. It is often the case creameries and cheese factories are located in close proximity to machinery dealerships and the like to attract the farmers interest in up grading equipment rather than the real needs of the family for clothing and other essentials. The importance women on the farm drops as a result of them losing their control over two major parts of their income stream.
... One of the biggest changes that over took many a small town was the incorporation of a creamery into a community. The cream check or the milk check was a major financial coup for a small town.  Saturday night in the small towns, farmers came in to cash their cream checks and buy their needs with the cash from those checks. The streets would be lined with cars and people walked up and down the side walk visiting and shopping, a true community event.  When cow herds increased in size and the creameries ended, no longer did a farmer get his needs met at the local store, assuming with the loss of farmers, there would even be stores to shop in anyway.
...All of these things have shown us a great amount of change in a very short amount of time, and today's farmers are continuing to change and move on with the times. The huge factory farm operations with thousands of pigs and huge amounts of herbicide being applied to the ground are all things there will be consequences from, whether we will be able to withstand these events is yet to be seen. Having to deal with the effects of genetically modified crops and the potential of something going terribly wrong leaving no way to turn back is also something which could lead to the end of farming as we know it. Only the future holds the facts of the matter, and as historians we can only look back and try and understand our mistakes from the past and try and instruct those in charge of our future to give some quite consideration to what they do and how that may affect us all. "


 

1879 Plat of the Oliver Gilson farm area.

 


Grannis Mill
Grannis Hollow Mill 1906, in operation from 1856/57

The Grannis traction sawmill was initially north or the farmstead area but was moved around through the decades to the mid section of the 'hollow' and to the farmstead area.  Oliver Gilson's involvement in the mill and plough shop after 1860 can only be speculated.  He may have sold out the equipment to Grannis or other smiths or moved some/all to his farm.  The Gilson tax base in 1860 was about double that of both Alonozo and Samuel Grannis in 1870, so Oliver owned a lot of smithing equipment and property in 1860.  Since Alonzo Grannis is listed as a manufacturer in the 1870 census he may have been operating the plow shop.  His brother Samuel is listed as a sawyer with part ownership in 1870. The rails would not come up-steam or westward along the Volga River valley until later in the 1870's so being listed as a manufacturer for just wood products is questionable as mill operators were listed millers and/or sawyers.  Early in 1870, Alonzo Grannis went west for the rest of his life and Samuel took over the Grannis Mill.  Samuel would move from the milling operation in the early 1880's, back to the mercantile and grocery business.  The Grannis Mill changed hands but operated as a steam traction sawmill and grist mill into the early 1900's.


The Plough Shop
blacksmiths or mechanics specializing in plow and tool making and repair
 

The Gilson Plough Shop in Grannis Canyon/Hollow would have been at the Grannis farmstead area.  The traction sawmill was initially north of the farmstead area but was moved around through the decades to the mid section of the 'hollow' and to the farmstead area.  There may have been more than one steam engine in the Hollow.  Oliver Gilson's involvement after 1860 is not known.  He may have sold out the equipment to Grannis or other smiths or moved some/all to his farm.  The Gilson tax base in 1860 was about double that of both Alonozo and Samuel Grannis in 1870.  Since Alonzo Grannis is listed as a manufacturer in the 1870 census he may have been operating the plow shop.  His brother Samuel is listed as a sawyer with part ownership in 1870. The rails would not come up-steam or westward along the Volga River valley until later in the 1870's so being listed as a manufacturer for wood products is questionable.  Early in 1870, Alonzo Grannis went west for the rest of his life and Samuel took over the Grannis Mill, who would move on from the milling operation in the early 1880's.  The Grannis Mill changed hands and but operated as a steam traction sawmill and grist mill into the early 1900's.

Manual powered and Line powered shops

Blacksmith and Plough/Tool Shops in 1850-1870+, Fayette Co, Iowa, would be powered by a variety of methods from the manual type above, to the line drive below.  Line drives offered use of more sophisticated machinery to include grinders, drills, hammer mill, polishers.  Line drives could be powered by water, horse, oxen or steam.  In the early years before and even after rails came,  local tool production and repair was critical to successful farm development.  As with mills, whenever a smith set up shop, often one or more other merchants and craftsman were found, or perhaps a country  school or church, thus neighborhoods developed and/or platted villages.  Many smiths also farmed or later bought farms.  Good farms were a stable, highly respected and a better livelihood.

1857 July Plough & blacksmith shop in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, when the population was listed as 1,830 in the 1860 census.  Paper advertisement:  Green & Graves Manufacturing Works;  steam powered making/manufacturing of all kinds of wood and iron machinery, agricultural tools, mill irons, gearings, shaftings, castings, and all kinds of wrought iron work, full and complete foundry room, large and well selected lot of patterns or prepared to make patterns for new and old work, machine shop fitted with engine lathes, iron planers, screw & bolt cutters, all the necessary machinery for fitting up work in the best styles, large wood shop in which we are prepared to do all kinds of wood work for machinery or tools.  Blacksmithing and Plow Shop for all kinds of wrought iron work.  Large saw mill for the manufacturing of all kinds of lumber, shingles, lath, pickets, prepared to saw custom logs.  Now manufacturing the Peoria Plows.  Our work is warranted to give entire satisfaction or return. Also manufacturers and dealers in one and two horse powered threshing machines, separators, circular saw mills, cross-cut saw machines for logs. Dog and sheep power. Wholesale and retail, at Cedar Rapids.


 


Nearly all 1850-1870 acres in Fayette Co, Iowa, were broken (opened, plowed) by horse/oxen powered, walk-behind single share plows.

 



Do not trust as totally valid any tree/report data.  Often World Connect or Ancestry trees/data were utilized as a foundation upon which to add material gleamed from obits, articles, histories, biographies, stories, burials, censuses and other data collected.  My primary interest is generally the pioneer history and includes linking village and neighborhood surnames together for several of the early generations.  Family connections, locations and other data may have to be speculated in order to continue a complex series of inter-related projects.  My web pages are primarily personal study projects for note keeping, but can also jump start others.  I have a huge number of projects started and rarely return to edit/update material unless interest is rekindled.  Any web pages online are usually linked off the 'Index Page.'  Numerous projects are not put on web pages but are in draft form or in the form of photo albums on the 'Photo Hosting Site.'   I may have material for research use in storage, plus will/can upload other people's material if appropriate.



 

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Hannibal, MO 


 

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